Features

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Features, Interviews, New Yorker Spotlight, People, photography

elias weiss friedman, the dogist, the dogist tumblr

Elias Weiss Friedman has devoted himself to photographing everyday New Yorkers. His subjects are diverse, come in all shapes and sizes, and they also happen to be dogs.

In a city that is estimated to have 600,000 dogs, it’s only fitting that Elias developed The Dogist, a photo-documentary series capturing New York’s four-legged friends. His work highlights the canines that bring so much character to the city, yet rarely get the recognition they deserve. As a photographer, blogger, and “dog humanitarian,” Elias is committed to introducing the Big Apple’s dogs to the world.

We recently caught up with Elias to find out how The Dogist came to be, and to find out what it takes for a pup to grab his attention.

Our interview with The Dogist here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Interiors

mad men don draper apartment, mad men apartment, don draper apartment

We admit it: We’re a bit obsessed with mid-20th century modern design–its architecturally and socially advanced concepts so often result in a perfect mix of aesthetic appeal and livability. Sometimes met with suspicion and derision in its earlier days, modernist architecture has endured the test of time and is having an enormous resurgence in popularity and appreciation. How else could you explain fans’ obsession with the award-winning and pitch-perfect mid-mod sets on Matthew Weiner’s “Mad Men.”

It’s often said that the best ideas in home design are the ones that make the home a great place to live; the origins of modernist design had that idea at their heart. We’ve rounded up a few of the city’s mid-century architectural treasures and a handful of homes that embody modernist style.

More on the ‘Mad Men’sets and NYC’s Mid-Century Modern gems this way

Featured Story

Art, Features

sotheby's new york sale

L to R: Massimo Vignelli and Bob Noorda’s original NYC Transit Authority Graphics Standards Manual; Mets Bullpen Cart; Gage Gold Freedom Box

The highly anticipated New York Sale, an online auction hosted by eBay and Sotheby’s, took place yesterday. The first platform of its kind, the sale offered 91 NYC-related lots, including many photographs and artworks, as well as rare city mementos like Andy Warhol’s 1963 lease for his first studio on 87th Street (which sold for $13,750, over the $12,000 high-end estimate). Not only does the auction site feature pricing information for the items, but it offers thorough descriptions and historic information about them, accompanied by relevant media.

In total, the sale raked in $2,101,814 for Sotheby’s, with the most expensive item being a replica of Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi’s clay model of “La liberté éclairant le monde”(the Statue of Liberty) that sold for $970,000. Other top sellers include a gold “freedom box,” the Mets Bullpen Cart, and a Tiffany & Co. silver Art Deco cigar box.

See all the top sales and those that didn’t make the cut here

Featured Story

Compare and Contrast, Cool Listings, Features

high low mad men-inspired apartments

Butterfield House at 37 West 12th Street (l); 225 East 74th Street (r).

In honor of the final season of “Mad Men,” we’ve found a pair of current listings with the modern appeal of the Draper apartment at (fictional) 783 Park Avenue. Accents that might come straight from the pages of a mid-century magazine—like a sunken living room, wood paneling and a Nelson hanging light–or 21st century perks like open kitchens, floor-to-ceiling windows, balconies and city views add up to just as much modern cool as they did in the “Mad Men” era. $2.8 million gets you a serious mid-century pedigree, an enclosed balcony and a prime Greenwich Village location, but for $925,000, a top-floor Upper East Side pre-war pad with a recent renovation, city views and a compellingly modernist vibe looks like a serious deal.

Check out these two ‘Mad Men’-worthy pads here

Featured Story

Events, Features, Interviews, New Yorker Spotlight, People

Native New Yorker Gil Shapiro founded Urban Archaeology in the early 1970s, when the salvaging movement was just catching on. With a collector’s–and creator’s–eye and an entrepreneurial spirit, he began re-imagining architectural remnants as treasured additions to the home environment. This month the company has been preparing for an auction taking place on March 27th and 28th, handled by Guernsey’s auction house, when nearly 1,000 of their long-treasured pieces of history will be sold to prepare for a move to a new location.

First opened in Soho in 1978, the store’s early customers–including Andy Warhol and other denizens of what was undisputedly the epicenter of the art world–adored the unique and time-treasured aspects of Shapiro’s restored architectural salvage pieces, yet they would always find ways they wished they could customize their favorite items. Finding that he excelled at bringing a fresh perspective to pieces of historical and architectural importance, he started reproducing individual pieces as well as creating new lines of bath fixtures and lighting, many of which originated in places like the Plaza Hotel, New York’s Yale Club and the St. Regis Hotel.

Read our interview with Gil here

Featured Story

Features, History, Hotels, Midtown

The Knickerbocker in 1912 via MCNY (L); The Knickerbocker today © NeoScape

When John Jacob Astor IV built the Knickerbocker Hotel in 1906, he launched a generation of luxury Times Square hotels. The Beaux Arts masterpiece attracted the likes of F. Scott Fitzgerald, John D. Rockefeller, and Italian tenor Enrico Caruso. It was the birthplace of the martini and the site where the sale of Babe Ruth from the Red Sox to the Yankees took place. But after just 15 years, the hotel’s success declined just as fast as it emerged and it was repurposed as an office space, later becoming the Newsweek Building.

Today, though, the landmark is reclaiming its title of ultimate luxury hotel under its original moniker. After a two-year, $240 million modern renovation, the Knickerbocker offers 330 guest rooms, a rooftop bar and lounge with the ultimate view of the Times Square ball drop, and a foodie destination restaurant from chef Charlie Palmer.

Uncover the history and future of the Knickerbocker

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affordable housing, apartment living 101, Features, NYC Guides, renting 101

rent stabilization NYC

Image New York – Soho (license)

In New York City there are currently about one million rent stabilized apartments–about 47 percent of the city’s rental units. So why is it so hard to snag one? What are the benefits of having one (other than affordable rent, of course)? According to the New York City Rent Guidelines Board nearly 250,000 rental units have lost the protections of rent regulation since 1994. Why are we “losing” so many of them?

Find out the facts and how they could affect you

Featured Story

Features, Interviews, People

Hart Island, Hart Island Project, Melinda Hunt

Since 1980, inmates at Rikers Island have buried 62,000 unclaimed and unidentified New Yorkers in mass graves on Hart Island, a small, mile-long piece of land to the east of the Bronx that is the largest tax-funded cemetery in the world, holding over one million bodies. Before its current use, the island served many uses, including a prison, psychiatric institution, tuberculosis sanatorium, and a boys’ reformatory. The Department of Corrections gained control of the land in 1968, and it has been closed to the public ever since.

That’s all changing, though, thanks to artist Melinda Hunt, who created the Hart Island Project, an interactive online memorial that provides access to information about the burials on Hart Island and tools for storytelling so that no one is omitted from history. The site’s Traveling Cloud Museum lets users look up information on their loved ones and share their personal memories. Last year, Melinda led the introduction of legislation that would give control of the cemetery to the Department of Parks and Recreation so that New Yorkers can freely visit the island and its graves. And coming up this Labor Day weekend, Emmylou Harris will sing at the gated entrance to the dock, calling attention to the Hart Island Project’s efforts.

We chatted with Melinda about her passion for Hart Island, how the Project has evolved, and what we can expect in the near future.

Read our interview with Melinda Hunt here

Featured Story

Features, Interviews, New Yorker Spotlight, People

New York Couch Doctor ,Sal Giangrande

Every New Yorker has been there: After searching for and securing the perfect apartment, moving day comes and you just can’t get your favorite piece of furniture into the elevator or up the stairs. With movers on the clock, and stress setting in, you begin to consider ditching your couch altogether. But instead, you take a deep breath, grab your phone, and let Sal Giangrande come to the rescue.

Like knights in shining armor on moving day, Sal and his team over at New York Couch Doctor are experts at disassembling and reassembling everything from couches to pool tables to box springs. They liken their precision to that of surgeons, cutting into and stitching back together dressers and entertainment centers seam unseen (for the most part). And, like surgeons, they’re on call 24 hours a day.

We recently chatted with Sal to learn more about his days being New York’s go-to furniture doctor.

We chat with sal

Featured Story

Compare and Contrast, Cool Listings, Features

Brooklyn Heights Duplexes, 115 Willow Street, 108 Pierrepont Street

115 Willow Street, $2.35 million (L); 108 Pierrepont Street, $575,000 (R)

This freshly-listed, charming bi-level bolt-hole in prime Brooklyn Heights at 108 Pierrepont Street may be petite, but it’s tucked into the same elegant neighborhood as the house-like duplex at 115 Willow Street, also new to the market, that’s going for $2.35 million. Also in a beautiful, well-kept historic prewar building, with the same access to the Promenade, park and neighborhood highlights, the former rings in at a far-lower $575,000.

Compare and contrast these Brooklyn Heights duplexes with very different prices

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