Features

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Features, real estate trends, Top Stories

Health and high-rise living: Is higher healthier?

By Cait Etherington, Today, January 24, 2017

manhattan at night, manhattan at night aerial view

In 2017, new high-rise developments will continue to define the city’s skyline. There are currently more than 30 high-rise developments under construction and proposed for the waterfront in Queens. In Manhattan, rezoning initiatives promise to bring more high-rise developments to neighborhoods from East Harlem, Two Bridges and Midtown East. And in Downtown Brooklyn, with the 2016 approval of the borough’s tallest tower and a slew of other skyscrapers wrapping construction, the height trend is also well underway. If high-rise developments are on the rise citywide, it is not a surprise. By building up, the City of New York is able to maximize available space and even diversify certain neighborhoods by creating mixed-income housing communities. At their best, high-rise developments can drive economic and social change, but are these buildings also good for our health?

Long before the arrival of today’s supertalls, New Yorkers were already concerned about the potential dangers of high-rise living and not without legitimate cause. When the city’s first skyscrapers appeared in the late nineteenth century, poor air circulation and lack of light posed considerable health risks to high-rise dwellers. Although modern technologies and advanced building designs have improved life above the sixth floor over the past century, the relative benefits and risks of high-rise living and its impact on one’s life expectancy continue to be debated by researchers around the world.

more on high-rise living and health this way

Featured Story

Features, History

george washington, donald trump, inauguration

As Washington, D.C. attempts to rein in the crowds on this Inauguration Day, New Yorkers can be thankful someone else is dealing with the traffic snarls for a change. We’re guessing, though, that if Donald Trump had any say on the matter, New York City would be hosting the inauguration as it did for the nation’s first president in 1789.

Some other ways times have really changed

Featured Story

Brighton Beach, Features, photography, The urban lens, Top Stories

Chaz Langley, Brighton Beach, Russian culture NYC, NYC photography

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Chaz Langley explores the people and establishments that breathe life into Brighton Beach. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

6sqft recently featured Chaz Langley‘s photo series “A Stroll in Chinatown,” where he captured the neighborhood’s unique cultural establishments and the everyday comings and goings of its residents. He’s now taken the same approach with Brighton Beach, Brooklyn’s beach-front community that’s often referred to as “Little Odessa” for its strong Russian community. Langley, a Nashville native who moved to New York almost a decade ago to pursue a career as a singer/songwriter/actor/model, has taken to sharing his location-specific collections on Instagram, integrating his graphic design background in their presentation. From a fruit stand to boardwalk, his Brighton Beach series certainly paints a picture of the neighborhood.

See all the photos here

Featured Story

Features, Interviews, People

greystone-jeff-simpson

Jeff Simpson, the CEO of Greystone Development, is due to celebrate his ten year anniversary with the company this February. In his decade with the real estate firm, founded in 1992, he has overseen Greystone’s reemergence into the New York market by tapping into emerging neighborhoods around the city. Before he joined Greystone, Simpson worked with the Equity Office Properties team, helping reposition a number of their New York City office buildings, and oversaw over $100 million of redevelopment projects for Jones Lang LaSalle.

Simpson has more or less done it all when it comes to real estate, holding roles in investment, construction, engineering and management across all sectors of the market. At Greystone, he oversees the firm’s development team, managing new acquisitions as well as design, construction, sale and leasing. CityRealty spoke with Simpson on how the company has distinguished itself as a New York developer since it ramped up its investments in 2012, taking on projects in City Island, Brooklyn and Harlem. He also filled us in on new projects the company will debut next year—and the one development that’s most meaningful to him.

READ THE INTERVIEW AT CITYREALTY…

Featured Story

Events, Features, Top Stories

inauguration-day-nyc-lead

A couple weeks ago, a long list of artists, including Cindy Sherman and Richard Serra, started a petition calling for cultural institutions to close on Inauguration Day as “an act of noncompliance” against “Trumpism.” That list has grown to 740 artists and critics, and many galleries, museums, and academic spaces will shut their doors tomorrow according to the J20 Art Strike. But there’s also a long list of museums and cultural institutions across the city that have decided to take an alternate approach and remain open, offering free admission and/or special programming. From a marathon reading of Langston Hughes’s”Let America Be America Again” at the Brooklyn Museum to special gallery tours at the Rubin, these are all the (free!) ways to use the arts as an outlet on Inauguration Day.

See the full list here

Featured Story

apartment living 101, City Living, Features, Interiors

7 tips for soundproofing a noisy apartment

By Annie Doge, Wed, January 18, 2017

apartment-living-101-soundproofing

Image via Mysqft

6sqft’s series Apartment Living 101 is aimed at helping New Yorkers navigate the challenges of creating a happy home in the big city. This week we go over how to bring peace and quiet to a noisy apartment.

Most of us will never get used to the sounds of jackhammers, children screaming, or our neighbors getting a little too, um, frisky on the other side of our apartment wall. But luckily there are several solutions that can help you muffle (or hopefully mute) these urban intrusions—and they’re far easier to implement than you may think. We’ve rounded up some simple soundproofing home upgrades, as well as a couple more robust improvements, that will help you achieve a quieter household.

Get started soundproofing here

Featured Story

Features, History, Midtown East

Grand Central Station, Bradford Gilbert, historic photos of Grand Central

Grand Central Station in the early 1900s

Historic photos of the original Penn Station are almost as common as images of the current site, since its demolition in 1963 is often credited with spearheading the modern preservation movement (and because its grandeur is a startling reminder of how loathed the current station is). Conversely, Grand Central is typically celebrated as a preservation victory. In 1978, the courts ruled in favor of the Landmarks Preservation Commission when Penn Central Railroad sued them to build a huge tower atop the terminal and demolish one of its facades. But believe it or not, the 1913 Beaux-Arts building was not the first Grand Central, and photos of these grand earlier structures are rarely shared.

See them here and get the full history

Featured Story

Features, photography, The urban lens

newsstands-nei-valente-15

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment Brazilian designer Nei Valente presents his series of nighttime newsstand photos. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

By day, Nei Valente is a designer at branding agency Brand Union, but in his free time he photographs street scenes around the city, many of which are taken once the sun has set. In “Newsstands,” he captures the changing face of newsstands around the city, exploring how their evolution relates to our shift from print to digital media. Inspired by Moyra Davey’s newsstand series of 1994, Valente finds it fascinating how newsstands have changed over the last couple of decades.

Read more

Featured Story

Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

new-museum-nyc

In a city where hundreds of interesting happenings occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top event picks for 6sqft readers!

Get nasty this week with not only one, but two powerful group exhibitions featuring female artists who are biting back at The Untitled Space and The Knockdown Center in Queens. Get a curator’s insight on art history at The Met, then step into the future of art with a talk on virtual reality at The New Museum. David Zwirner welcomes the work of famed illustrators R. Crumb and his wife, and Canada Gallery discusses the work of Elizabeth Murray with Linda Yablonsky. Finally, educate yourself on New York history, first with an incredible photography show about New Yorkers in protest at the Bronx Documentary Center, then at UnionDocs for a film on the Lower East Side of yesteryear when squatters ruled the streets—and abandoned buildings.
More on all the best events this way

Featured Story

Features, Interviews, People

212fifth_lobby_lo

Skyscraper heights may be what make news headlines, but at the end of the day it’s the call of a stunning interior that gets a contract signed.

Developers of New York City’s most luxurious buildings understand this well, and it’s why the same bold-faced names in interior design are often associated with the most splendid of buildings. One firm that has firmly cemented its place on this esteemed shortlist is Pembrooke & Ives. Established in 1987 by Andrew Sheinman, Pembrooke & Ives has worked on everything from sprawling lodge interiors in Aspen to outfitting private jets for the world’s 1 percent. And here in NYC, the firm has been involved in designing the interiors for a number of much-talked about residential buildings, including The Chatsworth at 344 West 72nd Street, The Astor at 235 West 75th Street, 155 East 79th Street, and what some call the ultimate Manhattan address212 Fifth Avenue (In fact, Alec and Hilaria Baldwin recently toured a $16.6 million spread at the building). Ahead we catch up with founder Andrew Sheinman about the evolution of Pembrooke & Ives, what it’s like to work with game-changing developers like Thor and Madison Equities, what influences his firm’s work, and more.

READ THE INTERVIEW WITH ANDREW AT CITYREALTY…

Featured Story

Features, Interiors, MY SQFT, Park Slope

alexandra-king-park-slope-brooklyn-nyc-apartment-mysqft-lead

Our ongoing series “My sqft” checks out the homes of 6sqft’s friends and fellow New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to the Park Slope apartment of journalist and gallery owner Alexandra King. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

If you needed any more proof that British women just have “it” when it comes to style, place your gaze no further than Alexandra King. The expat journalist, writer and one half of downtown gallery Lyles & King seems to have a knack for turning naught into something noteworthy—just look at her apartment.

Alexandra came to NYC seven years ago, first living on her own and then moving into a grimy Chinatown pad with her then-boyfriend-now-husband, Isaac. Following a somewhat traumatic event at their old building, the pair decided to leave Manhattan and high-tail it to leafy Park Slope. While their new neighborhood offered a different kind of charm than Chinatown, their one-bedroom rental still left a lot to be desired; the accent walls for example were painted in what Alexandra describes as “a bizarre shade of poop brown.” But leave it to an enterprising creative to transform a turd into a gem. Alexandra saw plenty of potential in the dank space and jumped on the lease. Despite having a few what have I done?! moments, Alexandra worked her magic and completely transformed the apartment. Ahead she gives 6sqft a tour of her bright boho-chic abode, and shares her fail-safe plan for creating an inspiring home.

go inside

Featured Story

apartment living 101, Design, Features

10 ways to warm up your apartment this winter

By Rebecca Paul, Mon, January 9, 2017

winter-apartment-tips

Image via Studio Padron–see more on 6sqft

6sqft’s series Apartment Living 101 is aimed at helping New Yorkers navigate the challenges of creating a happy home in the big city. This week we share some tips for warming up your space for fall and winter.

With winter bearing down on us, it can often feel impossible to get warm. But in addition to layering on fuzzy socks and turning up the thermostat (if you’re one of the lucky New Yorkers who has this control!), there are some easy tips and tricks for keeping the temperature and mood in your apartment cozy all winter long Not only is it important to reassess some of our more functional home accessories like bedding and window dressings, but it’s also smart to consider how design can help a space feel warmer and more inviting as we hibernate for the rest of the chilly months.

See 6sqft’s list of winter-ready hacks

Featured Story

Features, Transportation

jfk-airtrain

Earlier this week, Governor Cuomo unveiled his latest nine-figure infrastructure proposal, a $10 billion overhaul of JFK Airport. As 6sqft explained, the plan address three main issues: “unifying all the terminals with an interconnected layout so the airport is more easily navigable; improving road access to the airport; and expanding rail mass transit to meet projected passenger growth.” This final point included a direct rail link so that passengers traveling to and from Manhattan wouldn’t need to ride the subway to connect to the AirTrain. The Regional Plan Association decided to explore this idea further, and in a report out today they’ve detailed five different approaches for a “one-seat ride” to JFK, which includes an extension of the Second Avenue Subway and a new underground tunnel.

All the possibilities right this way

Featured Story

Features, Transportation, Urban Design

New York clocks in more steps on average than any other state in the country, and that number is most definitely skewed by New York City where more residents hit the pavement than the gas pedal. But in a town that’s seemingly dominated by pedestrians, car culture maintains the right of way. According to Vision Zero, NYC’s program to reduce traffic-related fatalities, being struck by a vehicle is the leading cause of injury-related death for children under 14, and the second leading cause for seniors.

Providing more public space for pedestrians has become an increasing concern for the city over the last decade, and as such, a multitude of plans have been put forward to create sanctuaries from traffic or to reconfigure streets to keep people safe. But beyond preventing traffic accidents, by planting more trees, expanding sidewalks and bike paths, and installing seating, these urban renewal projects have also been key in promoting walking, biking, health and ultimately a more desirable and habitable New York City.

see more here

Featured Story

Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

Spoke Art, Zach Tutor, Tim Okamura, Erik Jones, Steve Kim, Kit King, So Youn Lee, Adam Lister, JJ Brine, Vector Gallery, Henry Chalfant, CRASH, Revolt, Eric Firestone Gallery, Ayakamay, The Lodge Gallery, Center for Architecture (AIANY), Brooklyn Museum of Art, Target Free Saturdays, Hirokazu Kore-eda, Museum of the moving image, The City Reliquary, Philip Johnson, Pipilotti Rist, #Midnightmoment

Happy New Year! New year, new month, new #Midnightmoment film in Times Square. This month Pipilotti Rist flattens and squishes her face each night across the screens in conjunction with her solo show at the New Museum. SF’s Spoke Art also opens a new show curated at Supersonic at their LES outpost, and Japanese artist Ayakamay examines media perception at The Lodge Gallery. But if you’re looking for a throwback or something more low-key, hear from old school graffiti writers at Eric Firestone Gallery, or treat yourself to new and exciting film at the Museum of the Moving Image. Lastly, head to The City Reliquary to catch a screening about Philip Johnson’s iconic World’s Fair pavilion in Flushing Meadow, bring your ideas to The Center for Architecture, and then visit the Brooklyn Museum for free courtesy of Target.

More on all the best events this way

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Technology

house-of-the-future

At the start of every new year, futurologists inform us of what the next 12 months might have in store. For 2017, there is widespread speculation that the Internet of Things will continue to reshape our lives and homes in profound and lasting ways.

If you haven’t already familiarized yourself with the Internet of Things (also known simply as the IoT) the concept is generally used to talk about the networking of objects. Increasingly, sensors are being embedded in physical objects of all kinds from refrigerators to running shoes to pacemakers. These objects are then linked through wireless networks to the Internet. When objects are networked, however, their potential changes. When you network a pair of shoes, for example, data can flow from the shoes to a computer for analysis. In turn, a shoemaker can start producing shoes not simply in your size but shoes that are made-to-order to better respond to your specific way of walking or running. The bottom line is that when objects can both sense what is happening in an environment and communicate this information back to us and to other objects, they are no longer simply innate objects but rather responsive tools that can be used in new and potentially revolutionary—and scary— ways.

READ MORE HERE…

Featured Story

Features, Transportation, Upper East Side

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Today history is made, as January 1, 2017 marks the official public opening of the long-awaited Second Avenue Subway. The New York City transit endeavor has been in the works for nearly a century, and finally after countless delays and an eye-popping $4 billion bill, straphangers on the far Upper East Side will have access to three brand new stations at 72nd, 86th and 96th Streets.

Just before midnight yesterday evening, Governor Cuomo, MTA CEO Thomas F. Prendergast, city and state pols, members of President Obama’s Cabinet, local community members, and many of the workers who helped build the new line’s massive underground tunnels and stations, took the line’s inaugural ride.

photos this way

Featured Story

Features, real estate trends

nyc-skyline-downtown-2017

CityRealty spoke with New York City real estate experts—everyone from developers to architects to contractors to brokers—on their predictions for the upcoming year in the city’s ever-changing real estate market. From the presidential election of real estate magnate Donald Trump to the likely return of 421A tax incentives, 2017 promises big changes ahead. And yes, renters can look forward to more apartment concessions from landlords coming next year.

2017 PREDICTIONS THIS WAY…

Featured Story

Features, Most Read Stories

6SQFT’S TOP STORIES OF 2016!

By Dana Schulz, Thu, December 29, 2016

As we wrap up 2016, 6sqft is taking a look back at the top stories of the past 12 months in topics like apartment tours, celebrity real estate, new developments, transportation proposals, and history. From a look inside a Williamsburg loft filled with more than 500 plants to news of Brooklyn’s first 1,000+ foot tower receiving approvals, these are the stories that readers couldn’t get enough of.

See the full list here

Featured Story

Features, holidays, Midtown

times-square-ball-drop

Every year as the clock nears midnight on December 31st, anticipation runs high as the world holds its breath waiting for the sparkling New Year’s Eve Ball to descend from its flagpole atop One Times Square. We all know that the countdown starts at 10, but there are a handful of other fun facts to muse over when it comes to the city’s most lauded tradition. From the wattage of the ball to the weight of trash produced to how long it takes to get it all cleaned up, see what we’ve rounded up, in numbers, ahead!

More on New Year’s Eve in Times Square here

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