Technology

Technology, Transportation

Technicon, IXION windowless jet

Admit it–you’ve perfected your selfie pose. And now that you’ve got the duck face and skinny arm down pat, why not explore the art of the skyline selfie? We’re not talking an upward-gazing shot of the Empire State Building or semi-panoramic view of Manhattan; we mean full-on aerial photos taken from 40,000 feet up in the air. That’s exactly what the IXION windowless jet from Technicon Design is doing.

The firm’s groundbreaking new design has removed windows from the cabin and, using near-future technology, displays the surrounding environment on interior cabin surfaces via external cameras. Not only does this provide incredible views, but greens the aircraft by reducing weight (thereby requiring less fuel and maintenance), simplifying construction, and opening doors for a variety of design possibilities. To boot, expansive solar panels would power the on-board, low-voltage systems, creating a one-of-a-kind visual for the jet’s exterior body.

More on the sky-high design here

Architecture, Green Design, Technology, Video

Sunbreak Shades, NBBJ architects, solar shades, skyscraper climate control

You know the drill, wear a wool sweater to work in the summer and layer with a thin t-shirt in the winter. It’s the curse of working in a tall, glassy, climate-controlled building. But a new shading prototype called Sunbreak, created by the architects at NBBJ, acts as a skyscraper skin that adjusts on a window-by-window basis depending on the angle of the sun, conserving energy and allowing workers to control office temperatures. Sounds like just what we’ve been waiting for, huh?

More about the proposed product

Green Design, Technology

3D-Printing, PolyBricks, Jenny Sabin Studio, 3D-printed construction materials

3D printing has been making the design rounds lately, popping up as the construction method of choice for many new furniture pieces. Now, though, a team of researchers has created a 3D-printed product that can be used to construct entire buildings. Developed by the Sabin Design Lab in collaboration with Cornell and Jenny Sabin Studio, the ceramic bricks are interlocking and require no mortar, the first of their kind. Additionally, the technology eliminates construction waste completely.

More about the one-of-a-kind product here

maps, Social Media, Technology

Vincent Meertens' Subjective Map of NYC created

Social media has certainly made it easier to take a nostalgic look back in time; a quick perusal of one’s past Facebook statuses or Twitter feeds is all it takes to remind us of what we were doing last week, month, or even last year. (Yes, we know some of those photos are cringe-worthy; we have them too.) Consider all of the different places those statuses and tweets were generated from, and imagine what it might look like if you tracked all of those locations on a map of the city – a literal “walk” down memory lane, if you will.

That’s exactly what Dutch graphic designer Vincent Meertens and his girlfriend did between March 2012 and January 2013, using an application called OpenPaths. The result? An intricate series of dots and lines (10,760 data points in all) representing all of their movements through New York City.

More details ahead

Technology

AquaFence, 2 Water Street, flood barriers, NYC storm prevention

Nearing the two-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy, developers, architects, and building owners are still wrestling with how to keep their waterfront properties safe from any future storms that may wash up on New York’s shores. Some have moved mechanical systems above ground, white others have installed heavy duty generators and emergency lighting and elevator systems. But a popular preventative mechanism among the posh residences of the West Village and Lower Manhattan is AquaFence, a portable, temporary flood barrier system that can defend structures from flood heights of up to eight feet.

See how this product is constructed and installed

Green Design, Technology

Solar Cells, solar energy, green energy

You may have heard last year that scientists began exploring the idea of spray-paintable solar cells, and now researchers at Sheffield University in England have made a breakthrough that could bring this green energy dream one step closer to reality.

The advance comes from the use of organometal halide perkovskite, a mineral/crystal, organic/metal hydra, which offers the potential to combine high-performing, mature solar cell technologies with organic photovoltaics that have a low embedded energy cost.

More on the technology ahead

Architecture, Technology

tinder for architecture

Don’t get too excited. That’s architecture, not architects. But either way, if you’re an architect, or just an opinionated architecture enthusiast, you’ll love “swiping” left or right on this fun new app developed by Daniele Quercia and her team at Yahoo Labs in Barcelona, Spain.

Find out more here

Design, Products, Technology

QLOCKTWO TOUCH designed by Biegert & Funk

Forget numbers, this quirky clock is using a far more innovative method to tell time. Instead of numerals, the QLOCKTWO employs common phrases — such as “It’s half-past twelve” — to keep you up to speed with the hour.

Details on the unique timepiece here

maps, Technology, Urban Design

As New Yorkers we’re constantly on the go and our movements are very much the pulse of the city. A new smartphone app developed by Human is tracking these movements and turning them into an incredible map that beautifully visualizes how we navigate our streets. Are you part of the pack?

Find out more here

Design, DUMBO, Products, Technology

DIWire designed by Pensa Labs

In a day and age when printers give us the ability to create 3D models, we’re surprised that it’s taken so long for a machine like the DIWire to hit the market. Developed by the creative tinkerers of PENSA, this sleek gadget’s seemingly simple job — to bend wires with a click of a button — is an absolute game-changer for DIY enthusiasts.

See how the DIWire works

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