Features

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Construction Update, Design, Features, Museums

statue of liberty, statue of liberty museum, liberty island

With the construction of the new Statue of Liberty Museum in its final stages, 6sqft on Tuesday toured the 26,000-square-foot site and its landscaped rooftop. This is the first ground-up building overseen by the Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, the nonprofit which has raised $100 million in private funds for the project. Designed by FXCollaborative with exhibits created by ESI Design, the angular-shaped museum will feature three immersive gallery spaces with one wing showcasing the Statue of Liberty’s original torch and the iconic monument framed behind it through floor-to-ceiling glass.

See its progress

Featured Story

Features, History

St. Paul’s Chapel via Flickr cc

Tis the season to voluntarily spook oneself out, but if haunted houses and tourist-friendly ghost tours aren’t your thing, New York’s bustling burrows are home to a slew of the more naturally born spirits. You’ll find Dracula’s extended family on 23rd Street, a host of oracles on Orchard Street, and the site of the cruel crime that led to the nation’s first recorded murder trial on Spring Street. If you’re searching for a necropolis in the metropolis, here are ten of the best sites in New York to spot specters.

See all the haunted haunts here!

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Bushwick, Features, Interiors, My SQFT House Tours, Top Stories

6sqft’s series “My sqft” checks out the homes of New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to designer Stella Rose’s bubblegum pink Bushwick apartment. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

“Why not make your living space look like a party every day?” says fashion designer, stylist, and model Stella Rose Saint Clair. And that’s exactly what she did in her unapologetically pink Bushwick apartment. In fact, she’s painted every NYC apartment she’s lived in this same hue because it makes her feel “optimistic, rebellious, wacky.” When asked to sum up her fun and festive aesthetic, she explained, “I love over-the-top vintage interiors and the retro obsession around pink for household decorating. I am also a sucker for tropical plants and party supplies.”

From the Rococo sofa she found on Craigslist and bought from an eccentric divorcée on Staten Island to the collection of vintage food packaging in the kitchen, everything in Stella’s apartment has a story, many of which will make you laugh. But behind the giggles and bubblegum walls, Stella is not afraid to get real–“I don’t have my shit together, and I’m okay with it.”–and take a serious look at how obstacles in her life, such as being bullied as a teen, have shaped her into the creative force she is today. Ahead, take a tour of Stella’s one-of-a-kind apartment and get to know her a bit better.

Take the tour!

Featured Story

Art, Features, Financial District, Manhattan

Photo via LMCC

When the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council (LMCC) was founded in 1973, it set out to bring the arts to Lower Manhattan, a neighborhood that already had an established reputation for being first and foremost a site of business, not pleasure. What the organization’s founder, Flory Barnett, could not have foreseen at the time of the LMCC’s founding is that over the coming four decades, Lower Manhattan would face more challenges than nearly any other New York City neighborhood.

From the attacks on 9/11 to the devastating fallout of the 2008 economic crisis to the occupation of Zuccotti Park in 2011, in recent years, Lower Manhattan has been at the epicenter of some of the city’s and nation’s most historic moments. Throughout these events, the LMCC has persisted and in many respects, played a pivotal role in helping the neighborhood transition into the vibrant and diverse neighborhood it is today: a place where people not only work but also live and spend their leisure time.

Find out more

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Events, Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History

Open House New York in Greenwich Village: The history of three unique sites

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, October 11, 2018

Among the many delights included in this weekend’s Open House New York will be three iconic Greenwich Village buildings–a Gothic Revival church with many architectural firsts, a library that was originally a courthouse which heard the “Trial of the Century,” and a groundbreaking artists’ housing complex that was formerly home to Bell Telephone Labs and the site where color television was invented. These extraordinary landmarks span three centuries of American history, reflecting the evolution of our city’s spiritual, artistic, industrial, scientific, and civic life.

Learn more about their unique histories

Featured Story

Features, Lower East Side, Where I Work

Mendel Goldberg Fabrics, Lower East Side fabric store, NYC fabric store

6sqft’s series “Where I Work” takes us into the studios, offices, and businesses of New Yorkers across the city. In this installment, we’re going inside 130-year-old Lower East Side shop Mendel Goldberg FabricsWant to see your business featured here? Get in touch!

Mendel Goldberg Fabrics, a fourth-generation family-owned textile boutique, has been in business since 1890 and is located on a quiet side street on the Lower East Side. People who walk down Hester Street often take the time to notice the exquisite designer imported fabrics that hang in the window display as well as the huge range of brocades, silk, gabardine, lace, wool, novelty fabrics and boucle´ in a wide variety of colors and textures, which line the shops walls from floor to ceiling. Despite a devastating fire in the building in 2012 that destroyed the entire basement fabric stock and required substantial rebuilding, the business is thriving. On a recent visit to the fabric store, we had a chance to speak with Alice Goldberg, the great-granddaughter of Mendel Goldberg, about how the business went from a pushcart to a unique destination, the joys of running one of the oldest surviving shops in the neighborhood, and the secrets of some of their most high-end fabrics.

Get a fabric lesson from Alice

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City Living, Events, Features, holidays, Top Stories

Trick-or-treating in Brooklyn, via Flickr cc

Once again this year, in addition to the annual Village Halloween Parade, October 31st promises to bring out a veritable parade of pint-sized, adorably costumed youngsters hell-bent on scoring treats and scaring parents and each other. While urban trick-or-treating is nothing like the suburban version, it has its perks (apartment buildings can be like hitting the jackpot)–and its fair share of friendly neighbors, stores, businesses and neighborhood events. Technology–local-social site Nextdoor has a trick-or-treat map that neighbors can add themselves to if they’re handing out candy–makes things easier and safer. Like so many other topics, New Yorkers love to argue over which neighborhoods offer the best bounty. Below are a few picks among the least tricky with the best treats.

Where the treats are this Halloween

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Features, Interviews, Museums, Transportation

Concetta Bencivenga, new york transit museum

Photo by Marc Hermann, courtesy of the New York Transit Museum

Concetta Anne Bencivenga wants you to visit the New York Transit Museum. After coming on as the museum’s director early last year — following Gabrielle Shubert’s impressive 24-year run — she’s become “cheerleader in chief,” in her own words, excited to promote the museum’s exhibits and programming to a wide range of New Yorkers.

With 6sqft she discusses how her diverse background brought her to the Transit Museum and what the past of New York’s public transportation can teach us about moving forward. She also talks about the revamp of an existing exhibit, the introduction of new ones, and her goals moving forward as director. Do you know why the MTA subway system is featured so prominently in early comic books? Keep reading, as Concetta shares the reasons why public transit is so crucial to New Yorkers lives — in both the obvious and more surprising ways.

Meet Concetta

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Architecture, Features, History

10 of NYC’s most impressive Terra-cotta buildings

By Lucie Levine, Thu, October 4, 2018

Terra-cotta, Latin for “fired earth,” is an ancient building material, made of baked clay, first used throughout early civilizations in Greece, Egypt, China the Indus Valley. In more modern times, architects realized that “fired earth” actually acts as a fire-deterrent. In the age of the skyscraper, terra-cotta became a sought-after fire-proof skin for the steel skeletons of New York’s tallest buildings. In the early part of the 20th century, the City’s most iconic structures were decked out in terracotta.

You’ll find terra-cotta on famous facades from the Flatiron to the Plaza, but the material often flies under the radar of pedestrians and architecture buffs alike because it can mimic other materials, like cast-iron or carved wood. Now, this long-underappreciated material is getting its due. On October 24th, the Historic Districts Council will present its annual Landmarks Lion Award to the terra-cotta firms Boston Valley Terra Cotta and Gladding, McBean, which work to keep terra-cotta alive worldwide, and to the preservation organization Friends of Terra Cotta, which has worked to preserve New York’s architectural terra-cotta since 1981. The ceremony will take place at Grand Central’s Oyster Bar, under the magnificent Guastavino terra-cotta ceiling recently restored by Boston Valley Terra Cotta. Fired up about finding “fired earth” around town? Here are 10 of the most impressive examples of New York terra-cotta!

Learn more about New York’s Terra Cotta Treasures

Featured Story

Events, Features, Giveaways

Open House New York Weekend is back for its 16th year from Friday, October 12th through Sunday the 13th, with an impressive roster of tours, events, and access to typically off-limits sites. Yesterday, reservations went live for the 123 reservation-only sites, but there are also close to 150 open-access sites, including the Brooklyn Navy Yard, the Dime Savings Bank of Brooklyn, and several architecture offices. And while these open-access sites don’t require reservations, the lines can build up. Which is why 6sqft has teamed up with Untapped Cities and fellow partner Brooklyn Based for a giveaway of two OHNY Weekend Passports, a VIP pin that lets you and a guest have front-of-the-line admittance!

Enter here

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