Daily Link Fix

Daily Link Fix

the shed, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Rockwell Group, hudson yards,

The Shed via Diller Scofidio +Renfro (L); Ikea in Red Hook via Wiki Commons (R)

  • Björk will premiere her “most elaborate stage concert yet’ during the inaugural season of Hudson Yards’ performance venue the Shed. [Gothamist]
  • Ikea is looking to open six mixed-use developments in the next two years, and NYC is on their list. [CO]
  • At $61,000 per Amazon job, New York pays twice what Virginia does. [Business Insider]
  • Get a look inside the Miami Beach apartment where late starchitect Zaha Hadid lived. [Dezeen]
  • A Crown Heights street corner was named after Dr. Susan Maria Smith McKinney-Steward, the country’s first female African-American doctor. [Brooklyn Eagle]
  • Apparently, 65 percent of Americans would like an alternative to turkey this Thanksgiving. [NY Post]

Daily Link Fix

Rendering of 99 Hudson Street via China Overseas America, Inc. (L); Photo via Queens International Night Market on Facebook

  • Public observation decks at New York City skyscrapers are having a moment. [WSJ]
  • Roughly 33,000 new apartments will be delivered in Manhattan by 2021. [Crain’s]
  • MTA hires two dozen station managers to keep platforms clean and enhance straphanger customer service. [MTA]
  • The Queens International Night Market returns for its fall season this Saturday. [TimeOut]
  • A new pop-art museum in the Greenwich Village highlights the “ineffectiveness of broken windows policing” with performances and installations. [CityLab]
  • More than 320,000 high school students in NYC will receive S’well reusable bottles with the goal of displacing more than 54 million single-use plastic bottles. [Mayor Bill de Blasio’s office]
  • 99 Hudson Street surpasses 30 Hudson Street as the tallest tower in New Jersey. [YIMBY]

Daily Link Fix

Isa Genzken’s “Rose III.” Photo by Timothy Schenck, courtesy Galerie Buchholz (L); The XI via Bjarke Ingels Group (R)

  • Acclaimed German artist Isa Genzken created a 26-foot-tall rose sculpture for Zuccotti Park. [6sqft inbox]
  • Brooklyn Bridge Park’s long-plagued Squibb Bridge won’t be reopening any time soon. [BK Paper]
  • Bjarke Ingels’ twisting condo The XI launched sales, ranging from a $2.85 million one-bedroom to a $28 million penthouse. [CityRealty]
  • Sales also launched at 111 West 57th Street, SHoP’s super-skinny Billionaires’ Row tower. [Curbed]
  • After 123 years on Fifth Avenue, Henri Bendel will close in January. [Business Insider]
  • Roosevelt Island has three local news outlets… but no working water fountains. [CJR]
  • Five NYC parks that are larger than Central Park. [Untapped Cities]

Daily Link Fix

Via 6sqft (L); Via WNYC/Flickr (R)

  • The New York Blood Center is holding nearly 100 blood drives across the NYC metro region to honor those who lost their lives on 9/11. [Metro NY]
  • First came the two Targets, now a Marshalls is opening next to Katz’s. Is the Lower East Side “already gone” to gentrification? [NYDN]
  • A guide for NYC residents to voting in Thursday’s primaries. [NYC Votes]
  • 6sqft photographers James and Karla Murray have an Instagram of vintage storefronts that is pure NYC nostalgia. [Vogue]
  • Speaking of storefronts… here’s a panoramic view of the staggering numbers of vacant storefronts along the city’s once-popular retail corridors. [NYT]
  • London has tested out several ways to cool its Tube stations. Can the MTA follow suit? [Vice]

Daily Link Fix

Bedford Union Armory Redevelopment rendering by JM Zoning; A conceptual rendering of the pool via Brooklyn Bridge Park (R)

  • Governor Cuomo announced that his office will fund the $15 million Carey Gabay Community Center at Crown Heights’ Bedford-Union Armory development. [Curbed]
  • In 2011, the city introduced green cabs as a way to service areas where yellow cabs typically wouldn’t travel. That same year, Uber began operating in NYC. [NYT]
  • The Hunters Point South ferry landing has been out of service for almost all of August, and it’s probably not reopening any time soon. [LIC Post]
  • In the most bizarre marketing campaign ever, Adidas released a new sneaker inspired by NYC bodegas because they’re “vibrantly colored.” [Sneaker News]
  • Sixty-three years after it was launched as an alternative weekly newspaper, the Village Voice has ceased all operations. [Gothamist]
  • The MTA added permanent “Respect” tributes to Aretha Franklin at the Franklin Avenue subway station. [Untapped Cities]
  • On September 12th and 16th, Brooklyn Bridge Park will hold community meetings about their plan to build a pool at Squibb Park. [BK Bridge Park]

 

Daily Link Fix

A photo of the Malbone Street Wreck on Nov. 1, 1918, courtesy of the New York Transit Museum (L); Via NYC Ferry (R)

  • On Nov. 1, 1918, 100 lives were lost when a Brooklyn Rapid Transit employee lost control of a train at the Prospect Park station. The event was so horrific that the name of the street was changed so New Yorkers would not be reminded of it. [NYP]
  • Eight unique ways to celebrate Labor Day weekend in NYC. [Untapped Cities]
  • The connection is unclear, but SpikedSeltzer is giving out 60 bicycles between today and Thursday to residents affected by the L train shutdown. [Bushwick Daily]
  • The city released a framework for the Gowanus rezoning in June, but local developers are concerned it doesn’t allow for great enough density to offset construction costs. [Crain’s]
  • The NYC Ferry’s Lower East Side route, the sixth and final route, launches today. It connects Long Island City, the LES, and Lower Manhattan in 32 minutes. [Office of the Mayor]
  • A new study shows that conditions at NYCHA units have remained in a deteriorated state over the past four years, while private apartments have improved. [NYDN]
  • Foundation work has begun for Thomas Heatherwick’s High Line-straddling “bubble” condo towers. [CityRealty]

 

Daily Link Fix

ominous nyc skyline

Via Pexels (L) ; Flower District via Flickr/cc (R)

  • The city will preserve 669 Section 8 apartments for 40 years. They’re located in “high-cost neighborhoods”–Williamsburg, Harlem, the East Village–“where the majority of similar buildings have converted to market-rate.” [NYC HPD]
  • Twenty percent of dwelling units currently under construction in New York City are in a hotel. [TRD]
  • Once a $120 million engine, NYC’s Flower District is being killed off by competition, construction and ICE. [Bloomberg]
  • The Museum of Ice Cream, the Museum of Pizza, the Color Factory–how do the city’s new influx of pop-up museums find real estate? [Commercial Observer]
  • Essex Crossing’s Target is now open! [The Lo-Down]
  • And so is the new Four Seasons restaurant after a two-year hiatus and a $30 million buildout. [Gothamist]

Daily Link Fix

NJ Transit via Wiki Commons (L); Watchtower sign via Wiki Commons (R)

  • NJ Transit admitted to extremely poor service this summer–but warned that it probably won’t end until the fall. [NYT]
  • Go inside the world Of NYC “canners,” who survive by collecting recyclable cans and bottles. [Gothamist]
  • And meet the Brooklyn can collector who’s worth $8 million. [NYP]
  • The iconic Watchtower sign that stood atop the Jehovah’s Witnesses’ former Brooklyn Heights HQ was illegal for its entire half-century existence says the DOB. [Brooklyn Daily Eagle]
  • Mayor ee Blasio shifted his plan for a 50-story apartment tower on a Hell’s Kitchen NYCHA parking lot from 100% affordable to 75% luxury. [NYDN]
  • The Yankees are the only major league team never to have held a pride night at a game, so to mark next year’s 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, they’re planning a special event. [NYT]
    How Brooklyn changed the neighborhood restaurant across the country. [Bloomberg]

Daily Link Fix

666 Fifth Avenue, Kushner Companies, Vornado

Google Street View of 666 Fifth Avenue (L); Coney Island’s Ocean Dreams development via Hill West Architects (R)

  • With a wave of bland real estate development, will Coney Island become just like much of the rest of the city–gentrified, but with rides? [The Bridge]
  • For two centuries, New Yorkers have loved giant oysters. [Atlas Obscura]
  • Kushner Companies finally unloaded the troubled 666 Fifth Avenue to Brookfield, whose 99-year lease will likely give the family enough to pay off its $1.1+ billion debt on the building. [WSJ]
  • How Google Maps renames neighborhoods. [NYT]
  • Trump International Hotel at Columbus Circle had a surprise revenue jump this spring thanks to a visit by the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia. [Washington Post]
  • Construction is underway at the Brooklyn Navy Yard’s Admiral’s Row site, which means Wegmans is one step closer to reality. [Brownstoner]
  • All the restaurants in NYC ditching plastic straws. [Grub Street]

Daily Link Fix

Via NYC Ferry (L); key lime pie via Flickr/cc (R)

  • The NYC Ferry’s Soundview and Lower East Side routes will launch on August 15th and 29th. [NYC Ferry]
  • What it’s like to live in an SRO, NYC’s original “micro-housing.” [NYP]
  • There is a fierce debate going on after a cookbook author claimed key lime pie was invented by the Borden condensed milk company at their Madison Avenue test kitchen in 1931. [Gothamist]
  • Some of the city’s most contaminated water tanks are at NYCHA buildings, so why was this erased from inspection reports? [City & State]
  • The 24th annual “Greenest Block in Brooklyn” award goes to the stretch of Lefferts Avenue from Bedford to Rogers Avenues in Prospect Lefferts Gardens. [amNY]
  • Vote for Central Park’s cutest dogs to make it into their 2019 calendar. [Central Park Conservancy]
  • There’s an Instagram account documenting the apartments of rent-stabilized tenants living in the East Village. [EV Greive]

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