Features

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City Living, Features, The urban lens

The Urban Lens: Fly over NYC during ‘golden hour’

By Diane Pham, Fri, February 17, 2017

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Alexey Kashpersky takes us above NYC at daybreak. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at tips@6sqft.com.

We couldn’t think of a better day than this frigid Friday to lose ourselves in the warm glow of Manhattan during golden hour. Having ventured where many would dare not go—i.e. several thousand feet up in the air in a doorless helicopter—artist Alexey Kashpersky shares photos of his recent sky-high journey above New York, revealing a glorious metropolis at daybreak shining a fiery red and orange. From the piers of Battery Park City to hovering just above the tip of the Chrysler Building, lose yourself ahead in the quiet beauty of our dear city.

see more here

Featured Story

Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

Image: Jason Wyche, Public Art
In a city where hundreds of interesting events occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top picks for 6sqft readers!

This week, the Red Bull space rechristens itself in style with a massive department store-style installation by Norwegian artist Bjarne Melgaard. Also this week, the Public Art Fund is battling advertisements with a city-wide ad screen takeover by 23 artists, while SVA’s Curatorial MA program hosts a panel about art and commodity. Buff Monster’s ice cream murals delve into the third dimension in a new sculptural pop-up, and William Binnie’s WINTER is coming to LMAK. LES gallery Pierogi welcomes a solo show by Elliott Green, and finally, The Museum of the City of New York celebrates the rich diversity that Muslims have brought to our city for generations in a new exhibit.

More on all the best events this way

Featured Story

City Living, Features, History

Sauna-hot apartments: How to cope without stripping down

By Cait Etherington, Wed, February 15, 2017

From a distance, one may wonder why television characters living in New York City apartments so often appear to wear little at all in the privacy of their own homes. From Archie Bunker’s white undershirts on “All in the Family” to Carrie Bradshaw’s lingerie on “Sex in the City” to Hannah Horvath’s practical skivvies on “Girls,” fictional New Yorkers always seem to be stripping down to the bare essentials regardless of the season. To any real New Yorker, there is an obvious reason why these fictional New Yorkers are so often shown partially clad July or January: New York apartments have a tendency to be sauna hot. But in a city where tenants frequently have to fight for even the most basic amenities, how did heat become overly abundant, even in the dead of winter?

find out more here

Featured Story

Features, People

20 New Yorkers tell 6sqft what they love most about NYC

By Dana Schulz, Tue, February 14, 2017

When you couple recent uncertain times with the gray February weather and frigid temperatures, it can be easy to get bogged down in feeling a bit melancholy. But today is the day of love, and in honor of that, 6sqft asked 20 New Yorkers–from fellow reporters and bloggers to architects and urbanists–what they love most about NYC. From big-picture things like the skyline and street energy to smaller fortunes like having tea with friends and spotting an old ad on the side of the building, there’s plenty here to lift your spirits and make you fall in love with this great city all over again.

All the responses right this way

Featured Story

apartment living 101, Features, Interiors

6sqft’s series Apartment Living 101 is aimed at helping New Yorkers navigate the challenges of creating a happy home in the big city. This week we offer up some tips for couples living together in a tiny pad.

When New York City couples move in together, it often means searching for, or being absorbed into, a modest one-bedroom apartment. For many, taking this plunge will be both exciting (think of all that saved rent!) and excruciating, as sharing a space will mean compromises, fights over housework, and the paring down of personal items so everyone’s stuff can fit.

So for those about to take the plunge—and those who could benefit from a bit more squabble-proofing at home—we’ve culled a list of our favorite self-preservation and storage tips for shacking up in small apartments.

our top tips here

Featured Story

Features, People, photography, The urban lens, Upper East Side

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Sam Golanski gives Park Avenue doormen their moment in the spotlight. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at tips@6sqft.com.

Sam Golanski grew up in a small town in Poland, but has been residing in Manchester, U.K. since 2005. Though he thinks New York is “a tough place to live,” he fell in love with its energy as a child watching films set in Manhattan from the ’60s and ’70s. Now all grown up, he comes to New York frequently to visit friends and work on his urban and social photography projects (“I have to admit I shredded a few pairs of shoes by just walking up and down for days everywhere with my camera bags,” he says). In his series “Park Avenue Doormen,” Sam gives the men who safeguard the Upper East Side’s ritziest buildings an opportunity to step from behind the velvet ropes and in front of the camera.

See all the photos

Featured Story

Features, History

Charles Lewis Tiffany (left) in his Union Square store, with Charles T. Cook, in 1887

The recent shake-up at Tiffany, involving the replacement of CEO Frederic Cumenal and the departure of its design director, is said to be predicated on disappointing sales and a resultant decline in share prices. Since last fall, many upscale shops in the area have complained about a negative impact they felt was caused by the hullabaloo around Trump Tower—both rubber-necking and security barricades. A change in marketing emphasis toward a younger consumer—witness the hiring of Lady Gaga for advertising—and designs reflecting that shift are reportedly in the offing to reverse disappointing balance-sheet figures. Not everyone is worried, though. Tiffany & Co. has weathered many a storm in its 180 years, and the ambiance on the floor is still serene, the merchandise still beautiful. For a sense of perspective, and just in time for Valentine’s Day, 6sqft looks at Tiffany’s history.

The full story, right this way

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Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

Art Nerd New York’s top event picks for 2/9-2/15

By Lori Zimmer, Thu, February 9, 2017

Second Avenue Subway, New York Transit Museum, The Center for Architecture, SAY IT LOUD, Amy Kao, Brookfield Place, Robert Malmberg, DK Johnston, the Quin, work x work, Wythe Hotel, Central Park Ice Festival, Rough Textures, Artists & Fleas, Love in Times Square

In a city where hundreds of interesting events occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top picks for 6sqft readers!

Love is in the air with Valentine’s Day around the corner, and Times Square is proving that Love Trumps Hate with a day of weddings, engagements and of course public art. Brookfield Place is celebrating the Chinese Lunar New Year with a site specific installation by Amy Kao, and the New York Transit Museum is celebrating the long-awaited opening of the Second Avenue Subway. The Center for Architecture is highlighting 20 talented African American Architects, and there’s a 6,000-pound ice spectacle to be found in Central Park. More details on these events and a flurry of others ahead.
More on all the best events this way

Featured Story

Events, Features, holidays

Roses and chocolate are nice, but why go the traditional route when the city has so much more to offer for Valentine’s Day. Show your significant other, spouse, or best friend how much they mean to you with one of these ten alternative events that 6sqft rounded up throughout the city. From a wastewater treatment plant tour, to after-hours museum visits, to a romantic evening at the planetarium, these are the perfect ideas for urbanists, historians, and art lovers.

All the events this way

Featured Story

Features, Sunset Park

Industry City, Design Week, ICFF, Sunset Park, Brooklyn, NYC

At its peak in 1950, the city’s garment industry employed 323,669 New Yorkers. By 2000, this number had dropped to 59,049, and in 2015, it was less than half that with just 22,626 residents “making apparel, accessories, and finished textile products,” reports the Times. The struggling trade, long centered in the area bound by 5th/9th Avenues and 35th/41st Streets, has fallen victim not only to national trends of work being shipped overseas, but local issues like rising rents, outdated facilities, and competition from tech and media companies. But thanks to a collaboration between the city and the Council of Fashion Designers of America, a “new, modern garment district” is taking hold in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, where several industrial conversions offer cheaper rents, better equipped real estate, and a creative, collaborative community

Much more on the shift

Featured Story

Features, History

Excavating the city: A look at urban archaeology in New York

By Cait Etherington, Tue, February 7, 2017

When most people think about archaeologists, they imagine outdoorsy adventurers—perhaps, modeled on the fictional Indiana Jones—uncovering ancient artifacts in remote locations. They probably don’t imagine archaeologists riding the MTA to excavation sites.

In reality, archaeologists frequently do work in New York City and the surrounding region and play an essential yet often under-recognized role in the city’s building industry. While many new developments go ahead without major archaeological studies, most developments only get the green light to move forward after archaeologists have completed at least a preliminary investigation.

how archaeologist work in urban environments like NYC

Featured Story

Features, real estate trends

For many years, New York developers have been working to design family-friendly buildings. As a result, it is now common for new buildings to include playrooms and wading pools. Okay, but what about teens? While buyers often spend considerable time searching for baby- and child-friendly apartments, teenagers’ needs have historically been overlooked. But this doesn’t mean that teens don’t have strong opinions on housing too.

WHAT SEVEN TEENS HAD TO SAY…

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Interviews, Midtown East, Urban Design

one vanderbilt architects

There are a number of towers on the rise poised to change the New York City skyline, but few are anticipated to have an impact as significant as One Vanderbilt. Developed by SL Green and designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF), the glassy supertall will extend an incredible 1,401 feet into the clouds to become the city’s third tallest tower (following One World Trade Center and the in-progress Central Park Tower) while also bringing a staggering 1.7 million square feet of office space to Midtown Manhattan. But beyond its height and girth, this massive development is expected to elevate its surroundings a profound way. Indeed, the enshadowed “iconic but aging” district surrounding Grand Central, long-deprived of public space and life beyond weary commuters, will be turned into a verdant block dedicated to all New Yorkers.

6sqft’s interview with the architects this way

Featured Story

Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

#midnightmoment, Times Square Arts, Blue Moon, Alex Da Corte, Marie Antoinette’s Head, National Arts Club, Leonard Autie, New York City Ballet, Santtu Nustonen, Untapped Cities, subway tour, Spoke Art, The Art of Food, SOthebys’ Geoffrey Zakarian, Times Square Valentine Heart Design Competition, The Office For Creatiev Research, Rubin Museum of Art

In a city where hundreds of interesting events occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top picks for 6sqft readers!

Times Square is abuzz this month with a new film by Alex Da Corte for #Midnightmoment and the unveiling of the annual Valentine’s sculpture—this year’s piece an interactive work that honors the diversity that immigrants have brought to New York. Also this week, head to the National Arts Club for all the gossip Marie Antoinette shared with hairdresser; check out minimalist illustrators at Spoke Art; then stop by Lincoln Center for this year’s New York City Ballet artist collaboration. Untapped Cities is also offering an underground adventure that will take curious straphangers into the depths of the NYC Subway. Finally, treat yourself to the decadence that is The Art of Food at Sotheby’s, an evening of delicious treats inspired by master artworks made by leading chefs!

More on all the best events this way

Featured Story

Features, Financial District, History

In the light of Donald Trump’s ban on Syrian refugees, 6sqft decided to take a look back at Little Syria. From the late 1880s to the 1940s, the area directly south of the World Trade Center centered along Washington Street held the nation’s first and largest Arabic settlement. The bustling community was full of Turkish coffee houses, pastry shops, smoking parlors, dry goods merchants, and silk stores, but the Immigration Act of 1924 (which put limits on the number of immigrants allowed to enter the U.S. from a given country and altogether banned Asians and Arabs) followed by the start of construction on the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel in 1940, caused this rich enclave to disappear. And though few vestiges remain today, there’s currently an exhibit on Little Syria at the Metropolitan College of New York, and the Department of Parks and Recreation is building a new park to commemorate the literary figures associated with the historic immigrant community.

The full history and details on the new developments

Featured Story

apartment living 101, Design, Features

12 unique wallpaper ideas for renters and homeowners at every budget

By Elizabeth Finkelstein, Tue, January 31, 2017

6sqft’s series Apartment Living 101 is aimed at helping New Yorkers navigate the challenges of creating a happy home in the big city. This week we get tips from historic interiors expert Elizabeth Finkelstein, founder of CIRCA, a curated historic house marketplace showcasing the most beautiful old homes for sale all across the country, and columnist at Country Living Magazine. She’s rounded up some fun, beautiful, and modern wall treatments for renters and homeowners at every budget.

If comparing paint samples makes you blue in the face (yes, there are indeed over fifty shades of grey), why not opt for wallpaper instead? It’s fun, it’s an instant conversation-starter, and we promise it’ll look the same in every light. Grandma’s favorite decorating staple is undergoing a fresh, modern renaissance–and thanks to some innovative artists designing with the renter in mind, it’s easier than ever to install. From peel-and-stick options to those you can roll on with a brush, we’ve rounded up our favorite wall treatments for every budget!

See our top 12 picks here

Featured Story

Features, Policy, real estate trends

Dr. Ben Carson, a retired neurosurgeon and failed Republican nominee, has now been cleared to serve as Secretary of Housing for the next four years. For many, his appointment remains perplexing. Carson has no political experience and no obvious knowledge of housing and development issues. At least some concerns about Carson’s fitness for the job were put to rest during his Senate hearing on January 12. Beyond a contentious exchange with Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, Carson dodged any major attacks. Still, there is no question that under Carson’s direction, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) will roll out a series of changes over the coming four years. While some changes will impact housing and development in New York City, Carson’s influence is expected to be minor.

READ THE FULL STORY AT CITYREALTY…

Featured Story

Features, photography, The urban lens

Village East Cinema, Yiddish Rialto, Louis N. Jaffe Theater

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, award-winning photographers James and Karla Murray return with a look inside the spectacular Village East Cinema. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at tips@6sqft.com.

Moviegoers at the Village East Cinema may be surprised to learn that they are visiting a recently restored New York City designated landmark. The Village East Cinema has a fascinating history as one of the last surviving “Yiddish Rialto” theaters along Second Avenue in the East Village. Today, the cinema is known for premiering many independent films and an eclectic mix of art and commercial releases. The theater’s most significant visual aspect, however, is its main auditorium’s ornate and colorful ceiling, which is regarded as having one of the most remarkable works of plaster craftsmanship in New York City.

explore the spectacular space here

Featured Story

Art, Art nerd ny, Cool Listings, Features

Patrick Kwan

In a city where hundreds of interesting happenings occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top event picks for 6sqft readers!

This week, take home a piece of Logan Hicks’ Bowery Wall at Taglialatella Gallery or a piece of Aurelie Guillaume’s jewelry at Reinstein Rose. Then experience the quiet beauty of horses at Emmanuel Fremin Gallery and express yourself at the Brooklyn Museum’s Art History Happy hour. Also this week, Korean artist Hyon Gyon gives insight into her latest exhibition at a talk at Shin Gallery, and Ricky Gervais hits the Times Center for what’s sure to be a thought-provoking conversation. Finally, let out some aggression at the Lunar New Year Chinese Firecracker Festival and then wind down in the beautiful Albertine for a talk on the city everyone seems to be moving to, Los Angeles.
More on all the best events this way

Featured Story

apartment living 101, Design, Features

7 easy ways to feng shui your apartment

By Hannah Frishberg, Wed, January 25, 2017

As intangible a concept as feng shui may seem, it all comes down to the basic idea of having a space you’re happy to come home to because its energy is positive. “Feng shui is an ancient philosophy about how you can improve your life and create a space that supports and nurtures you,” explained Anjie Cho, a New York-based architect, author, and founder of online mindfulness design blog and shop Holistic Spaces. Indeed, adjusting your apartment in just a few small and informed ways can make all the difference in the look and feel of your unit and, resultantly, your own wellbeing. Ahead are some ideas you can apply to your space, straight from a pro.

First off, take that mattress off the floor

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