Features

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Features, History, lincoln square, NYC Guides, Upper West Side 

Lincoln Square, a part of the Upper West Side, is a literal square of approximately 50 blocks that runs east-west from Central Park West to the West Side Drive and north-south from 59th to 72nd Streets. The neighborhood, which is bisected by Broadway and contains the Lincoln Center “superblock,” has an enormous amount of culture, loads of prestigious schools, tons of old-school luxury residences lining the park, and a massive, five-acre, four-building new development called Waterline Square, finalizing a decades-long master plan for the neighborhood. Ahead, we take a look at the neighborhood’s history, from its Dutch roots to Robert Moses’ slum clearance, modern residential development, and all the amenities that make this area more fun than one may think.

Your guide to Lincoln Square

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Events, Features, film, NYC Guides

After a winter like ours, who wants to go inside again? Thankfully, there are tons of opportunities in New York City to stay outside all day, even to see movies. And what’s better than enjoying the warm weather by scoping out your place on the lawn, picnicking, sipping your favorite summer drink, and enjoying a film under the city lights. (Best of all, they’re free!) Ahead, we’ve rounded up 16 of the best outdoor movie screenings, from spots up and down the Hudson to cool rooftops to unique locales like the plaza outside the Oculus and the Intrepid’s flight deck.

Check out the whole list

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Architecture, Art, Features, History, Landscape Architecture, NYC Guides, Top Stories

hidden attractions nyc, underground nyc, nyc attractions

While visiting the major, most popular attractions of New York City can be fun, it can also be stressful, overwhelming and full of selfie-taking tourists. However, the great thing about the Big Apple is that plenty of other attractions exist that are far less known or even hidden in plain sight. To go beyond the tourist-filled sites and tour the city like you’re seeing it for the very first time, check out 6sqft’s list ahead of the 20 best underground, secret spots in New York City.

More this way

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Art, Bronx, Features, Landscape Architecture

Photos courtesy of William Christ

Opened in 1863, and long known as the final resting place of some of history’s most notable figures— Irving Berlin, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Robert Moses, F.W. Woolworth, and Herman Melville, to name a few–the Bronx’s Woodlawn Cemetery and Conservatory is also home to many treasures of the living variety. When one of Woodlawn’s trees (of which there are a whopping 140 different species!) meets its ultimate fate, the cemetery doesn’t merely bury it but rather celebrates its life by carving it into an animal that can be found on the grounds.

Find out the meaning behind this tradition

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apartment living 101, Features, NYC Guides

Photo via Pexels

Everyone loves kids, right? While this may be true in most cases, when it comes to renting and buying apartments, kids can be a deal breaker. To be clear, in NYC, owners cannot discriminate against renters with children, but there are a few exceptions. For example, co-ops, which are free to come up with their own selection criteria so long as it doesn’t overtly discriminate, can privilege quiet tenants over potentially loud tenants. If you have a couple of toddlers or even teens who look like they might be prone to hosting all-night parties or jam sessions in your living room, you might find yourself looking for housing elsewhere. But don’t be discouraged. After all, New York is home to more kids than any other U.S. city.

As of 2016, over 21% of New York City residents were under 18 and more than 6.6% were under five. With roughly 1.8 million infants, toddlers, kids, tweens, and teens living here, most city buildings are home to children and adolescents. The challenge facing parents is finding a building that is not only tolerant of kids but has the facilities, location, and support needed to make one’s childrearing experience easier rather than harder. This 6sqft Guide offers tips for prospective and new parents, as well as those who are not new to parenting but are new to the city, who are looking to rent or buy in a child-friendly building and neighborhood.

Our full guide to finding a child-friendly home in NYC

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Features, GVSHP, History

She shot Andy Warhol: The story behind actress Valerie Solanas’ attempt to assassinate a NYC icon

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Fri, June 1, 2018

Photo of the Decker Building via Wally Gobetz on Flickr; photo of Andy Warhol via Wikimedia

1968 was a turbulent year marked by riots, massive protests, and assassinations of notable political figures such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Bobby Kennedy.

But 50 years ago on June 3, 1968, an attempted assassination in New York City shook the downtown art world more deeply and personally than any of these other headline-grabbing events. Perhaps that was because it involved two quintessentially downtown figures — one a world-famous artist; the other, a struggling, mentally unbalanced aspiring writer/performer/self-proclaimed social propagandist, whose greatest claim to fame ended up being her attempt to kill the former, her one-time employer.

Find out more

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Features, photography, Queens, The urban lens

Basia Serraty, Ridgewood

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Basia Serraty shares her photos of Ridgewood. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

While Basia Serraty admits in an essay she wrote for Ridgewood Social that, upon moving to New York from her small town in Poland, the city did not fit her expectations, she has grown to love this place nonetheless. Her photos of Ridgewood, her neighborhood since moving here in 2004, capture the quiet but colorful corners of the nabe, portraying a clear sense of life despite a general lack of people. Ahead, we talk to Basia about her journey from Poland to NYC, her work, and why she loves Ridgewood.

Stroll through Ridgewood with Basia’s photos

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Events, Features, History

8 things you didn’t know about LGBT history in NYC

By NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project, Wed, May 30, 2018

This Saturday, 6sqft is excited to sponsor “The Hunt: NYC LGBT Sites.” Put on by our friends at Urban Archive and the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project, the three-hour historic scavenger hunt will mark Pride Week by focusing on the history of the LGBT community in NYC. To give 6sqft readers an idea of what to expect, the Historic Sites Project has put together eight things you probably don’t know about LGBT history in New York, from the four remaining lesbian bars in the city to the first LGBT activist organization.

All this and more history!

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Features, Getting Away, Hotels, Places to Stay, Upstate

10 glorious glamping sites near New York City

By Michelle Colman, Wed, May 30, 2018

Glamour camping–combining luxury with minimalism–is all the rage. While you might have to get yourself a bit outside the big city to enjoy such a getaway, there are plenty of spots not too far afield. And whether they are fully off-the-grid or just feel like it, they’ll restore your mind and spirit as you return to nature but don’t have to give up your high thread count sheets, wifi or working showers. From a mobile tiny house to a geodesic dome to a horse farm tipi, we’ve rounded up 10 of the best glamping resorts near NYC.

Check out the list

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Features, Furniture, real estate trends, renting 101

Photo via Pixabay

Currently sleeping on a mattress with no box spring? Worse yet, a blow-up mattress? Is your night table a repurposed milk crate and are your bookshelves fashioned out of salvaged bricks and found lumber? Although all these features can be surprisingly charming when paired with the right accessories, there comes a time in one’s life when one wants or needs a bit more. But even if you opt to go full-on Ikea, the cost of furnishing a small one-bedroom from the ground up will likely cost well over $3,000 and that is only if you opt for a discount Bråthult over Vallentuna sofa.

For anyone faced with the challenge of furnishing an entire apartment—either for the first time or because you’re only in NYC for a limited amount of time—there is now a solution: “fast interiors.” Rather than buy, you can now rent your furniture for three months or for several years. While the rise of furniture rentals may sound unusual, in fact, it is an obvious extension of the sharing economy that has been growing, especially in highly populated urban areas, for the past decade. An underlying tenant of the sharing economy is that renting often makes more sense the owning. But does it? Ahead, we explore how and where to rent furniture and the relative short- and long-term benefits of renting over buying.

A guide to furniture rentals

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