Features

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Art, Features, Restaurants, The urban lens

Lombardis NYC, All the Restaurants in New York, John Donohue, NYC restaurant drawings

Former New Yorker editor, artist, and food writer John Donohue is on a mission not to eat at every restaurant in New York City, but to draw them. He describes his project, Every Restaurant in New York as “an ongoing visual compendium of the city’s eateries,” and as “intentionally hyperbolic.” He’s figured out that by spending 20 minutes on each illustration, it’s mathematically possible to visit all 24,000 restaurants in the city in under a year. To date, he’s drawn nearly 200 restaurants, has an exhibit up of his drawings in Park Slope, and is selling prints of the restaurants (a portion of the proceeds from which he’ll donate to hunger-relief organizations). Ahead, John shares a collection of his drawings, from classic New York restaurants like Katz’s and the Grand Central Oyster Bar to new spots like Shake Shack and Carbone, and tells us how he got started on the project, about his process, and why he thinks drawing is good for the mind.

See John’s drawings ahead

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apartment living 101, Features

How to choose and install an air conditioner in NYC

By Devin Gannon, Thu, June 22, 2017

While a summer spent in the city can be an exciting time for New Yorkers (outdoor movies and concerts, rooftop bars, barbecues in the park and of course, ice cream trucks), it can also be quite miserable for those whose apartments don’t have central air conditioning. For renters, though, a window AC unit makes the most sense since it’s a much cheaper alternative to installing central air and can be taken to your next apartment. Although installing your own air conditioning unit can be intimidating, 6sqft has put together a comprehensive list of AC installation tips to help you chill out and enjoy the short and sweet summer months ahead.

Find out more

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Architecture, Art, Art nerd ny, Design, Events, Features

pride parade nyc

Art Nerd New York founder Lori Zimmer shares her top art, design and architecture event picks for 6sqft readers!

Tomorrow, experience a slice of New York life in 1850 at the Merchant’s House Museum or check out a modern street photographer at The Quin. Head up to the Bronx to check out two artists who have evolved from the subway art scene, then check out Astoria’s art offerings beyond the Museum of the Moving Image. Of course, there’s the biggest party of all this weekend- PRIDEFest, so put your dancing or marching shoes on. The female gaze is debunked at a beautiful show at The Untitled Space, the romance novel cover is examined and art critic Roberta Smith speaks to SVA for a free lunchtime talk.
Details on these events and more this way

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Brooklyn, Features, History, Landscape Architecture, More Top Stories

10 things you never knew about Prospect Park

By Emily Nonko, Tue, June 20, 2017

Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux debuted Prospect Park to the Brooklyn masses in 1867. And this year, we get to celebrate. What has become Brooklyn’s most iconic park is in its 150th anniversary, and the history along the way is fascinating. Though Olmsted and Vaux had already designed Central Park, they considered this their masterpiece, and much of the pair’s innovative landscape design is still on display across all 585 acres. But it was the result of a lengthy, complicated construction process (Olmsted and Vaux weren’t even the original designers!) as well as investment and dedication from the city and local preservationists throughout the years. After challenges like demolition, neglect, and crime, the Parks Department has spent the past few decades not only maintaining the park but restoring as much of Olmsted and Vaux’s vision as possible.

It’s safe to say that these days, Prospect Park is just as impressive as when it first opened to the public. And of course, throughout its history the park has had no shortage of stories, secrets and little-known facts. 6sqft divulges the 10 things you might not have known.

All the juicy secrets ahead

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Architecture, Events, Features, Giveaways, Policy, Urban Design

Cities for Tomorrow is back for its fourth year, and 6sqft has teamed up with the New York Times to give one lucky reader a free pass (worth $995!) to the event taking place July 10th–11th in Midtown Manhattan. Join creative visionaries and leaders in the real estate, urban planning, and political fields such as Momofuku founder David Chang, former Massachusetts Governor William F. Weld, NextGen Climate founder Tom Steyer, and filmmaker Barry Jenkins as they discuss topics ranging from the new power of private money to the future of bricks-and-mortar retail, from cities’ impact on the national climate agenda to the realities of leading during a time of partisan politics, from the promises and pitfalls of smart technology to fresh approaches to entrepreneurship.

HOW TO ENTER: All you have to do is sign up for our newsletter here. If you’ve already signed up, simply leave a comment below telling us what topic off this year’s agenda interests you the most. The deadline to enter is 11:59PM, Thursday, June 29th, and we will email the winner on Friday, June 30th. Good luck!

Those interested in purchasing a ticket can register here and get 20 percent off the admission price.

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Features, Interiors, MY SQFT HOUSE TOURS, Top Stories, Tudor City

tudor city studio, tudor city apartments, tudor city living, brian thompson nyc, tiny apartments, micro living, micro apartments nyc

6sqft’s ongoing series “My sqft” checks out the homes of New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to the Tudor City studio of  Brian Thompson. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

We’ve seen many solutions for tiny living employed here at 6sqft, from transforming furniture to elaborate built-ins to adding color and patterns to trick the eye, but as far as living minimally has gone, we’re not sure if we’ve seen a home opt for such a straightforward—but artful—setup. Located in the quaint and picturesque neighborhood of Tudor City is the 408-square-foot apartment of historian, activist, and real estate broker Brian Thompson. Rather than outfitting his apartment with built-in seating or complex hidden furniture (though he does have a Murphy bed), Brian has opted for an ultra-minimal setup that includes just three pieces of furniture: a couch, a bookshelf, and a desk—all of which can be arranged into an infinite number of livable layouts with just a simple push or a pull.

See more inside Brian’s incredible tiny home

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Far Rockaway, Features, History, People, photography, The urban lens

Rockaway Beach by Sam Shere, Sam Shere photography, indecent exposure tickets, Rockaway history

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, we share a set of vintage photos documenting Rockaway Beach in the 1940s. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

These days, beachgoers give nary a thought when stripping down to their skimpy bikinis and short-shorts, but 70 years ago wearing much more modest swimsuits was enough to get you a ticket from the NYPD. Noted LIFE magazine photographer Sam Shere (who’s best known for his iconic photo of the Hindenburg disaster) documented this “indecent exposure” phenomenon at Rockaway Beach in 1946. Starting with a sign that reads “wear robes to and from the beach,” Shere’s series shows women sunbathing in high-wasted two-pieces, men walking the boardwalk in just their shorts, and the way in which these beach bums seem unphased by the cops writing them summonses.

See all the photos here

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Architecture, Art, Design, Features, Major Developments, Midtown West, Top Stories

As of today, Penn Station‘s long-awaited West End Concourse–the first tangible step towards Governor Cuomo’s ambitious plan to transform the James A. Farley Post Office into the new Moynihan Train Hall–is open for business, for the first time allowing Amtrak, Long Island Rail Road, and NJ Transit passengers to enter and board trains through the historic building across 8th Avenue. In addition to landscaped entryways, the sparkling new concourse is chock full of LED screens, artwork, and, in true Cuomo fashion, bright, open, and high-tech spaces.

Take the full tour

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Architecture, Art, Art nerd ny, Design, Events, Features

Egg Rolls Egg Cream and Empanadas Festival, Lower East Side cultural events, Museum at Eldridge Street

Egg Rolls, Egg Creams and Empanadas Festival; Photo via Kate Milford for the Museum at Eldridge Street

Art Nerd New York founder Lori Zimmer shares her top art, design and architecture event picks for 6sqft readers!

If you’re feeling low this week, head to Times Square for a round of artful applause, or to the Rubin for some pick me ups thanks to the world of sound. Step back in time (and flex your history knowledge) for a Jazz Age Drink and Draw, then test your modern New York history knowledge at the New York Now Scavenger Hunt. If you’re itching to learn, join a free history tour of Washington Square Park, take in an artist talk by Martha Rosler, then celebrate the diverse history of the Lower East Side at the Egg Rolls, Egg Creams, and Empanadas Festival. Finally, cozy up with a date for Bryant Park’s first screening under the stars with King Kong.

Details on these events and more this way

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Alphabet City, East Village, Features, History, Top Stories

summer of love 1967

Hippies singing and playing music in Washington Square Park in the late 1960s. Photo: Peter Keegan

It has been 50 years since 1967’s “Summer of Love” when young people from around the world flocked to San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district and to other urban neighborhoods, including New York’s East Village, to trip out at psychedelic dance parties, sleep in city parks, and live and do whatever they pleased. While the hippie subculture was already flourishing prior to the Summer of Love, by mid 1967, hippies and their music, style, and communal way of life had caught the attention of the mainstream media and as a result, reached a critical mass of young people who were now eager to ditch their suburban homes to “turn on, tune in, and drop out.”

Reactions to the Summer of Love in New York were predictably mixed. An estimated 50,000 young people descended on the city to join the movement, but many New Yorkers, including longstanding residents, police officers, and politicians, had little interest in spending the Summer of Love soaking up the good vibes. In the end, the city’s Summer of Love saw as much conflict and violence as peace and love, and debates about rental prices, real estate values, and the gentrification of the Lower East Side were all part of the conflict.

find out more here

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City Living, Features, sponsored content

BASIS Independent School Upper East Side

BASIS Independent Manhattan, a K-8 private school teaching the acclaimed BASIS Curriculum, is opening this fall in a 45,000-square-foot school at 795 Columbus Avenue. Although new to NYC, BASIS Curriculum Schools is no strangers to praise. Steadily since 1998, they’ve grown their network to 28 campuses around the world while gathering many accolades, including that of U.S News and World Report. This year, BASIS Curriculum Schools was ranked #5 on the publication’s list of the “Top 10 Best High Schools in the Country.”

Designed with the modern child in mind, BASIS Independent’s upcoming Manhattan campus will feature state-of-the-art facilities that support everything from daily physical education in the elementary grades, multiple recess breaks, weekly engineering sessions, and, for middle school students, the study of chemistry, physics, and biology in a laboratory setting. Indeed, thoughtful spaces designed to elevate performance are at BASIS Independent’s heart, and they work in tandem with the school’s curriculum developed to provide students with the strongest academic foundation—and for a fraction of the tuition expected in NYC, at that. Ahead, Head of School Jesse Rizzo shares how the upcoming New York City schoolhouse has been designed to help create and fortify Manhattan’s next school community.

find out more about BASIS’ Manhattan school here

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Be my roommate, Boerum Hill, Cobble Hill, Features, People

Pacific Street Cobble Hill Apartment, cobble hill real estate, cobble hill apartment, brooklyn apartment

To help our fellow New Yorkers on their hunt for a good roommate, we present “Be My Roommate.” If you have an empty room you’d like to see featured here, get in touch with us at [email protected]!

Meet Marie, a laid-back bookworm searching for a roommate for her Cobble Hill two-bedroom. Marie, a Florida native, moved to the neighborhood just over four years ago after a spending several years in Chicago and more than a year living out of a backpack in Central America. Up until a week ago, she shared her Brooklyn apartment with a friend who has since flown the coop to teach in Paris. This has left Marie with an extra bedroom, and for anyone looking for new digs, a great opportunity to live in one of the city’s best neighborhoods.

Find out more here, plus pics!

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condos, Features, More Top Stories, New Developments, Nolita, Starchitecture, Top Stories

Before 152 Elizabeth Street, Pritzker Prize-winning architect Tadao Ando had never designed a building in New York City. The ultra-high-end, seven-unit, seven-story Nolita condominium is currently on the rise at the corner of Elizabeth and Kenmare Streets. Every detail of this Ando building reflects the famed architect’s philosophy that, “a living space should be a sanctuary. It has to be a place where you can reflect on your life.” Ando’s signature use of concrete and glass creates a strong yet minimalist beauty that finds balance at a location on the convergence of numerous neighborhoods. As architecture critic Carter Horsley puts it, “152 Elizabeth is not a dramatic masterpiece by one of the world’s greatest architects but a very refined and subtle ‘enclosure’ with wonderful detailing, a delightful surprise in this brand new, gee-whiz world of starchitects.”

Read more

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Features, People, The urban lens, Upper West Side 

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, creative and conceptual photographer Kalliope Amorphous shares her series “Upper West Side Story.” Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

“I’m always chasing after something nostalgic and timeless,” says Kalliope Amorphous, which is why her long-time home on the Upper West Side was the perfect setting for a portrait study. “There’s a strong sense of community here and it feels more like a neighborhood in the classic and old-fashioned sense,” the self-taught photographer explains. In this black-and-white series, Kalliope captures the many faces of one of the city’s most historic areas, exploring its long-standing energy and evolving residents, as well as her favorite themes of identity, mortality, time, and consciousness.

See the series here

Featured Story

Architecture, Art, Art nerd ny, Design, Events, Features

Art Nerd New York founder Lori Zimmer shares her top art, design and architecture event picks for 6sqft readers!

This week we wish a very happy birthday to architectural genius Frank Lloyd Wright. Celebrate the event with admission to the Wright-designed Guggenheim for just $1.50! The Transit Museum is also celebrating with 100 years, and the Welling Court Mural Festival celebrates eight! Experience the Philip Johnson Glass House in a whole new way during its summer soiree party, or grab a blanket for The Met Opera’s first free outdoor concert. The River to River Festival kicks off free programming with a performance by The Dance Cartel, and Quiet Lunch Magazine drops another issue with a party. Finally, immerse yourself in an arty evening with Chashama’s gala at the old Vogue offices.
Details on these events and more this way

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