Features

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, New Developments, People

oosten condos, huys penthouses, piet boon, karin heyn, piet ouldof, dutch design

Architect Piet Boon may hail from the Netherlands, but his status as a NYC starchitect is on the rise. Piet, who started his career as a builder, has over the years turned his practice to architecture and interiors, and today is a top choice amongst developers who want more than just a glass tower, but a building that promotes well-being through great design (oh-so-very Dutch). Piet recently sat down with us for an interview where he discussed everything from the differences he sees in Dutch and American design sensibilities, to his high profile Huys Penthouses project (which is almost sold out), to his new Oosten development for Williamsburg, to his definitively international style, which to our surprise he refers to as “barefoot chic.”

Read our interview with Piet here

Featured Story

Features, New Developments, real estate trends

apartment blueprint, 151 west 5th street, nyc blueprints, floor plans

In the mid-2000s, when the real estate market was red hot with new developments, home seekers gave nary a thought to making what can be described as the biggest decision of their lives: Buying something sight unseen.

For them, traipsing through model apartments, checking out pretty renderings, gawking at miniature models, stroking teensy squares of countertop finishes, thumbing through shiny marketing materials filled with information on everything but the kitchen sink to make an actual purchase was par for the course. (Oh, wait! They did include the kitchen sink.) But then all that changed by late 2007 when the stock market took a nosedive. Not a single potential buyer would even consider a new place to hang their hats without actually standing inside a frameless glass shower stall, checking out the size of a Sub-Zero refrigerator or getting high from real-time views seen through floor-to-ceiling window—and developers took note.

But that was then and this is now, and with an improving economy and increasing demand, the tides seem to have turned once again.

Is buying off blueprint back in full force?

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, Manhattan

architecture day trip nyc

New York has a long history of great architecture. From the very beginnings in the colonial period to today, there are more great buildings to see in New York than anywhere else on the planet. Thankfully, with this guide, you can see them all in one simple south-north trip across Manhattan. Many great buildings are too tall or difficult to see up close, so we’ve chosen an example of each style of New York architecture that can also be appreciated from the ground level, rather than forcing you to gawk straight up at a skyscraper. Check out our New York architecture day trip.

Get your itinerary here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Getting Away, Interviews, New Developments, People, Upstate

Drew Lang, Lang Architecture, NYC architects

Move over Hamptons — there’s a new second-home hotbed for New Yorkers: the Catskills. The four-season destination has been growing in popularity over the past several years, but is now reaching new heights thanks to Drew Lang and Lang Architecture‘s forest getaway community Hudson Woods. Located in Kerhonkson, New York, just two hours from New York City, the 131-acre development will feature 26 sustainably designed, site-specific dwellings, each located on its own spacious lot. Buyers can personalize their homes with curated upgrades including a pool and pool house, outdoor kitchen, vegetable garden, fruit tree grove, treehouse, and solar power energy system, among other things.

Hudson Woods’ tagline is “where design meets nature,” and one look at the site makes this statement ring true. We sat down with Drew Lang to get an inside take on the project, and to learn more about the increasingly sought after Catskills community.

Read our full interview here

Featured Story

Celebrities, Features, History, Upper West Side 

John Lennon and Yoke Ono, The Dakota, 1 West 72nd Street , NYC celebrity couples

Hotel Chelsea had the Warhol “superstars”, 740 Park Avenue has been considered the most sought after address in the world for 70 years, the San Remo boasts a rotating roster of celebrity residents–a lot of New York City buildings have their claim to fame. But none have as storied a past or talked-about current status as the famed Dakota at 1 West 72nd Street.

Best known as the site where John Lennon was killed when returning home with wife Yoko Ono, as well as its role in Roman Polanski’s acclaimed horror film “Rosemary’s Baby,” the Dakota’s mythical stature goes much deeper than its spectacular, fortress-like façade and proximity to Central Park. Long a desirable address for artsy celebrities, the building still attracts a slew of A-listers, but the strict co-op board is known to reject even the biggest names.

We’ve got the scoop on the legendary Dakota here

Featured Story

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Features, Manhattan

world cup 2014 players vs nyc real estate

It’s no secret that pro athletes make big bucks, but the world’s best soccer players are raking in Benjamins that would even make an NBA star blush. With top players like Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo pulling in up to $75 million, we can’t help but wonder what they’re doing with all that money. While yachts and Italian villas are fine buys, our suggestion to these star athletes is to pour it in some swanky New York property. (The Marquand or the Puck Penthouses, perhaps?)

If these soccer superstars ever decide to buy in New York, we’ve got each of their best bets ahead.

Check out our nifty infographic after the break

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History

Flashback: See The New York Skyline Change Over 150 Years

By Jason Carpenter, Sat, July 12, 2014

nyc skyline 1900s, nyc 1920, historic nyc, old nyc skyscrapers

The New York skyline is made up of twelve different decades of buildings, but when you look at them today, they all form a single beautiful picture. Over the last century and a half, that picture has changed dramatically. From the original skyscraper boom to the modern glass towers of today, the New York skyline has grown more and more impressive every year, and these pictures show the process step-by-step, as well as the impending future.

See our historic New York skyline photos here

Featured Story

Features, Interviews, New Yorker Spotlight, People, Restaurants

Lisle Richards and Eric Marx of the Monarch Room NYC, Lisle Richards, Eric Marx, Monarch Room NYC

Opening one restaurant is hard, but two in a month is a serious feat. But this is New York City, and restaurateurs Lisle Richards and Eric Marx were ready for a challenge. Between January and February of this year the duo opened up two of Manhattan’s hippest and most most talked about new haunts: The Monarch Room and The Wayfarer.

Our interview with the restauranteurs here

Featured Story

Cool Listings, Features

New York vs. London, NYC real estate, London real estate, NYC real estate comparisons

While we’re all still in the patriotic mood after the July 4th festivities, we thought it appropriate to put together a friendly little challenge between New York City and her cross-pond ally and sometimes rival, (what are the kids calling it these days, a frenemy?). In the left corner is NYC, global hub of finance and media, weighing in with a population of 8,405,837. And in the right corner we have London, the world’s most-visited city, population 8,416,535.

According to British real estate website Zoopla, the average price of a Central London home over the past year is £1.1 million or $2 million in U.S. dollars, topping the $1.6 million average selling price of residences in the core of Manhattan.

See how the cities battle it out in our three-round real-estate showdown

Featured Story

Features, History, Landscape Architecture, Roosevelt Island, Starchitecture

FDR Four Freedoms Park, roosevelt island, park roosevelt island, louis kahn

The Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedom’s Park may have opened relatively recently in 2012, but architect Louis Kahn was brewing up the design for the memorial park nearly 40 years earlier. Kahn’s death in 1974 (a somewhat tragic one which left him dead and alone in a Penn Station bathroom after a heart attack) was unfortunately accented by a dwindling reputation — Kahn’s sordid multi-family affairs had come to light upon his passing and his fading architecture practice was loaded with debt. But beyond all the scandal, Kahn also left behind a number of sketchbooks packed with complete sets of unrealized projects. One of these projects was the Four Freedom’s Park.

While plenty of accolades have been given to successful realization of the project so far after Kahn’s death, few have tracked where the architect may have pulled his inspiration for the design. That is until now. As a number of Kahn’s sketches emerge for public viewing, some are asking: Was the the design of Louis Kahn’s Four Freedom’s Park inspired by the Eye of Providence found on the U.S. dollar bill?

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