Architecture

Architecture, condos, Gramercy Park, New Developments

OMA, 121 East 22nd Street, Gramercy, architecture, toll brothers

Photo by Laurian Ghinitoiu.

The new L-shaped residential building at 121 East 22nd Street represents Rem Koolhaas‘s architecture firm OMA‘s first ground-up Manhattan project; developers Toll Brothers City Living have released new photos of the eye-catching structure on the border between the Gramercy and Madison Square Park neighborhoods, highlighting its unique design. The new condominium residence is comprised of two blocks that straddle an existing tower, the 11-story School of the Future, constructed in 1915. The building’s north tower has two interlocking planes that meet to form a distinct, three-dimensional corner. The 13-story south tower features an “undulating grid of punched windows” overlooking 22nd Street.

More views this way

Architecture, Crown Heights

ODA, crown heights, architecture, school

Rendering by Darc Studio.
In designing a Crown Heights girls’ school seeking an addition to their current campus, design and architecture firm ODA New York challenged the traditional American school building model, taking the future of urban density into account. The resulting design introduces a sixth facade, giving the structure a new set of faces to apply materials and create openings.

More views of the cool new-school design

Hudson Square, Landscape Architecture, Transportation, Urban Design

Conceptual rendering by AKRF and W Architecture and Landscape Architecture

The city announced on Thursday that plans to make Hudson Street between Canal and West Houston Streets in Hudson Square into a grand boulevard with wider sidewalks, parking-protected bike lanes and small outdoor “living rooms” with seating surrounded by greenery are moving forward with design and construction teams on board. Prima Paving Corporation, Sam Schwartz Engineering, and Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects have been chosen as design-build consultants for the project according to the city’s Economic Development Corporation and Department of Transportation, as well as the Hudson Square BID. The design-build concept means that contracting both the design and construction components to the firms, which will act as a team, can streamline the process.

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Architecture, Construction Update, Rentals, Williamsburg

one south first, domino sugar factory, williamsburg

Photo by Max Touhey

Williamsburg officially has a new tallest tower. One South First, formerly 260 Kent Avenue, topped out this week at the Domino Sugar Factory redevelopment along the waterfront. Designed by COOKFOX Architects, the 435-foot-tall tower features two interlocking buildings with white precast concrete facades inspired by the molecular pattern and forms of sugar crystals, a reference to the former factory site.

Domino details here

Architecture, condos, Cool Listings, New Developments, Nomad

In March, Rockefeller Group, the famous developers behind their eponymous Rockefeller Center, announced that they’d be building their first residential project in their 90-year history. Dubbed Rose Hill for the historic area that once occupied today’s Nomad, the 600-foot tower at 30 East 29th Street is a uniquely modern interpretation of the Art Deco style. Now we have an even better look at this striking bronze facade, as well as the expansive amenity spaces and luxury condo interiors. The new views coincide with sales launching; prices will start at $1.195 million for a studio.

More details and renderings this way

adaptive reuse, Architecture, New Jersey

audible, newark, innovation cathedral

Audible, the audiobook company owned by Amazon, opened new offices on Friday in a restored historic cathedral in Newark. The company, which has been located in New Jersey’s largest city since 2007, restored an 80,000-square-foot 1913 church and modernized it with open workspace, a four-lane bowling alley, and cafes. Dubbed the Innovation Cathedral, the new offices on Washington Street will hold 400 employees.

See the space

Featured Story

Features, Starchitecture

Following Thursday’s news of the death of 102-year-old Pritzker Prize-winning Chinese-American architect I.M. Pei, the spotlight has been focused on his many contributions throughout the world. His firm, Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, has had a hand in dozens of projects throughout New York City, though Pei himself was the principal designer for only a rare few. Below is a roundup of I.M. Pei’s NYC buildings, from a pedestrian plaza “superblock” in residential Brooklyn to the iconic Four Seasons Hotel, to the JFK Aiport Sundrome that was sadly demolished in 2011, and a never-realized futuristic 1956 Hyperboloid design that was to be a replacement for Grand Central Terminal

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Architecture, Midtown West, Transportation

Penn Station, LIRR, Governor Cuomo

On Thursday Governor Andrew M. Cuomo unveiled the final design for the new main entrance to Penn Station. The new 33rd Street and 7th Avenue entrance will provide much-needed direct access to the Long Island Rail Road main concourse and the subway, eliminate congestion by doubling capacity for riders entering and leaving the LIRR level and enhance safety and security. Construction begins next month and will wrap up in December of 2020. The new design is the first we’ve seen of the $600 million Penn Station revamp since last September when Gov. Cuomo revealed a new LIRR entrance and public plaza.

More of the new designs this way

Construction Update, Financial District, New Developments, Starchitecture

130 William, David Adjaye

Photo by Chris Coe for Optimist Consulting

Construction at 130 William Street, starchitect David Adjaye’s first skyscraper in New York City, topped out at 800 feet this week. The 66-story tower is making its mark on the Financial District with its hand-cast façade featuring large-scale arched windows and bronze detailing. When complete, it will house 242 residences ranging from $1,300,000 for a one-bedroom to $20,000,000 for a four-bedroom, full-floor penthouse. According to developer Lightstone, there was enormous interest in the units as soon as sales launched less than a year ago, and the tower has since become one of the city’s best-selling condos.

More info and views

affordable housing, Architecture

Big ideas for small lots, architecture, AIA, HPD, affordable housing

“More with Less,” a winning entry by Palette Architecture

The New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) and the American Institute of Architects New York (AIANY) announced on Tuesday the selection of five New York City-based firms as finalists in the Big Ideas for Small Lots NYC design competition for small-scale, urban infill housing. As 6sqft previously reported, the program was organized by HPD and AIANY as a way to address the challenges associated with the design and construction of affordable housing on 23 lots of underutilized city-owned land. First announced by the city last year, the program falls under Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Housing New York 2.0 plan. The winning proposals were selected by a panel of nine jurors and evaluated on their design, replicability, and construction feasibility. The finalists will advance to the final stage of the program.

See more of the finalists’ designs

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