Features

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Features, History, yorkville

The hopping history of German breweries in Yorkville

By Lucie Levine, Thu, October 10, 2019

Jacob Ruppert’s Knickerbocker Beer, 1912, via Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division

If you spent the first weekend of October hoisting lager and Oomph-ing it up for Oktoberfest, then you joined a long and proud tradition of German beer production and consumption in New York City. In fact, New York’s German-owned breweries were once the largest beer-making operations in the country, and the brewers themselves grew into regional and national power-players, transforming Major League Baseball, holding elected office, and, perhaps most importantly, sponsoring goat beauty pageants in Central Park. While brewing flourished in both Manhattan and Brooklyn throughout the 19th century, the city’s largest breweries were clustered in Yorkville. In fact, much of the neighborhood’s storied German cultural history can be traced to the rise of brewing in the area, and the German-language shops, cultural institutions and social halls that sprang up to cater to the brewery workers.

Get more Hopping History Here!

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Events, Features, holidays, More Top Stories

halloween, events, governors island, flotilla, night of 1000 jack o lanterns

Image courtesy of the Central Park Conservancy.

Some say Halloween is New York City’s favorite holiday. And while those who indulge in its fright-fraught fun may celebrate in different ways, there’s a scare out there for everyone. We’re all under the spell of the fabulous Village Halloween Parade, from its history to its most avid participants; if that doesn’t satisfy your craving for fright-week fun, peruse our list of Halloween happenings from family-friendly to extra freaky.

Find something to BOO

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Features, Interiors, My SQFT House Tours, Park Slope, Top Stories

natalie skoblow, mysqft, park slope

Our series “My sqft” checks out the homes of New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to the Park Slope apartment of digital marketing strategist and sustainability advocate Natalie Skoblow. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

Many New Yorkers fill their apartments with second-hand goods for that vintage aesthetic or because it’s affordable. But Long Island-native Natalie Skoblow thrifts because it also benefits the environment. “From the clothes in my closet to the photos on the wall, almost everything in our apartment is either locally made, thrifted, or sustainably made,” Natalie told us on a recent tour of her Park Slope apartment. What began as a hobby in high school became a “full-fledged love affair” with supporting sustainable, ethical brands. From the books found on the sidewalks of her neighborhood to the antique maps of Brooklyn above the piano, Natalie and her boyfriend Jesse’s apartment brings new life into old pieces. Ahead, meet Natalie, along with the couple’s newly adopted puppy Ollie, and tour her apartment, which she describes as “playful, vibrant, and welcoming.”

Meet Natalie and see inside

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Events, Features, NYC Guides, Top Stories

The 10 best apple and pumpkin picking spots near NYC

By Rebecca Fishbein, Mon, October 7, 2019

Photo via Pixabay

Autumn is wonderful in New York City because you can finally take the subway without getting smushed up against someone’s back sweat. It’s wonderful outside New York City because you can take in the changing leaves and crisp air, and there are few places better to do that than a local farm. Some of the best spots near town offer apple and pumpkin picking, in addition to a slew of other fall-ready activities, making it easy to bring some of autumn home with you (as well as to enjoy the great outdoors a short distance from the city smog). Ahead, we’ve rounded up our 10 favorite spots.

Check ’em out!

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East Village, Features, History

12 historic Italian-American sites of the East Village

By Andrew Berman of Village Preservation, Thu, October 3, 2019

October, the month we mark Columbus Day, is also Italian-American Heritage and Culture Month. That combined with the recent celebrations around the 125th anniversary of beloved pastry shop Veniero’s inspires a closer look at the East Village’s own historic Little Italy, centered around First Avenue near the beloved pastry shop and cafe. While not nearly as famous or intact as similar districts around Mulberry Street or Bleecker and Carmine Street in the South Village, if you look closely vestiges of the East Village’s once-thriving Italian community are all around.

In the second half of the 19th century, the East Village was a vibrant checkerboard of ethnic enclaves. Germans were by far the dominant group, until the turn of the century when Eastern European Jews took over the Second Avenue spine and much of what’s now Alphabet City, Hungarians congregated along Houston Street, and Slavs and Poles gravitated towards the blocks just west and north of Tompkins Square. But a linear Italian-American enclave formed along and near First Avenue, broadening at 14th Street. Vestiges of this community survived into the third quarter of the 20th century, with just a few establishments and structures connected to that era continuing to function today.

Get the full list

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Events, Features

The 2019 Open House New York Weekend schedule is here!

By Michelle Cohen, Wed, October 2, 2019

Photo courtesy of Open House New York

The annual Open House New York Weekend is around the corner, and the calendar and guide to tours, events, and access to typically off-limits sites have been released. OHNY Weekend is Friday, October 18, Saturday, October 19 and Sunday, October 20. Highlights include new sites like Pier 35 eco-park , the TWA HotelThe Spur High Line (the last section of the original High Line rail structure to be converted into public space) and 277 Mott, a new core and shell project by Toshiko Mori Architect with a twisting facade that appears to shift as pedestrians approach. There are also featured sites like the Brooklyn Navy Yard and special curated series like Factory Fridays and Open Studios. Tools to help you plan your weekend include an event guide, an interactive map showing where “open access” sites and events are located throughout the five boroughs, and an itinerary planner.

Some highlights to look for during OHNY 2019 this way

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Features, NYC Guides, Top Stories, Upstate

The 7 best places to see fall foliage outside NYC

By Rebecca Fishbein, Tue, October 1, 2019

A downside to living in a thriving city is that air pollution makes for poor fall foliage, though some spots in town—Wave Hill, Pelham Bay Park—still boast colorful leaves at the end of October. But if you take a short trip outside the city limits, you can see some beautiful autumn colors, all within a day’s drive. Sadly, the best fall foliage sightseeing trip is no more—Amtrak retired its glass-domed Adirondack train in 2018. But there are other spots to take in the season; here are our seven favorites.

Check out all the spots

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Architecture, Archtober, Events, Features, More Top Stories

Archtober 2019: Top 10 events and program highlights

By Michelle Cohen, Fri, September 27, 2019

Archtober is an annual architecture and design festival consisting of tours, events, films, lectures and exhibitions celebrating New York City’s love affair with the built environment. During the month of October, a full calendar of events puts a focus on the importance–and the future–of architecture and design. Organized by the Center for Architecture, over 80 partner and sponsor organizations across the city add their voices to the festival. Now in its ninth year, Archtober offers something for everyone—from the arch-intellectual with a love for concept to the armchair designer with a thing for waterways, parks or sustainable design—in the 100+ event roster. Below, we pick 10 intriguing highlights from this year’s offerings.

Celebrate architecture and NYC at these cool events

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Events, Features, NYC Guides, Top Stories

Grab some lederhosen and a giant beer, it’s time to celebrate Bavarian culture in New York City. Oktoberfest has officially arrived in the five boroughs and beyond, offering the chance to travel to Munich without a passport. Festivities range from traditional stein-holding competitions and pig roasts to more out-of-the-box events, like the Voelker Orth Museum’s Flushing-style Oktoberfest with sauerkraut and kimchi eats and brews in the zoo at Turtle Back Zoo.

Get the full list

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Features, hudson yards, Restaurants, Where I Work

All photos taken by James and Karla Murray exclusively for 6sqft.

When New York Times food critic Pete Wells visited José Andrés’ Mercado Little Spain, he declared that it had “more great food and drinks per square foot than anywhere else in New York.” From Ibérico hams and Peking duck to the seemingly simple yet ever-pleasing pan con tomate, the food at Hudson Yards’ Spanish market has certainly made its mark on the gastronomy scene. But what sets Andrés apart from other chefs and restauranteurs is his entire vision. Mercado Little Spain is designed as a series of “streets,” with the various kiosks leading guests on a curated experience. Most of the design elements and materials were sourced from Spain, and the artists commissioned represent different regions of the country.

To bring his vision to life, Andrés assembled a stellar team, including Michael Doneff, the Chief Marketing Officer at his ThinkFoodGroup; Juli Capella, co-founder of Spanish architecture and design firm Capella Garcia Architecture; and NYC-based design studio (and NYC food hall experts) ICRAVE. Ahead, take a behind-the-scenes tour of Mercado Little Spain and hear from all these amazing and talented collaborators on what it was like working on the project.

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Archtober