Starchitecture

condos, Major Developments, New Developments, Starchitecture, Tribeca

45 Park Place, Tribeca Condo, Manhattan Luxury, NYC developments, Supertall skyscrapers, WTC mosque

New images have been uncovered of an upcoming 39-story condominium tower poised to rise from a storied site in Tribeca. Curbed first broke the rendering reveal back in July and a representative of the developers noted that tower depicted in renderings are not quite final. Nevertheless new images posted on of SOMA Architects’ website give us additional glimpses of what the project could be.

Simply known as 45 Park Place (for now), the development is comprised of a 665-foot tower luxury tower and an Islamic museum, is being developed by a consortium led by Soho Properties, headed by Sharif El-Gamal. The tower is being crafted by Michel Abboud of SOMA Architects, with Ismael Leyva serving as the architect of record. Renderings posted on SOMA’s website convey a light, airy tower composed of stem-like volumes bundled by delicate bands of lattice-like mullions. The ground-level view gives us our first glimpse of the adjacent Islamic museum and prayer space reportedly designed by Pritzker Prize–winning French architect Jean Nouvel. A small plaza fronting the museum will expose a vegetated side wall of the neighboring building that houses popular downtown grocer Amish Market.

More on the development here

Architecture, Harlem, New Developments, Starchitecture

hap five, karim rashid, 329 pleasant avenue, hap investments

After much outcry, the Karim Rashid-designed residential building at 329 Pleasant Avenue in Harlem will be getting a new color scheme. According to the WSJ, locals have voted to scrap HAP Five‘s color-blocked magenta and turquoise design for a facade of simple white balconies with a less audacious “translucent cirrus with [a] graduated magenta balcony trim”.

Find out more here

Architecture, Downtown Brooklyn, Major Developments, Manhattan, Starchitecture

New York supertalls, nyc towers, manhattan real estate, midtown condo, new york skyline

It seems like every week a new residential skyscraper is being announced in New York City, just earlier this week the New York Times noted that a partnership between Steven Witkoff and Harry Macklowe is moving ahead with a redevelopment of the Park Lane Hotel at 36 Central Park West with an 850-foot tower.

With the mind-boggling amount of residential spires poised to pierce the sky, here’s a quick rundown of the tallest of the tall–the spindly bunch set to soar higher than 700 feet. Keep in mind that just 30 years ago, the tallest residence in the city was perched atop the 664-foot Trump Tower. Today, buildings are on the drawing board for more than twice that height.

See our list of the 26 tallest towers

Midtown, New Developments, Starchitecture

Just last week, we announced that the Jean Nouvel-designed MoMA residential tower was finally moving forward, after the purchase of $85 million in air rights and with a new construction loan of $860 million. Now, The Real Deal has obtained penthouse floorplans for the 82-story tower, and they are nothing to sneeze at.

Check out the floorplans and dream about living in a Nouvel-approved penthouse

Featured Story

Chelsea, Features, Hell's Kitchen, Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Starchitecture

edward norton, high line park, the high line at the railyards, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Piet Oudolf , James Corner, James Corner Field Operations, hudson yards, high line section 3

The third and final section of the High Line will officially open to the public today at 11 A.M., marking the final chapter of a 15-year journey to transform a once abandoned rail road track into an elevated park for the city. The new section has been christened ‘High Line at the Railyards‘ and follows the original train tracks from 30th to 34th Streets to the north and south, and from 10th to 12th Avenues east and west, exposing High Line-goers to expansive and unobstructed views of the Hudson River and New Jersey. Unlike the two sections that preceded it, the path that makes up The Railyards is far less manicured. With its organized but “wild” greenery, the design of this final leg instead asks visitors to contemplate the railway’s past and the surrounding landscape as it stands and as it will change with the introduction of Hudson Yards.

More of the new section and the ribbon cutting here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, real estate trends, Starchitecture

Glass vs. Stone: An Epic Architecture Battle

By Dana Schulz, Thu, September 18, 2014

glas and stone nyc buildings, stone nyc buildings, glas nyc buildings

Decisions, decisions…sometimes there’s just far too many in New York City. Thai or Chinese takeout? Subway or bus? Central Park or the High Line? The list goes on. And one of the most grueling decisions we make as New Yorkers is where to live. From choosing a borough and neighborhood to deciding on a price point, it’s quite the undertaking. But what about the most elementary component of the building in which we decide to live–it’s material. To be more exact, glass or stone.

Glass tower dwellers are often drawn to the floor-to-ceiling windows, panoramic views, and clean lines, whereas buyers of apartments in stone buildings prefer a more traditional feel, with pre-war-style layouts that provide great separation of spaces. And some of the city’s most prominent architects have become synonymous with one style or the other. Think Richard Meier for glass and Robert A.M. Stern for stone. CityRealty decided to take a closer look at this epic battle and see how pairs of glass and stone developments fared across the city.

See how these buildings battle it out

condos, Midtown, New Developments, Starchitecture

jean nouvel, 53W53, 53 West 53rd Street

Hot off the purchase of $85 million in air rights, and with a new construction loan of $860 million in tow, Hines is back on track to bring the Jean Nouvel-designed MoMA residential tower to fruition. According to TRD, Hines just closed on two deals to buy more than 240,000 square feet of development rights from MoMA and the St. Thomas Episcopal Church for $85.3 million.

more here

Featured Story

Features, History, Starchitecture

A La Sagrada Familia in Manhattan? See the Unbuilt NYC Gaudí

By Jason Carpenter, Thu, September 18, 2014

antoni gaudi nyc, the unbuilt gaudi, unbuilt gaudi in nyc,lost gaudi design,, Hotel Attraction gaudi, Hotel Attraction gaudi nyc, Hotel Attraction new york, hotel atraccion gaudi

Gaudi’s proposed building in the New York skyline, as imagined by the TV show “Fringe.” Image © FringeTelevision.com

Atoni Gaudí was a brilliant and polarizing architect. Whereas most architects will see their works compared and contrasted against others in their field, even the most knowledgeable architectural critics will look at Gaudí’s work and throw up their hands and say it must be something alien. The organic curves and mounds of Gaudí’s designs look hundreds of years ahead of their time. But Gaudí worked mostly around his home region of Catalonia, and the businesslike skyscrapers of Manhattan have never looked anything like the the architect’s designs. However, there was a time when a Gaudí NYC skyscraper almost came to be.

See the proposed Gaudí building here

Architecture, Starchitecture, Technology

frank gehry

It was big news last week that Frank Gehry’s designed plans for the Performing Arts Center at the World Trade Center were axed by execs of the site. Though he may have felt slightly snubbed, based on quotes he provided to the New York Times, Gehry seemed unaffected overall. His mellow reaction toward the dis is now further substantiated by news that his IT company Gehry Technologies has been acquired by American location technology firm Trimble (the owner of 3D drawing software SketchUp) in order to “transform the construction industry by further connecting the office to on-site construction technologies,” according to Trimble.

More on the starchitect’s new partnership here

Architecture, Financial District, Starchitecture

world trade center, Performing Arts Center at the World Trade Center , frank gehry

Frank Gehry continues to fall out of favor with New Yorkers as execs of the Performing Arts Center at the World Trade Center have officially shelved the starchitect’s design planned for Ground Zero. Gehry drew up plans for the art center over a decade ago and very few moves were made to bring the project to fruition—in part due to stalled fund-raising and delays to the construction of the transit hub which sits under site. The snub, which actually wasn’t communicated to the architect directly, seems to not have affected him much, but he had some choice words directed towards the board’s president, Maggie Boepple.

More on the drama here

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