Features

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Features, History, The urban lens, Top Stories

todd webb, todd webb photography

“I instantly fell in love with Webb’s work,” says former LIFE editor-in-chief Bill Shapiro, “with the beauty he captures, with his sense of the life of the street; with the way he frames both the sweeping, iconic skyline and those small, fleeting moments that define the city that New Yorkers love.”

These sentiments seem to be shared by just about everyone who encounters the work of Todd Webb for the first time. Webb, most fittingly described by Shapiro as “the best NYC photographer you’ve never heard of,” worked and laughed alongside photography’s upper echelon, including Georgia O’Keeffe, Walker Evan, Gordon Parks and Ansel Adams, but unlike his well-known friends, Webb was never interested fame. Instead, he quietly took to documenting life in America, particularly post-war New York between 1946 and 1960.

more on the work of todd webb here

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Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

In a city where hundreds of interesting events occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top picks for 6sqft readers!

Photography lovers are in for a treat this week: New York legend Martha Cooper opens a new exhibition of her photographs of graffiti in the 1970s and 80s; historic works from India by iconic street photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson are on show at the Rubin Museum; and touching portraits of West Africa by young photographer Anne Barlinckhoff are being showcased at The Quin. If you need a break from real life, take in the immersive and contemplative installation of Doug Wheeler, or float away on Pinaree Sanpitak’s meditative piece at Brookfield Place. Finally, join in on an Earth Day conversation in Times Square, or take in the work of “forgotten “ New York street artist Richard Hambelton in an event happening one night only.

More on all the best events this way

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Events, Features, More Top Stories

With spring weather in full effect, the city’s flea and food markets roll out the red carpet and the irresistible edibles, and it’s pretty likely there’s one happening near you. The shop-and-snack mecca Brooklyn Flea has changed locations yet again, a night market returns in Queens and antiquing, arts and local maker standbys in all corners of Manhattan offer more of what you didn’t know you couldn’t live without. The goods may be odd, but they’re out there, and the list below rounds up 20 of the city’s top food and flea picks. Just don’t blame us for the tchotchke overload—or the calories.

Find a market this weekend

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Features, Interiors, MY SQFT HOUSE TOURS, Top Stories

suzy chase osborne, CookeryByTheBook, west village apartment

6sqft’s ongoing series “My sqft” checks out the homes of New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to the West Village apartment of podcasting pioneer and DJ Suzy Chase. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

Years ago, when Suzy Chase was presented with the opportunity to bring every piece of furniture from her childhood Kansas home to NYC, there was no question of what she’d take, but rather how she’d take it all with her. Steeped in a bounty of antiques and heirlooms, Suzy knew she could never part with the items that she loved so much growing up. So, rather than putting it all into storage, she made the decision to clear out her family’s 900-square-foot West Village apartment and fill it with as much of her Kansas furniture as possible.

While many of you are probably asking why she didn’t consider selling or donating these items, there is, of course, a twist to this story, and her situation is one that is quite unique: She’s a descendant of the Chase family, one of the United States’ most important political families.

Ahead, have a look inside Suzy’s home, a modestly sized two-bedroom filled with relics from the Revolutionary and Civil wars, centuries-old paintings, rare books and photographs, and countless other objects that were on American soil well before the Mayflower even touched Plymouth Rock.

see more inside here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Interiors, Interviews

The Brooklyn Home Company (THBCo) is a family-run cooperative of artists and builders that develop unique residential spaces in booming Brooklyn. Best described as white and wood but never cookie cutter, their work is always light and airy, and blend modern style with historic elements. It’s this signature style that’s made THBCo a favorite amongst both renovators and Pinterest enthusiasts alike.

But what inspires their designs and how do they decide where to develop projects? Ahead, 6sqft speaks to THBCo’s co-founder and Head of Operations, Bill Caleo, about the business. Find out how this family-run establishment firmly roots itself in working with local makers, how they’ve grown their business model to include sustainability, and why they always add a custom piece of art to all their homes.

our interview with bill here

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Design, Features, Green Design, Toolbox Tutorials

Toolbox Tutorials: Learn to make a simple macramé plant hanger

By Igor Josifovic and Judith de Graaff, Mon, April 17, 2017

6sqft’s new series Toolbox Tutorials shares step-by-step guides for simple, affordable DIY projects. This week, Igor Josifovic and Judith de Graaff, founders of Urban Jungle Bloggers and authors of the new book “Urban Jungle: Living and Styling With Plants,” teach us how to make an easy macramé plant hanger. Have a project you’d like to share? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

In small apartments, the valuable real estate on shelves and windowsills gets used up fast, but don’t let this deter you from bringing in some greenery. Even if your flat surfaces aren’t available, there’s always room for a hanging plant, which can be suspended from the ceiling, a wall or window, or a doorknob that’s not used on a daily basis. To do this, we’re showing you how to make macramé hangers for anything from regular terracotta pots to colorful salad bowls that have rounded bottoms.

The illustrated, step-by-step guide ahead

Featured Story

Features, MY SQFT HOUSE TOURS

Have your apartment photographed by 6sqft!

By 6sqft, Fri, April 14, 2017

Did you spend months decorating your apartment? Is your home historic or quirky? If you live in a unique or just plain beautiful space, 6sqft wants to see it! We’ll send a reporter out to your residence for a photo shoot and short interview and then feature your abode in all its glory for our Mysqft series!

How to submit your home!

Featured Story

Features, photography, The urban lens

Sam Golanski, NYC corner buildings, Narrow and Corner Buildings

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Sam Golanski highlights New York’s unique narrow and corner buildings. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

6sqft recently featured Sam Golanki’s photography series “Park Avenue Doormen,” where he gave the men who safeguard the Upper East Side’s ritzy buildings a chance to step out from behind the velvet ropes and in front of the camera. He’s now taken a similar approach–albeit this time with buildings, not people–in his collection “Narrow and Corner Buildings.” Choosing to forego iconic structures like the Flatiron Building, Sam instead focuses on small structures off the beaten path that may otherwise be overlooked. “I realized the corner is the center of each block, a place for small businesses, barbershops, and coffee shops,” he said, explaining that he didn’t pre-plan the series, but rather was drawn to these unique structures while strolling the city.

Get a look at all the photos

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Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

The Drawing Center, William Beebe, GenderFuck, Eva Mueller, Prince Street Project Space, Mando, Amanda Marie, Hyland Mather, DK Johnston, the MARCY Project, Ellis Island Hospital Tour, JR, The Happening, Local Project Art Space, Art F City, Galerie Tanja Grunert, Laura Duvall, Margaret Velvet, Tribeca Film Festival

In a city where hundreds of interesting events occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top picks for 6sqft readers!

This week, check out the legacy of the Department of Tropical Research Field Expeditions at the Drawing Center through a series of nature drawings that date back over a century, then speed into the future and explore androgyny at Prince Street Project Space. Amanda Marie’s Darger-esque pieces open at MARCY Projects, and The Corp shows off an exhibition made over one hellish evening. Art group The Happening is back for an evening to raise money for Planned Parenthood, and you can go goth to support the blog Art F City. Finally, grab a hard hat and explore the abandoned Ellis Island Hospital with Untapped Cities, then dive into a bag of popcorn as the Tribeca Film Festival comes back to town.

More on all the best events this way

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Features, Interiors, MY SQFT HOUSE TOURS, Top Stories, Williamsburg

molly young, teddy blanks, molly young apartment, williamsburg loft, brooklyn loft

Our ongoing series “My sqft” checks out the homes of 6sqft’s friends, family and fellow New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to the Williamsburg loft of Molly Young and Teddy Blanks. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

Melding belongings is often a struggle for couples who take the leap and move in together. Many fear that their individuality will be lost to their partner’s vision, personal items packed away because there’s “just not enough room.” But for Molly Young, a New York Times Magazine contributor and crossword puzzle creator, and Teddy Blanks, a graphic designer and director, checking one’s ego and a co-regent rule are key to unrestrained creativity and authenticity in the home.

In this week’s My sqft, Molly and Teddy bring us into their incredible 1400-square-foot loft, a hidden gem situated within an innocuous factory building along an even more innocuous Williamsburg street. Filled with color, whimsical artwork, and quirky objects procured everywhere from eBay to Etsy to a failed Sotheby’s auction, this pair’s apartment reveals that cohabitation can and should be a co-creative endeavor that both inspires and amuses.

go inside molly and teddy’s home

Featured Story

Design, Features, Interviews, More Top Stories, People

Paula Scher is one of the most recognizable names in the design world, considered legendary in the industry for creating the identities of major New York institutions. Scher moved to New York in the 1970s to begin her design career and got her start in the music industry. As art director for CBS, she designed around 150 albums a year and produced numerous ads and posters. Her record covers include everything from the Rolling Stones’ Still Life to Leonard Bernstein’s Stravinky, four of which were recognized with Grammy nominations. As a record designer, Scher was credited with reviving historical typefaces and design styles—and typefaces still play heavily in her work today.

Scher left Atlantic Records to begin her own design firm in 1982, and in 1991 she joined her current firm, Pentagram, as the company’s first female principal. Although Pentagram is an international design company, its New York office is behind the identities of some of the city’s most beloved establishments. It was at Pentagram Scher established her reputation as a New York designer who created unique, lasting identities.

more with Paula Scher here

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Features, History

Past Prisons: Inside the new lives of 7 former NYC jails

By Penelope Bareau, Mon, April 10, 2017

The past week has been full of news about Rikers Island and Mayor de Blasio’s announcement that the notorious prison will be closed and replaced with smaller facilities throughout the boroughs. Ideas for re-use of its 413 acres have included commercial, residential and mixed-use properties; academic centers; sports and recreation facilities; a convention center; or an expansion of nearby LaGuardia airport. And while anything final is estimated to be a decade away, this isn’t the first prison in NYC to be adaptively reused. From a health spa to a production studio to a housing development, 6sqft explores the new lives of seven past prisons.

Read more

Featured Story

Features, History, photography, The urban lens, Top Stories, Transportation

Sid Kaplan, New York Transit Museum, NYC train history, Deconstruction of the Third Avenue El, elevated trains NYC

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. This week’s installment comes courtesy of a new exhibit at the Transit Museum, “Deconstruction of the Third Avenue El: Photographs by Sid Kaplan.” Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

After the city consolidated its underground subway lines in 1942 (they were previously owned by private companies), fewer New Yorkers were riding the elevated lines. This decreased ridership, along with the fact that the Els ate up valuable street-level real estate and created dangerous dark spaces, led to the city taking down the Second Avenue Elevated line in 1942. In 1955, the Third Avenue Elevated came down as well, catching the eye of a then 17-year-old Sid Kaplan, whose photos of the dismantling are currently on display at the Transit Museum’s Grand Central Gallery Annex. The museum tells us, “From his perch on the roof of an apartment building, or leaning out the window of an office, his images capture a unique perspective of the removal of a hulking steel structure, the hard-working people who dismantled it, and the ever-changing landscape of New York City.”

More on the El history, Sid’s work, and all the amazing photos

Featured Story

Art, Events, Features

In a city where hundreds of interesting events occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top picks for 6sqft readers!

This week, designer agnes b. teams up with Craig Costello of Krink for a photo show and clothing collaboration, while Ilegal Mezcal presents a new music series to benefit Planned Parenthood. Street artist Swoon presents a series of prints curated by Brooklyn Street Art to benefit her Heliotrope Foundation, and the Cooper-Hewitt Museum opens a show dedicated to the glitzy aesthetics of the Jazz Age. Flemish artist Peter Depelchin makes his American debut in Brooklyn, and Spoke Art opens a massive group show dedicated to David Lynch. Finally, curator Akeem Duncan ponders the concept of “forever,” and the Rubin Museum asks visitors to slow down for Slow Art Day.

More on all the best events this way

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Bed Stuy, Features, Green Design, Interviews, People, Studio Visits

In our series 6sqft Studio Visits, we take you behind the scenes of the city’s up-and-coming and top designers, artists, and entrepreneurs to give you a peek into the minds, and spaces, of NYC’s creative force. In this installment we take a tour of the Bed-Stuy urban farm Square Roots. Want to see your studio featured here, or want to nominate a friend? Get in touch!

In a Bed-Stuy parking lot, across from the Marcy Houses (you’ll know this as Jay-Z’s childhood home) and behind the hulking Pfizer Building, is an urban farming accelerator that’s collectively producing the equivalent of a 20-acre farm. An assuming eye may see merely a collection of 10 shipping containers, but inside each of these is a hydroponic, climate-controlled farm growing GMO-free, spray-free, greens–“real food,” as Square Roots calls it. The incubator opened just this past November, a response by co-founders Kimbal Musk (Yes, Elon‘s brother) and Tobias Peggs against the industrial food system as a way to bring local food to urban settings. Each vertical farm is run by its own entrepreneur who runs his or her own sustainable business, selling directly to consumers. 6sqft recently visited Square Roots, went inside entrepreneur Paul Philpott‘s farm, and chatted with Tobias about the evolution of the company, its larger goals, and how food culture is changing.

Take a tour of Square Roots and get the full story from Tobias

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Art, City Living, Features

The 10 best neighborhoods for New York City artists

By Devin Gannon, Tue, April 4, 2017

Like most things in New York, creative communities come and ago as new development and rising rents force artists to move on to the next best, or cheaper neighborhood. While 6sqft found ‘hoods like the Upper East Side, Harlem and Long Island City to be the best places for artists a few years back, we’ve updated our top-10 list to reflect the changing times. Ahead you’ll find some areas you may expect–Sunset Park and Bushwick, for example, along with more up-and-coming artsy enclaves like Newark, Washington Heights, and the South Bronx.

The full list right this way

Featured Story

Features, photography, sponsored content, The urban lens

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. This week’s installment has been sponsored by 100 Barclay and zooms in on the murals that adorn the ceilings of the landmarked building.

Much attention has been given to the landmarked 100 Barclay as of late thanks to a recent redevelopment of the upper floors into luxury apartments by Magnum Real Estate Group and the CIM Group. The full-block building, which sits on a site at the southern edge of Tribeca and just off the Hudson River waterfront, was originally constructed between 1923 and 1927 as the headquarters of the New York Telephone Company. Then known as the Barclay-Vesey Building (also the New York Telephone Building), the tower was the first Art Deco skyscraper ever constructed, designed by a young Ralph Walker while he was just an associate at McKenzie Voorhees & Gmelin. Walker’s design provided not only a launching pad for his own career—he soon after became a partner in his firm and later went on to become one of the country’s most esteemed architects—but the Barclay-Vesey would provide inspiration for many of New York’s future skyscrapers.

explore the murals here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Starchitecture

Zaha Hadid’s unknown, unbuilt and celebrated projects in New York City

By Ondel Hylton and Dana Schulz, Fri, March 31, 2017

A year ago today, Zaha Hadid’s sudden passing at age 65 rocked the architecture world. Best known for her signature swooping and curving forms and for being the first female to win the Pritzker Prize, she surprisingly has only one project in NYC, the under-construction 520 West 28th Street. Likely due to an unwillingness to tame her energetic visions to suit a developer’s bottom line, the majority of her work envisioned for the city remains unbuilt. To mark the one-year anniversary of her passing and to pay tribute to her “larger than life” creations and personality, 6sqft has rounded up Zaha Hadid’s projects and proposals for NYC.

All the projects, this way

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Features, History, Meatpacking District, More Top Stories

Today it seems like there’s a new food hall popping up every day, but one of the first incarnations of this trend was at Chelsea Market, when Irwin Cohen and Vandenberg Architects transformed the former Nabisco factory in the 1990s into an office building, television production facility, and food-related retail hub. New York City history buffs likely know that this is where a certain famous cookie was invented, but there are plenty of other fun facts about the location that are much less well known. Therefore, 6sqft has rounded up the top 10 most intriguing secrets of Chelsea Market.

Find out everything here

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Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

Georgia O’Keefe, Andy Warhol, Frida Kahlo, Brooklyn Museum, AIPAD, Sunok Chin, NU Hotel, Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker, Museum of Modern Art, Naoko Tosa, Times Square Arts, #midnightmoment, The Art of Spray paint, Lori Zimmer, Logan Hicks, Joe Iurato, Hueman, Matt Eaton, Remi Rough, Ian Kuali'i, Nick Walker, Zac Braun, BR163, John Matos, CRASH, PichiAvo, Wallworks NY, Ground Floor Gallery, Kirsten Flaherty, Erin Smith, Amy Li Projects

In a city where hundreds of interesting events occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top picks for 6sqft readers!

Spring is upon us and so is a whole new week of great art events. This weekend, see some of the best of the photography world at AIPAD or head to Brooklyn to check out Welancora Gallery’s new partnership with Nu Hotel. The Brooklyn Museum is also deconstructing the artist’s persona and hosting a new Georgia O’Keeffe exhibition. #MidnightMoment also kicks off a new film in Times Square—this April, Naoko Tosa’s “Sound of Ikebana” will take over the screens every night. Finally, come pick up my new book, “The Art of Spray Paint,” and check out its corresponding exhibition at Wallworks Gallery in the Bronx.
More on all the best events this way

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apartment living 101, City Living, Features

types of air-purifying and air-cleaning plants

Our ongoing series Apartment Living 101 is aimed at helping New Yorkers navigate the challenges of creating a happy home in the big city. Previously, 6sqft rounded up a list of 10 nearly indestructible plants that are ideal for apartment dwellers with black thumbs. Now, we’re taking a look at plants that are powerhouses when it comes to cleaning indoor air.

Outdoor air quality is a concern for all, but few of us consider the airborne pollutants that have infiltrated our homes. Toxins from carpet, paint, upholstery and cleaning products are just a handful of modern-day products that can degrade indoor air quality, and studies have shown too much exposure to these manmade elements can cause lung and respiratory issues over the long run. Luckily, there are a number of houseplants that moonlight as efficient purifiers. Ahead you’ll find 15 of the best air-purifying plants suited for apartment living, according to Dr. B.C. Wolverton, a scientist who worked with NASA to develop a breathable environment for long-term lunar habitation.

15 plants to help keep indoor air its purest

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Features, Greenwich Village, photography, Restaurants, The urban lens

Murray's Cheese NYC, Rob Kaufelt, James and Karla Murray

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, award-winning photographers James and Karla Murray return to give us a behind-the-scenes tour of Murray’s Cheese. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

Murray’s Cheese was founded in 1940 on Cornelia Street. When Rob Kaufelt bought the business in 1991, he grew the store into an internationally known food destination that now includes educational programs, a full-service restaurant, catering, and state-of-the-art cheese aging caves in Long Island City. Personally, our love affair with Murray’s Cheese began in 1994, when we were newlyweds on a budget, often buying cheese from the small Bleecker Street store to eat with some freshly baked bread purchased from the nearby Zito & Sons Bakery. Plus, with Murray’s being our namesake, we felt an immediate connection to the store.

Just last month, the Kroger Company purchased the equity of Murray’s Cheese and its flagship Greenwich Village location to form a merger of the two companies. As this new era approaches, we decided to capture all the cheesy goodness of the store, restaurant, and caves, as well as chat with Rob, cavemaster PJ, and Murray’s Cheese Bar’s general manager Jake Goznikar to learn about Murray’s history, unique contributions to local and world-wide food culture, and future.

Take the grand tour

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Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

whitney biennial, Visionaries: Creating a Modern Guggenheim, Solomon Guggenheim, Picasso, Duchamp, Calder, Andrew Jeffrey Wright, Arti Gollapurdi, Catherine Cohen, Lucy Cottrell, Steven Markow, Muchmore’s, Daniel Gustina, Museum at FIT, Ventiko, Chinatown Soup, Nick Schiarizzi, Knowckdown Center, House of Yes, Fashion, Marie Antoinette, Videology, Sofia Coppola, Laduree

In a city where hundreds of interesting events occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top picks for 6sqft readers!

See the newest of American art according to curators Christopher Y. Lew and Mia Locks at the Whitney Biennial, then check the original intent of Solomon R. Guggenheim’s collection at the museum bearing his name. Put your arty dancing shoes on for a party at the Knockdown Center, then celebrate fashion at the House of Yes. Get an insider’s look at Daniel Gustina’s designs for Old Hollywood at FIT, and check out Ventiko’s sanctuary at Chinatown Soup. Finally, spend an evening with funny artists at Muchmore, or indulge in your favorite French things at a screening of Coppola’s Marie Antoinette.

More on all the best events this way

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Features, History, Policy

Remembering New York City’s days of deadly smog

By Michelle Cohen, Wed, March 22, 2017

Smog covering the Empire State Building. New York, NY, US, November 21, 1953, LIFE Magazine.

Over Thanksgiving weekend in 1966, the layer of smog that hung above New York City killed about 200 people. An estimated 300–405 people died during a two-week smog episode in 1963. In 1953, as many as 260 died from breathing the city’s air over a six-day stretch.

6sqft reported recently on Donald Trump’s proposed budget and subsequent concerns about the impact significant funding cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency totaling $2.6 billion or 31 percent–including staff reductions and program eliminations–might have on the city’s drinking water and air quality. A spokesman for Mayor de Blasio assured us that these federal cuts won’t impact NYC’s high quality water supply. But what about the air?

But what about the air?

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Features, Interiors, MY SQFT HOUSE TOURS, Upper West Side 

Anthony Triolo apartment, NYC tiny apartment, Upper West Side tiny apartment, 150-square-foot apartment

Our ongoing series “My sqft” checks out the homes of 6sqft’s friends and fellow New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to an Upper West Side brownstone where Anthony Triolo lives in just 150 square feet. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

When Anthony Triolo moved into a 150-square-foot studio on the Upper West Side in 2010, he thought it would be a temporary money-saving move. Seven years later, he’s changed careers from the architecture field to acting (you’ve seen him in “How I Met Your Mother” and “How to be Single” and he’s currently filming the upcoming show “Bull”) and transformed his tiny home into a custom-designed, multi-functional retreat. Anthony describes his style as “casual elegance” and believes smart shopping and mixing affordable finds with some more high-end buys is the key to creating a comfortable home no matter what the size.

Take the tiny tour and get some tips from Anthony

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Architecture, Art, Features, Interviews

Developers are increasingly using art as a way to turn their buildings into more than just stacks of expensive apartments. Many see adding sculptures or installations as ways to activate a place, making it an integral part of the urban experience. But while most are eager to jump on the biggest names in the business, there are others that prefer to look locally for talent, using art as an opportunity to invest in the community in which they are building. One such company is Two Trees Management, which believes that “developers and property-owners must play a fundamental role in cultivating livable streetscapes.” To that end, Two Trees sponsors local creatives to work with them on their buildings, and for one of their most transformative Brooklyn projects, 300 Ashland, they commissioned local artist, designer and product inventor, Adam Frank (who lives less than two miles from the building) to install a stunning, large-scale, mirrored artwork, called LUCID.

Ahead, CityRealty speaks to Frank about his dreamy, out-of-the-box creation, and Lisa Kim, Two Tree’s Cultural Affairs Director, about the company’s community-driven approach to art and real estate.

READ MORE HERE…

Featured Story

Features, Queens, The urban lens

leandro viana, sherpas nyc

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Leandro Viana presents his ‘Sherpas’ project, a series centered on the Sherpa community of Elmhurst, Queens. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

Queens is the second-most populous borough in New York City with well over two million inhabitants. Queens is also New York City’s most diverse borough, boasting a population that is nearly 50 percent foreign-born with individuals hailing from over 100 different countries. In all, there are around 500 different languages spoken, some of which can be traced back to the most remote corners of the world. And within this cornucopia of culture are the Sherpa people.

While the word Sherpa for many will recall scenes of mountaineers scaling the snowy peaks of the Himalayas, in recent years, more and more Sherpas have planted their flags in the much more level neighborhood of Elmhurst, Queens. Indeed, today there are nearly 3,000 Sherpas living in New York City, making for the largest population outside of South Asia. Ahead, Brooklyn photographer Leandro Viana shares his series documenting this unique group in their new land, spotlighting their efforts to preserve their language, religion, culture, and arts so far from home.

See more from Leandro’s series here

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Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

In a city where hundreds of interesting events occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top picks for 6sqft readers!

Break out after the blizzard cabin fever, and get into an evening at MoMA for their yearly Members Party (yes, that means you need to become a member if you aren’t already!) If architecture is more your thing, celebrate the Van Alen Institute at The Tunnel, or if you’re just not into parties, get cultural at the opera in Bushwick. BBQ joint/gallery Fort Gansevoort welcomes guest curator Hank Willis Thomas for a new show, and Creative Time stages a Shirin Neshat talk at the beautiful Cathedral of St. John the Divine. Enjoy historic postcards of synagogues of the past at Museum at Eldridge Street, then appreciate the surreal illustrations of You Jung Byun. Finally, get an insider’s tour of Grand Central Terminal, including a jaunt across its catwalk to get your very own aerial pictures of the beautiful concourse.
More on all the best events this way

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Architecture, Features, Getting Away, Historic Homes, History

Yes, there are Eichler homes in New York! They are sometimes called “lost Eichlers,” as most of noted mid-20th-century developer Joseph Eichler’s homes exist in Northern and, to a lesser degree, Southern California. Three custom-built Eichler houses were constructed (and still stand) in the Rockland County, New York community of Chestnut Ridge, just north of Eichler’s hometown of New York City.

Joseph L. Eichler, whose modernist tract homes can be found throughout the Bay Area in Northern California as well as the Greater Los Angeles area, was one of the most celebrated residential homebuilders of the mid-20th century. His homes are enthusiastically “collected” by modern design buffs, and their renovations appear on the covers of design and home decor magazines like Dwell and Metropolitan Home.

Find out how a tiny East Coast enclave continues to enjoy the Eichler lifestyle

Featured Story

East Village, Features, photography, The urban lens

The Urban Lens: Inside McSorley’s Old Ale House, NYC’s oldest bar

By James and Karla Murray, Fri, March 10, 2017

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, award-winning photographers James and Karla Murray return for Saint Patrick’s Day with a look inside McSorley’s Old Ale House. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

With Saint Patrick’s Day just around the corner, McSorley’s Old Ale House–located in the East Village on East 7th Street by Cooper Square–is readying to welcome a crowd of beer-loving New Yorkers and out-of-towners alike. What sets this watering hole apart, aside from its limited “dark or light” menu, is that it’s the oldest bar in the city, a distinction proven after extensive research by the bar’s official historian Bill Wander. We recently paid the Irish tavern a visit to capture its historic details such as the original wooden bar and pot-bellied stove; iconic tchotchkes adorning the walls, which run the gamut from shackles worn by a prisoner of war from the Civil War to a horseshoe that legend says came from one of the horses that pulled Abraham Lincoln’s hearse; and the fun-loving crowd that can be seen there on a typical day. We also chatted with Teresa Maher, the very first woman to work behind the bar in 1994.

See all the photos and hear from Teresa

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