Starchitecture

Architecture, Starchitecture

Steven Holl Architects, Pratt Institute Higgins Hall Insertion, Pratt Institute architecture

Last night in Santiago, Chile, 36 “Outstanding Projects” in international architecture and design were announced by the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) and the Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize (MCHAP). The honorees were chosen by a panel of 70 ambassadors from a longer list of 226. The 36 inaugural finalists are considered the best works in the Americas from 2000-2013, and four of these projects are right here in New York City.

Find out what our hometown architecture winners are

Featured Story

Features, History, Landscape Architecture, Roosevelt Island, Starchitecture

FDR Four Freedoms Park, roosevelt island, park roosevelt island, louis kahn

The Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedom’s Park may have opened relatively recently in 2012, but architect Louis Kahn was brewing up the design for the memorial park nearly 40 years earlier. Kahn’s death in 1974 (a somewhat tragic one which left him dead and alone in a Penn Station bathroom after a heart attack) was unfortunately accented by a dwindling reputation — Kahn’s sordid multi-family affairs had come to light upon his passing and his fading architecture practice was loaded with debt. But beyond all the scandal, Kahn also left behind a number of sketchbooks packed with complete sets of unrealized projects. One of these projects was the Four Freedom’s Park.

While plenty of accolades have been given to successful realization of the project so far after Kahn’s death, few have tracked where the architect may have pulled his inspiration for the design. That is until now. As a number of Kahn’s sketches emerge for public viewing, some are asking: Was the the design of Louis Kahn’s Four Freedom’s Park inspired by the Eye of Providence found on the U.S. dollar bill?

What people are saying

Cool Listings, Interiors, Starchitecture, West Village 

165 Charles Street PH interior, Richard Meier designed, Louise Blouin home

The penthouse of Pritzker Prize-winning starchitect Richard Meier’s last residential masterpiece is on the market for the first time since it was built in 2005. You know what that means. It means we get to glimpse inside the stunning West Village pad so we can begin brainstorming fundraising ideas to get this hot $35 million trophy. As if it’s not impressive enough that this 165 Charles Street penthouse sits atop an iconic building that won the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects 2005 Housing Design Award, this condo was designed by the starchitect himself. Now, if that’s not something to brag about, we don’t know what is.

Take a look inside the masterfully designed penthouse here

Getting Away, Hamptons, Starchitecture

The original Furniture House was built in Yamanashi, Japan in 1995, but the design has evolved since then.

Shigeru Ban‘s star has risen, and his 2014 Pritzker Prize is attracting attention to all his designs, like the recently opened Cast Iron House. But did you know that one of his lesser known works lies just outside of New York City? If you’re looking for a reason to get out of town, and would like to see one of Ban’s homes up close, then all you have to do is take a drive to the Hamptons.

See our gallery of the building here

Events, Starchitecture, Urban Design

rafael vinoly, nyc skyline, rafael vinoly nyc

There are skyscrapers going up left and right all over Manhattan, and in the race to build the loftiest and the glassiest, big name developers are seeking out even bigger name architects to brand their supertalls with iconic designs. As part of their ongoing Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile seriesthe Museum of the City of New York will be hosting what’s sure to be a riveting panel in which several of the world’s leading architects and engineers will be discussing how they approach the design and construction challenges that come with building 100 stories and up.

Details on how to attend here

Featured Story

Features, People, Starchitecture

Morris Adjmi

Have you ever seen an interesting building and wondered if it was old, new, or somewhere in between?  If so, there’s a good chance you were looking at one of Morris Adjmi‘s creations. This is the brilliance of the architect–his buildings focus on the fundamentals of design, blending in with their historic surroundings, but still showcasing subtle, modern touches that make them unique.

While Adjmi’s contemporaries seem to be in a race to build the tallest, glassiest building in town, he has become the go-to architect for downtown developers thanks to his utilitarian- and industrial-influenced designs.  After opening his own firm MA in 1997, Adjmi gained permanent notoriety with the Scholastic Building in SoHo, a 2001 project he collaborated on with Pritzker Prize winner Aldo Rossi. It was the first example of new construction in the SoHo Cast-Iron Historic District, and architecture Paul Goldberger said it was “a building that will teach generations of architects the proper way to respond to historic contexts.”

More on Adjmi’s work right ahead

Queens, Starchitecture

philip johnson tent of tomorrow, philip johnson, tent of tomorrow, new york world's fair

Philip Johnson lovers rejoice! It was just announced that the city will put aside $5.8 million to restore the dilapidated crown jewel of the 1964-65 World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows Corona Park. Funding for the restoration of the “Tent of Tomorrow” came via Mayor Bill de Blasio, who contributed $4.2 million to the project, while the rest was provided by the City Council and Borough President Melinda Katz. Katz has been a champion for restoring the iconic structure, even forming a task force of civic leaders to save the work. Efforts to restore the project will begin soon, but a bumpy road lies ahead…

More on the restoration efforts here

Starchitecture, Transportation, Upstate

Filling up the ole’ gas tank is not a glamorous job, and usually not a task that leaves one marveling at the surrounding architecture.  But in 1927, Prairie-style extraordinaire Frank Lloyd Wright put together plans for a fuel filling station in Buffalo, New York that would leave even the most seasoned driver awe struck.

Now, almost 90 years later, the Buffalo Transportation Pierce-Arrow Museum has realized Wright’s vision and constructed the station as a one-of-a-kind installation housed in a 40,000-square-foot glass and steel atrium, made possible by a $6.3 million state grant. The arts-and-crafts gas station, the third Wright recreation in Buffalo, makes a nod to Native American design and thoughtfully mixes practicality with visual appeal.

Take a virtual tour of the architectural masterpiece

Architecture, New Developments, Nolita, Starchitecture

152 Elizabeth Street, Tadao Ando, Gabellini Sheppard, NYC starchitecture

It was announced back in March that Pritzker Prize winning architect Tadao Ando would be bringing his signature style to Nolita, and we’ve been waiting with bated breath to see what beauty he would design for the city. Wait no more… It looks like a few renderings of the 7-story, 8-unit residence planned for 152 Elizabeth Street have finally been unveiled!

See more images of 152 this way

Midtown East, New Developments, Starchitecture

Sony Building

The Philip Johnson-designed Sony Tower at 550 Madison Avenue, one of the most notable postmodern office towers in New York City, is set to be partially converted to high-end condos, as states planes filed by developer Chetrit Group.  It’s not known which of the building’s 37 floors the residential units will occupy, but Chetrit, led by Joseph Chetrit, has said in the past that it will convert the upper floors and either keep the lower floors as offices or turn them into a luxury hotel.

Construction likely won’t begin for at least one to two years since Sony still leases office space.  When the developer purchased the building from Sony in 2013 for $1.1 billion at auction, Sony committed to remaining in the offices for around three years until moving to a new space near Madison Square.  Chetrit outbid 21 rivals and paid $685 million more for the building than Sony did in 2002.

Find out more about the development here

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