Green Design

Cool Listings, Green Design, Upstate

All renderings by S3 Architecture, courtesy Corcoran Country Living

Sylvan Rock is a new micro compound being designed in partnership by S3 Architecture and Aston Martin. Located in the Dutchess County town of Milan, the 55-acre property was conceptualized as a nature-first retreat that focuses on sustainability and wellness with an eye towards self-contained living. To that end, there is the nearly 6,000-square-foot main house, three guest pods, a treehouse, two reflecting pools, a pool house with a wellness pavilion, a pond, and an agricultural food garden.

Tour the whole property

Architecture, Green Design, Roosevelt Island

All renderings via Rescubika Studio

In response to the idea of the “city of tomorrow,” one that will become carbon neutral by 2050, French architecture firm Rescubika created a proposal for a 2,418-foot tower on Roosevelt Island. With wood construction materials, 36 wind turbines, 8,300 shrubs, 1,600 trees, 83,000 square feet of plant walls, and nearly 23,000 square feet of solar panels, it would be the world’s tallest “carbon sink” tower–one that absorbs more CO2 than it releases.

See more here

Cool Listings, Crown Heights, Green Design

Photos by Katherine Marks

When 6sqft took a tour of model Summer Rayne Oakes‘ apartment in 2016, her home was filled with more than 500 plants. Today, that collection has grown to 1,100 and Summer has written a book on how to “cultivate green space in your home and heart.” Most recently, she took this idea and applied her style to a studio apartment at the new Crown Heights condo 111 Montgomery Sreet (h/t NY Post). Listed for $499,000, the apartment is a cool mix of contemporary finishes, boho decor, and, of course, plants galore.

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Design, Flatiron, Green Design

Courtesy of WATG

During the height of the coronavirus pandemic in New York City, fewer cars were on the road, leading to cleaner air and less noise pollution. And with nearly everything temporarily shut down, New Yorkers sought solace in open green spaces, parks, and open streets closed to cars. As the city is in the midst of reopening, WATG, a global multidisciplinary design firm, has proposed a plan to make the streets of New York greener while helping small businesses recover in the process.

More here

Design, Green Design, Greenpoint

Rendering courtesy of Abel Bainnson Butz, LLP.

The city’s plan to bring a waterfront park and small beach to Greenpoint is moving forward. The Parks and Waterfront Committee of Brooklyn’s Community Board 1 earlier this month approved a revised design from New York City Parks and architect firm Abel Bainnson Butz for a 1.9-acre passive park at Bushwick Inlet Park. The nearly $10 million project redevelops and remediates a section of land known a the Motiva parcel, which is bounded by Kent Avenue and Quay Street and North 14th Streets.

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Financial District, Green Design, Landscape Architecture

battery playscape, the battery, nyc parks

The “bluffs” zone includes five granite slides and boulder scrambles; renderings courtesy of BKSK Architects & Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Planners

As the threat of climate change grows, parks in New York City are working to become more resilient. Officials on Thursday broke ground on an $18.3 million waterfront playground at the Battery in the Financial District. The Battery Playscape, as it’s being called, is expected to be one of the city’s largest sustainable parks. It will triple the size of the current playground and will feature a rainwater runoff system and a wide variety of durable plants.

See the design

Architecture, Green Design, Nolita

butterfly sanctuary, monarch sanctuary, terreform one, nolita, 23 cleveland place, architecture

Renderings courtesy of Terreform ONE, Mitchell Joachim, PhD

Architecture and urban design research group Terreform ONE has offered a proposal for a 12-story commercial building in the works across from Petrosino Square in Nolita that goes beyond any of the city’s existing architectural curveballs, angles, and anomalies. The non-profit group has revealed plans to create an eight-story-high monarch butterfly sanctuary, or “Lepidoptera terrarium,” that would serve as the building’s façade and line its atrium.

More sanctuary in the city, this way

Featured Story

apartment living 101, Features, Green Design, More Top Stories, Shop

The 10 best plants for apartment dwellers

By Rebecca Paul, Tue, February 25, 2020

Photo by Brina Blum on Unsplash

From purifying the air to making your apartment feel more welcoming and alive, there are a multitude of reasons to incorporate plants into your home decor. However, for many of us, keeping these precious specimens alive can be a small but legitimate challenge—especially when space and natural sunlight is limited (like many apartments in New York City). To make the commitment to caring for and sustaining the life of greenery a bit easier, we’ve put together this list of special and very sturdy plants perfect for apartment dwellers like yourself.

Read more

Art, Events, Green Design, Roosevelt Island

Figment, ENYA, SEAoNY, city of dreams pavilion, art, public art, design, roosevelt island, architecture, competition, design competition

Rendering courtesy of Murr Architekten

Arts organization FIGMENT, the Emerging New York Architects Committee (ENYA) of the American Institute of Architects New York Chapter (AIANY), and the Structural Engineers Association of New York (SEAoNY) have just announced the finalists in the 2020 City of Dreams Pavilion Design Competition. The competition is an annual program that invites designers to create a temporary architectural pavilion that is efficient and sustainable while considering the life cycle of the building materials used. This year’s pavilion will be in Lighthouse Park on Roosevelt Island.

See more of the winning entries

Green Design, Landscape Architecture, Policy, Technology

flooding, climate change, superstorm sandy, nyc weather

Flooded Battery Park Tunnel after Hurricane Sandy. Image: Timothy Krause via Flickr.

barrier wall proposed by the Army Corps of Engineers as one of several options being evaluated to shield the New York area from rare storms–which may well become less rare and more destructive with global warming–is the subject of a heated debate among planners and environmental experts. Supporters suggest that a barrier be constructed in the outer New York Harbor where it’s mostly hidden from view, saying it would go the farthest in protecting people, land and valuable landmarks along the waterfront from a storm surge. Others fear the idea is a short-sighted measure that doesn’t address major climate threats–and could even worsen matters by trapping sewage and toxins during flooding from high tides and storm runoff. President Donald Trump, however, remains the sole proponent of the mop-and-bucket approach, as the New York Daily News reports.

What will save us from a tweetstorm?

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Archtober2020