Urban Design

Policy, Urban Design

This rendering shows a 20-foot-tall proposed floodwall along the Hudson River at Huron Street in the West Village. Image: Army Corps of Engineers.

Late last year, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released the $52 billion proposal that will represent the most comprehensive effort to date to protect the city from storm surges and the only existing plan for protecting the entire New York Harbor area. The Army Corps recently revealed a new series of renderings that provide a visual glance at how some of these projects might transform the New York City waterfront. Renderings show barriers, gates, sea walls, and raised promenades at Flushing Bay in Queens, at Greenpoint Public Park, and Coney Island in Brooklyn, among others, as THE CITY first reported.

More renderings, this way

History, South Street Seaport, Urban Design

The Brooklyn Banks in 2009. Photo credit: Rasmus Zwickson via Flickr

Tony Hawk’s The Skatepark Project announced plans Thursday to bring the much-loved Brooklyn Banks skate park back to life in a partnership with the nonprofit Brooklyn Bridge Manhattan/Create Gotham Park project. The organizations have joined an ongoing initiative to develop Gotham Park and return the iconic skateboarding mecca to the community by creating a new public park under the Manhattan side of the Brooklyn Bridge. During his State of the City speech on Thursday, Mayor Eric Adams voiced his support for the new public space.

Find out more about bringing back the Banks

Featured Story

Architecture, Design, Features, Policy, Urban Design

Photo credit: Chris Ford via Flickr

A decade ago, an Atlantic hurricane-turned-superstorm named Sandy caught ready-for-anything New York City completely off guard as it raged up the East Coast from the Caribbean to Canada. On October 29, 2012, the city was blindsided by an unanticipated storm surge that flooded streets and subway tunnels and cut power. It took some areas weeks to get the lights back on and, in the best of cases, open for business, and years to rebuild (an effort which is still ongoing). It goes without saying that the city would like this disaster to be the first and last of its kind, but predictions of future environmental impacts are front-page news daily. To that end, experts and innovators in architecture and engineering, government organizations, regulators, and planners have dedicated their efforts–and billions of dollars–to protect the city in a post-Sandy world. But what has really been accomplished–and is the city safer?

Storm clouds, silver linings, but few solutions

Featured Story

City Living, Features, History, Urban Design

The history behind NYC’s water towers

By Devin Gannon, Wed, August 17, 2022

Photo of water towers on East 57th Street via Wikimedia

For over 100 years, water towers have been a seamless part of New York City’s skyline. So seamless, in fact, they often go unnoticed, usually overshadowed by their glassy supertall neighbors. While these wooden relics look like a thing of the past, the same water pumping structure is still built today, originating from just three family-run companies, two of which have been operating for nearly this entire century-long history. With up to 17,000 water tanks scattered throughout NYC, 6sqft decided to explore these icons, from their history and construction to modern projects that are bringing the structures into the mainstream.

Everything you need to know

Green Design, Midtown, Policy, Urban Design

NYC finally launches containerized trash bin pilot

By Aaron Ginsburg, Thu, April 21, 2022

Image courtesy of Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office on Flickr

Mayor Eric Adams and Department of Sanitation Commissioner Jessica Tisch on Wednesday unveiled a new containerized waste bin that the city will eventually deploy across all five boroughs in hopes of thwarting rats, making more room on the sidewalks, and improving the overall quality of life for residents. The new bins are part of the city’s Clean Curbs Pilot program, which was announced two years ago. The first bins were installed in Times Square on Wednesday.

Find out more

Events, Green Design, History, Urban Design

All images courtesy of Daniel Avila / NYC Parks

Throughout April, the city’s parks will celebrate the 200th birthday of Frederick Law Olmsted, the landscape architect whose visionary work on Central Park, Prospect Park, and many other public parks helped influence the future of urban green space design. The Parks Department will be teaching New Yorkers about Olmsted’s influence on urban design with an exhibition at the Arsenal Gallery, tours led by the Urban Park Rangers, and much more.

See more here

Green Design, Policy, Urban Design

All images courtesy of Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office on Flickr

Mayor Eric Adams on Sunday announced over 100 park projects halted due to the pandemic will resume work this spring. The city has invested $417 million in NYC Parks to break ground on the 104 projects, which is a 142 percent increase in new park projects compared to 2021. According to a press release, more than 86 percent of the new projects implement sustainable features like LED lighting, rain gardens, new trees, stormwater capture systems, and the use of recycled materials. Roughly 62 percent of these new projects are being installed in neighborhoods classified as underserved and are expected to be completed by the summer of 2023.

Find out more

Policy, Transportation, Urban Design

Image courtesy of NYC DOT on Flickr

The New York City Department of Transportation is implementing new strategies to keep cyclists safe while navigating the hectic city streets. Commissioner Ydanis Rodriguez on Friday announced the start of a new project that will fortify half of all delineator-protected bike lanes in NYC, which better protects cyclists and keeps lanes clear of vehicles. Originally set to be completed within the first 100 days of Rodriguez’s term, as Streetsblog reported, the city now aims to harden 20 of the city’s 40 miles of delineator-protected bike lines by the end of 2023.

Find out more

Green Design, Urban Design

Photo of Riverside Park by Momos on Wikimedia

All five of New York City’s borough presidents are calling on Mayor Eric Adams to improve the city’s green spaces by planting one million new trees by 2030. During a joint press conference on Monday, Borough Presidents Mark Levine, Antonio Reynoso, Vanessa Gibson, Donovan Richards, and Vito Fossella introduced the “Million More Trees” initiative, a program first started by former Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and completed by Mayor Bill de Blasio in 2015. Also included as part of the initiative is the goal of increasing the city’s tree canopy to 30 percent by 2035.

See more here

Midtown East, Urban Design

New plans announced for Park Avenue traffic median redesign

By Michelle Cohen, Wed, January 19, 2022

Photo by midweekpost via Wikimedia commons.

New York City Council Member Keith Powers announced this week the next steps in a plan to bring new life to Midtown’s Park Avenue traffic medians. The newly-revealed plan will transform the avenue’s current malls into “new, world-class, active open space,” according to a press release. A landscape architect will be hired by the Department of Transportation to create a master plan according to a request for proposal, to be issued in the spring.
New life for Midtown streets, this way

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