Green Design

affordable housing, Bronx, Green Design, housing lotteries

bedford green house, nycha, affordable housing

Rendering of the Bedford Green House courtesy of Edelman Sultan Knox Wood/Architects LLP and Hollister Construction Services

A Bronx affordable housing development with lots of green perks launched a lottery this week for 46 units. Dubbed the Bedford Green House, the 13-story building at 2865 Creston Avenue offers its residents unique amenities that center around healing through nature, a concept called biophilic design. Bedford Green House, located within the Bedford Park neighborhood, will have a rooftop aquaponics greenhouse where residents will be able to raise fish, grow fresh produce, and participate in healthy cooking demos. Qualifying New Yorkers earning 60 percent of the area median income can apply for the units, ranging from $883/month studios to a $1,148/month two-bedrooms.

Do you qualify?

Crown Heights, Design, Green Design, Museums

Nest, tri-lox, playground, design, children's museum

Images courtesy of Tri-Lox

A new interactive playscape created by design and fabrication practice Tri-Lox brings creative play to the rooftop terrace at Brooklyn Children’s Museum in Crown Heights. Inspired by the unique nests made by the baya weaver bird, Nest is made from reclaimed NYC water tower wood fashioned into an organic form; the woven landscape has a climbable exterior, circular hammock area and permeable interior space, all designed to foster free play and discovery.

Find out what makes this playscape so special

Cool Listings, Green Design, More Top Stories, Quirky Homes

columbia island, new rochelle, cool listings, private islands, self sustaining, off grid

Listing photos by Vizzi Media Solutions

This unique home located in New Rochelle just outside New York City is not only situated on a pair of private islands with over five acres of land, but with a year’s worth of fuel oil, the islands are completely self-sustaining for off-the-grid living right in Westchester County. An inspired renovation by the current owner means custom everything and integration with nature without sacrificing comfort. Asking $13 million, Columbia and Pea Islands–and a 5,625-square-foot home–are definitely not your ordinary property.

Take an island tour

Architecture, Green Design, Policy

Photo via Flickr cc

During a rally at Trump Tower yesterday, Mayor Bill de Blasio put the Trump Organization on blast as he promoted the city’s Green New Deal. Under the new climate change legislation, which requires large buildings in New York City to dramatically cut their greenhouse gas emissions, eight Trump-owned properties, referred to as “dirty, inefficient buildings,” would cause the Organization to owe roughly $2.1 million in fines annually beginning in 2030. The 27,000 metric tons of greenhouse gasses that these buildings pump out each year is equal to 5,800 cars. After being passed by the New York City Council on April 18, the law is slated to go into effect on May 17.

More info

Architecture, Green Design, Policy

hudson yards, nyc, west side

Via Flickr

New York City will prohibit the construction of new “inefficient”all-glass and steel skyscrapers, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Monday. Dubbed by the mayor as the city’s version of the Green New Deal, the $14 billion plan aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 30 percent by 2030 as a way to fight climate change. Under the bill, developers would have to meet strict energy codes before getting a building permit from the city. During a press conference Monday, de Blasio said glass skyscrapers that do not meet strict performance guidelines “have no place in our city or on our Earth anymore.”

Learn more

Green Design, Policy

nyc skyline, new york skyline, manhattan

Via Pexels

New York City is ramping up its fight against climate change with a plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from high-rise buildings by 40 percent over the next decade. The City Council is expected to pass on Thursday an eight-bill legislative package that has been called its own version of the Green New Deal. The most ambitious bill of the lot requires NYC buildings 25,000 square feet or bigger to meet new standards to reduce greenhouse gas outputs by upgrading them with energy-efficient technology.

Get the details

Architecture, Green Design

Jendretzki Architects, Pablo Jendretzki, Rat Island

Eight years ago, then 71-year-old Alex Schibli bought an entire NYC island for $160,000. If you’ve never heard of Rat Island, it’s a 2.5-acre land mass off the coast of City Island in the Bronx, where Schibli and his wife live. Originally, he said he had no plans to alter it, but a few months ago, he received a phone call from architect Pablo Jendretzki. “I read an article on him and the island a few months ago and called him to offer to design a project. We met the next morning,” Jendretzki told 6sqft. Schibli had expressed a desire to build a self-sustaining hotel that takes advantage of the island’s natural surroundings. In response, Jendretzki designed this series of off-grid eco pods that would function as a sort of glamping experience.

Learn more about the proposal

Battery Park City, Financial District, Green Design, Policy, South Street Seaport

Lower Manhattan Resiliency, de Blasio, climate change nyc

Via Mayor Bill de Blasio’s office

Mayor Bill de Blasio unveiled on Thursday a $10 billion plan to extend the coastline of Lower Manhattan as much as 500 feet to protect from future floods. The Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency project is the result of a study that looked at ways to build resilience in low-lying neighborhoods like the Financial District and South Street Seaport. The study found the only feasible measure for these areas would be extending the shoreline about two city blocks into the East River by adding a new piece of land at or above 20 feet from current sea level.

Learn more

Green Design, Staten Island, Urban Design

Staten Island Resiliency Project, Governor Cuomo, Hurricane Sandy

Rendering of original sea wall plan via Governor Cuomo’s office

Mayor Bill de Blasio, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, United States Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, and United States Congressman Max Rose announced today that funding has been secured for the Staten Island Levee project. The news gives the green light for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to build a long-awaited 5.3 mile sea wall that would protect waterfront communities in Staten Island from future storms.

Good news for Staten Island

Green Design, Lower East Side, Policy, Urban Design

Image courtesy of David Shankbone via Flickr
Last July, Rebuild by Design, a collaborative organization formed to address the affects of climate change, released an RFP for a stewardship partner for the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project (ESCR), a reconstruction of the 64-acre, 1.5-mile East River Park. The project, a flood protection system conceived in the wake of Hurricane Sandy and budgeted at $760 million, was the first of three phases in a series of self-sufficient flood zones stretching from West 57th to East 42nd Streets. In October, the Mayor’s Office announced an updated $1.45 billion design that would begin in spring of 2020. 70 percent of the original design was updated, ostensibly to allow flood protection to be in place a year earlier, by summer 2023. But, as the New York Times reports, the new plan, which basically calls for burying the park beneath 8-10 feet of landfill and starting over–has left community groups who participated in the original plan feeling like they’ve been hung out to dry.

Find out more

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.