Technology

City Living, immigration, Technology

Photo courtesy of LinkNYC

The city’s 1,742 LinkNYC Wi-Fi kiosks are the site of a new campaign to highlight facts and photographs related to immigrants’ impact on New York City’s life and culture. “City of Immigrants” will feature historic photos from the Associated Press, along with facts from the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs’ annual report. For example, did you know 52% of NYC businesses are immigrant-owned, or that nearly half of the city’s population speaks a language other than English at home?

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Featured Story

Features, History, Technology, Williamsburg

Willis Carrier, Air conditioning, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, inventions, history

Shown in the Carrier plant in 1922, the first centrifugal chiller opened the door to large-scale comfort air conditioning. Image courtesy of United Technologies/Carrier.

It figures, but history shows us yet another way Brooklyn was cool, like, forever–though this particular example is a bit more literal. A classic New York City heat wave was just enough to turn up the Brooklyn ingenuity in a junior engineer named Willis Carrier, who devised a system of fans, ducts, heaters and perforated pipes that became the world’s first air conditioner. The problem: blistering temperatures that were literally melting the equipment in a Williamsburg printing house. The solution was one that had eluded centuries of inventors through sweltering summers. The system was installed in the summer of 1902, according to the New York Times, and Carrier went on to found Carrier Corporation. He had hit on the idea while walking in the fog.

It’s the humidity

Technology, Transportation

Via MTA on Flickr

After a six-month development process, which included working with over 2,000 commuters, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority launched on Monday a smartphone app that offers real-time updates for the subway, buses and trains, as well as trip planning options and service updates. Because the app, called MyMTA, is a beta version, the MTA is asking for feedback from straphangers about the app’s functions and what needs to be added or improved. The authority also gave their website a much-needed upgrade, with a more sleeker web interface.

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Technology, Transportation

The slow death of the MetroCard begins next spring

By Michelle Colman, Thu, June 14, 2018

MTA, NYC subway, phone scanner

Photo via Phil Hollenback/Flickr

It’s the end of an era but one that might not be too sentimental. As of May 2019, the MTA is launching its new fare payment method for the 4, 5, and 6 lines and all bus routes on Staten Island, reports amNY. No more steel bars karate chopping your abdomen when you realize your MetroCard is out of credit. Starting next spring, riders can use credit cards, mobile phones, smart watches, and mobile wallets to travel… but you’ll still be able to swipe your old MetroCard until 2023. Read more

Architecture, Design, Technology, Transportation

Uber has lofty goals- literally. 6sqft previously reported on the ride-sharing company’s partnership with NASA to develop software to operate their “flying Ubers” for uberAIR by 2023. Clearly, flying Ubers need somewhere to takeoff and land, so yesterday, at their second annual elevate conference in Los Angeles, the company revealed the top six Skyport conceptual designs that are just as futuristic as the flying taxi concept itself.

Could these land in NYC?

Green Design, Sunset Park, Technology

Via Wiki Commons

Move over Chicago, you’re no longer the only windy city – Brooklyn is about to get its own wind. Deepwater Wind, the nation’s leading wind-power developer, intends to build an assembly hub in Sunset Park to support the nation’s future largest offshore wind farm 30 miles east of Montauk (h/t Brooklyn Daily Eagle). This project is part of Governor Cuomo’s ambitious “Clean Energy Standard,” which intends to generate 50 percent of the state’s electricity supply from renewable sources by 2030. The Brooklyn factory is expected to generate $80 million in economic activity and create hundreds of jobs for the area.

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Architecture, Green Design, Technology

Image © Mengyi Fan

Pixel architects, Oliver Thomas and Keyan Rahimzadeh, designed “pixel façade,” a flexible biophilic façade system for the next generation of offices, acknowledging millennials strong desire to be happy in a conducive, natural workplace. Inspired by a Metals in Construction competition challenge, the duo designed a hypothetical building in Williamsburg with a strong connection to nature to house tech startups. Thomas told designboom: “the idea was to propose conceptual but realistic ideas for built products for the future.”

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Featured Story

Features, real estate trends, stuff you should know, Technology

NYC skyline via Pexels; Bitcoin via Pexels

Just when you think you understand the world of cryptos, all you understand is how little you know. And when you do actually master a topic, it will change. Which is why to get you started, we’ve put together a 101 guide to cryptocurrencies and real estate transactions. From the technology behind digital currencies such as Bitcoin to their risks, the real estate market is ripe for potential when it comes to this burgeoning market.

Get your primer ahead

Central Park South, real estate trends, Technology

Photo via Wally Gobetz/Flickr

Cryptocurrencies make the wild west look tame. Yet despite their volatility, they’re becoming more of a presence in NYC real estate. Five days ago, when we reported on the first Bitcoin closings in Manhattan, the value of Bitcoin was $8,592. It is currently $7,999. According to a CNBC report, Chimera, a group of foreign investors interested in buying the Plaza Hotel, is considering offering partial payment for the transaction in a new cryptocurrency. Chimera has proposed the creation of the “Plaza Token,” an asset-backed securitized token, to raise more than $375 million. They are being advised about this initial coin offering by a company called Securitize. “This would give cryptocurrency investors the chance to diversify into luxury real estate and receive certain concessions inside the Plaza Hotel,” CNBC reports.

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real estate trends, Technology

Bitcoin hits the NYC real estate market for the first time

By Michelle Colman, Thu, March 22, 2018

389 East 89th Street © Evan Joseph and an image of Bitcoin via Pexels

Yesterday, the New York Post reported that real estate developer Ben Shaoul of Magnum Real Estate Group has two units under Bitcoin contract at 389 East 89th Street–the first condos to use the payment method in NYC. One unit is a 624-square-foot studio that was asking $875,000, and the second is a 989-square-foot one-bedroom plus den that was asking $1.48 million. And according to Brick Underground, there are already a few very entrepreneurial landlords Brooklyn accepting Bitcoin for rent payment.

What does the future of Bitcoin and real estate look like?

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