Features

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apartment living 101, City Living, Features, Shop

7 ways to soundproof a noisy apartment

By 6sqft, Wed, September 16, 2020

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

No matter how long we live in New York City, it’s hard to get used to the sounds of jackhammers, children screaming, or our neighbors getting a little too, um, frisky on the other side of our apartment wall. And with noise complaints up a whopping 300 percent during the pandemic, many of us are actively seeking solutions to help muffle (or hopefully mute) these urban intrusions. From sound-proofing wall panels and curtains to white noise machines, we’ve rounded up some simple soundproofing home upgrades, as well as a couple more robust improvements, that will help you achieve a quieter household.

Get started soundproofing here

Featured Story

Events, Features, NYC Guides, Top Stories

The 10 best apple and pumpkin picking spots near NYC

By Rebecca Fishbein, Tue, September 15, 2020

Photo via Pixabay

With autumn in New York City quickly approaching, you can take in the changing leaves and crisp air, and there are few places better to do that than a local farm. Some of the best spots near town offer apple and pumpkin picking, in addition to a slew of other fall-ready activities, making it easy to bring some of the season home with you. Ahead, we’ve rounded up our 10 favorite spots that are open this year with COVID guidelines in place.

Check ’em out!

Featured Story

Cool Listings, Features, real estate trends

With New York City’s listing inventory hitting its highest level in 14 years and net effective rents still falling, according to a new report by real estate appraisers at Miller Samuel, this may be the best time for renters to snag a good deal on an apartment. This week, we’re taking a look at the best rentals currently on the market for under $3,000/month. From a Brooklyn studio with outdoor space and on-site laundry to a bright corner one-bedroom on the Lower East Side, find out just how far $3,000 will get you in NYC right now.

Find your next place

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Events, Features, More Top Stories, NYC Guides

Photo courtesy of The Bel Aire Diner

There’s no word yet on when indoor movie theaters will reopen in New York, but luckily for cinema fans, there is a slew of outdoor, drive-in theaters that are continuing to operate even after Labor Day. From spots right here in Greenpoint and Astoria to those nearby in North Jersey to some cool retro locales a couple hours’ away, we’ve rounded up 13 spots to drive-in, snack on popcorn, and enjoy a good old fashioned movie night.

Check out the list

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Features, History

356 years ago, New Amsterdam became New York City

By Dana Schulz, Tue, September 8, 2020

Jean Leon Gerome Ferris, The Fall of New Amsterdam, Peter Stuyvesant

Jean Leon Gerome Ferris’s painting “The Fall of New Amsterdam, which shows New Amsterdam residents begging Peter Stuyvesant to surrender to the British. Via The Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

On September 8th, 1664, Dutch Director-General Peter Stuyvesant surrendered New Amsterdam to the British, officially establishing New York City. To take part in the fur trade, settlers from the Dutch West India Company first established the colony of New Netherland in 1624, which would eventually grow to include all present-day boroughs, Long Island, and even parts of New Jersey. The following year, the island of Manhattan, then the capital, was named New Amsterdam. But when Stuyvesant’s 17-year run as Governor (from 1647 to 1664) turned unfavorable, he ceded the island to England’s Colonel Richard Nicolls, who had sent four ships with 450 men to seize the Dutch Colony. The name was promptly changed to honor the Duke of York and his mission.

Get the whole history

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Events, Features, More Top Stories, Museums

When it comes to reopenings, we’re seeing a lot of positive news–most major museums will reopen this month, baseball is back, and events are being reimagined. In other cases, reopening is further off–Lincoln Center, Carnegie Hall, and the Met Opera have all cancelled their fall seasons. But whatever the case, 6sqft has put together a list of reopenings, postponements, and cancellations for New York City’s many museums, performance venues, outdoor spaces, and events.

The full list here

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Features, History, holidays, Manhattan

In 1882, Labor Day originated with a parade held in NYC

By Emily Nonko, Fri, September 4, 2020

labor day, first labor day, labor day parade, new york city

An illustration of the first Labor Day parade, via Wiki Commons

Though Labor Day has been embraced as a national holiday–albeit one many Americans don’t know the history of–it originated right here in New York City as a result of the city’s labor unions fighting for worker’s rights throughout the 1800s. The event was first observed, unofficially, on Tuesday, September 5th, 1882, with thousands marching from City Hall up to Union Square. At the time, the New York Times considered the event to be unremarkable. But 137 years later, we celebrate Labor Day on the first Monday of every September as a tribute to all American workers. It’s also a good opportunity to recognize the hard-won accomplishments of New York unions to secure a better workplace for us today.

Keep reading for the full history

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Cool Listings, Features

The best NYC apartments for sale under $500K

By Devin Gannon, Thu, August 27, 2020

Like New York City, the real estate market is slowly starting to recover, with hundreds of new apartment listings posted each day. With some industry experts calling it a buyer’s market due to an increase in inventory citywide, we’re taking a look at some of the best deals for apartments on the market that are listed for under $500,000. From a spacious two-bedroom with a balcony and an outdoor pool in Riverdale to a charming studio with unique architectural details in Prospect Heights, find out what $500,000 can get you in NYC right now.

More here

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Features, Financial District, History, Transportation

Photo © James and Karla Murray

When the New York City subway opened on October 27th, 1904, it was the magnificent City Hall station that served as the backdrop for the festivities, with its arched Guastavino-tiled ceiling and skylights. But by 1945, the newer, longer subway cars could no longer fit on the station’s curved tracks, so it was closed. Today, the New York City Transit Museum occasionally offers tours of the abandoned station, which is how photographers James and Karla Murray were able to capture these beautiful photos. Ahead, see more of the station and learn all about its history.

Read more

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condos, Features, NYC Guides

New York City’s top 30 condos

By 6sqft, Thu, August 20, 2020

From supertall new developments and projects by some of the world’s most famous architects to historic landmarks brought into the 21st century, 6sqft has rounded up the best condo buildings in New York City. Ahead, find out which condominiums made the list and what you can expect in terms of views, amenities, neighborhood, and more.

Read on for a guide to the city’s top condo addresses

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