Features

Featured Story

Bronx, Features, Interviews, New Yorker Spotlight, People

Coco Peru Drag Queen

Dating back to 1685, the quaint nautical community of City Island has fought hard to retain much of the charm that makes it an anomaly in the heart of the bustling Bronx. So perhaps it is fitting that one of the island’s most colorful natives—and once a bit of an anomaly herself—shares her memories of growing up in New York City’s sleepy little fishing village.

Larger-than-life personality and drag queen extraordinaire Coco Peru’s life today couldn’t be much further from her years spent as a child on the quiet streets of City Island. Based in LA and traveling the world to bring her often irreverent but hysterically funny brand of storytelling to the masses, Coco’s tales from her youth often steal the show.

But it’s probably safe to say the majority of Coco Puffs (her beloved fans) have never even heard of this small island in the Bronx—and that most New Yorkers haven’t made the trip over the 113-year old soon-to-be-replaced bridge that represents the only point of access by car or foot. Which is why we are quite excited to bring you this exclusive peek into two of the city’s most unique treasures: City Island and Miss Coco Peru.

Read the interview with Miss Coco here

Featured Story

6sqft gift guide, Events, Features, holidays

14 Hip Holiday Markets and Indie Pop-Up Shops in NYC

By Michelle Cohen, Fri, December 5, 2014

capsule nyc holiday market

Capsule Market Square.

As December dawns, the holiday gift markets roll in, and it’s harder than ever to turn around in NYC without encountering a pop-up shop or makeshift mall offering everything anyone could ever want–whether they know it yet or not–for the body, mind, soul and home. We’ve assembled a list of smaller, cooler pop-ups and holiday markets that mix music, food and fun freebies like haircuts, goodie bags and beer with this year’s selection of clever, crafty gifts.

Find out where to get the goods, this way

Featured Story

City Living, Features, real estate trends

Satmar community Williamsburg brooklyn new york, orthodox jews brooklyn, orthodox jews new york

Certain neighborhoods are becoming increasingly sought after by observant Jews—but in keeping with what is written in the Torah, apartment hunting can be a formidable undertaking. Observant Jews not only have to deal with New York City’s low vacancy rate but they need to find a home that, most importantly, is within walking distance to shul (synagogue) from sundown on Friday to sundown on Saturday and some Jewish holidays—owing to the fact that Sabbath obligations, of which there are a lot, do not allow one to drive a car. It goes against what’s written in the Torah to start or extinguish fires during the Sabbath, and, well, cars burn fuel. And by the way, this also means cooking only one, single, solitary item.

Find out more here

Featured Story

Design, Features, holidays

modern holiday trees poster, modern holiday tree

If your ideas for decking the halls lean more toward Knoll, Eames and Adelman than red, gold and pine, you’ll be happy to see that these non-traditional trees embody the winter holiday spirit with modern style. See what we’ve rounded up for you ahead!

More modern tree ideas this way

Featured Story

Features, holidays, opinion, People, Social Media

NYC scene

That’s the question that we’ve been asking 6sqft’s friends and Twitter followers leading up to Thanksgiving. It’s easy to get pulled into the NYC complaining vortex (The 6 train is delayed again?! You’re raising my rent how much?!), but the reality is that we live in the greatest city in the entire world, and there’s plenty here to be thankful for, whether it’s something as small as seeing a cute dog on the street or as large as visiting famous museums.

Read the responses we got here

Featured Story

Design, Features, holidays, Interviews, New Yorker Spotlight, People

Macy's Wesley Whatley, kermit the frog, Wesley Whatley

For one day each year, Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade transforms the streets of New York City into the ultimate stage for marching bands, dancers, floats, and of course, giant balloons. As we can all imagine, putting on a parade of this magnitude is no small task. And that’s where Wesley Whatley, the Parade’s creative director, comes in.

Wesley is responsible for overseeing, developing and bringing the creative side of the event to life. His role requires vision, organization and a deep understanding of the parade’s history and its importance to both the city and America. Along with his team, he ensures it’s a magical event for spectators and television viewers.

In anticipation of tomorrow’s parade, we spoke with Wesley about selecting marching bands and performers, the logistics of organizing such a large event, and, on a personal note, what parades mean to him.

read the interview with Wesley here

Featured Story

City Living, Events, Features, holidays

NYC Volunteer Opportunities: Giving Thanks and Giving Back

By Michelle Cohen, Tue, November 25, 2014

nyc volunteer events, new york food bank

The season of good cheer–and good food–has begun, but there are many who are left out in the cold. Share the abundance; volunteer your time, your food, or your funds (or all of the above) to help spread real warmth to all New Yorkers. We’ve rounded up Thanksgiving volunteer opportunities around the city to make it even simpler for you to give back.

Check out our list of ways to get involved

Featured Story

Features, Interviews, New Yorker Spotlight, People

Norwich Meadows Farm, Union Square Greenmarket, Tompkins Square Greenmarket, Zaid Kurdieh, nyc greenmarket, where to get local produce, where to get organic produce, high tunnels, turkeys

What does a farm in Norwich, New York have to do with New York City? Well, Norwich Meadows Farm actually serves as a farmer to many New Yorkers. In fact, if you have ever shopped at Union Square or Tompkins Square Greenmarkets, you might have purchased their local, organic fruits, vegetables, eggs and poultry. Perhaps you have even spoken with Zaid Kurdieh, the farm’s managing partner.

Zaid is responsible for providing New Yorkers with access to local, organic foods at farmers’ markets and beyond. He has shares in a number of CSAs and supplies a number of well-known restaurants—which means when you last ordered greens or beets with your meal, they might very well have been his.

We recently spoke with Zaid at Union Square’s Saturday Greenmarket about providing the city with local, organic foods, how the farm is preparing for Thanksgiving, and their collaboration with Cornell University.

Check out the interview here

Featured Story

Features, History, Hotels, Midtown West

Algonquin Hotel

In a town overrun with fancy hotels, the Algonquin–which turns 112 tomorrow–has true staying power, proving that history and heritage are every bit as important as plush bedding and sweet-smelling bath products.

Designed by Goldwin Starrett in a Renaissance limestone and red brick façade, the 12-story Algonquin Hotel, at 42 West 42nd Street, opened on November 22, 1902, initially operating as an apartment hotel with year-long leases but switching to a hotel after the owner failed to find enough renters. Today, the Algonquin–both a literary landmark and a New York City Historic Landmark–remains one of New York’s most cherished institutions, drawing a mix of artists, tourists and cultural elites.

Read the full history of the storied Algonquin

Featured Story

Features, Historic Homes, History, Queens, Urban Design

Forest Hills Gardens via Joe Shlabotnik via photopin cc

This unique sheltered enclave might be the perfect spot for residents who can handle the rules; just don’t call it FoHiGa.

Occupying a 175-acre wedge just south of the Forest Hills LIRR station and within the greater Queens neighborhood of Forest Hills, Forest Hills Gardens is one of America’s oldest planned communities. Modeled after England’s “garden cities,” originally intended to create an ideal environment that incorporated shared green space with urban convenience for the working classes, the Gardens (as it’s known) is home to about 4,500 residents. The private community is managed by the Forest Hills Gardens Corporation, an organization made up of property owners.

This unique community consisting of over 800 free-standing and attached houses and 11 apartment buildings as well as churches, parks and storefronts, dates from 1909, when architect Grosvenor Atterbury and landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted Jr.–-son of Frederick Law Olmsted, landscape architect who helped design Central Park–-were commissioned to plan a new town. Though the community lies within the boundaries of one of the world’s most modern and populous cities, it has retained much of its co-operative, idyllic nature.

Find out more about this unique community

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