Architecture

Financial District, Green Design, Landscape Architecture

New $18.3M sustainable playground opens at the Battery

By Aaron Ginsburg, Mon, December 20, 2021

Image courtesy of Diane Bondareff/AP Images for The Battery Conservancy

One of New York City’s largest sustainable parks officially opened last week. Following a 25-year initiative, the Battery Conservancy on Thursday opened the Battery Playscape, a 1.5-acre playground that triples the size of the former park and aims to reinforce sustainable practices in its users through its eco-friendly design and features.

Details here

Architecture, Design, Prospect Heights

Prospect Park’s Vale to undergo $40M restoration

By Aaron Ginsburg, Fri, December 17, 2021

Rendering of the Sensory Garden and Rustic Arbor. Image courtesy of Prospect Park Alliance

On Thursday, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced the allocation of $40 million to restore Prospect Park’s Vale. This funding is the largest in the history of Prospect Park Alliance, the non-profit organization that manages the park. The Vale, also known as the “Vale of Cashmere,” is a 26-acre portion of the park’s northeast corner known for its breathtaking foliage.

Find out more

Architecture, Major Developments, Midtown East, Urban Design

Rendering by Ekoomedia, Inc. / Courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

The New York City Council voted on Wednesday to allow the proposed development at the site currently occupied by the Grand Hyatt Hotel at 175 Park Avenue. New Greater East Midtown zoning rules permit developers to construct supersized towers if they are accompanied by hefty contributions to transit and public amenities. In addition to the construction of a 2.1-million-square-foot, 1,575-foot-high building with retail and office space, a new 500-room hotel, a sky lobby, a lounge, and a restaurant, the site will include 25,000 square feet of elevated, publicly accessible terraces that will host cultural and arts events. The project also promises to bring hundreds of millions of dollars in transit improvements.

Find out more

Landscape Architecture, Tribeca

Photo credit: Max Guliani/Hudson River Park

The Tribeca Habitat Enhancement Project announced it has completed what has been the largest habitat enhancement project to date, and the first large-scale restoration initiative in Hudson River Park’s 400-acre Estuarine Sanctuary between Pier 26 and Pier 34. A key indicator of the project’s success: the installation of 11.2 million juvenile oysters to help support marine life in the Hudson River.

Many oysters, this way

Architecture, Design, Downtown Brooklyn, Major Developments, New Developments

Get a first look inside the tallest tower in Brooklyn

By Devin Gannon, Mon, December 13, 2021

All renderings courtesy of Gabriel Saunders unless otherwise noted.

After officially becoming Brooklyn’s tallest building in October, the Brooklyn Tower is now showing off its sumptuous interiors. When the 1,066-foot-tall tower, the first and only supertall in the borough, opens at 9 DeKalb Avenue next year, there will be 550 total residences, with 150 condos for sales and 400 rentals. New images provide a sneak peek of the interiors designed by Gachot Studio, which was able to manipulate the tower’s unique hexagonal shape for sweeping incomparable city views.

Learn more

Architecture, Design, Green Design, Upstate

Photo: James Karpowicz

One of the greenest new residential developments in New York launched sales recently, offering eco-conscious buyers a chance to custom design an energy-efficient dream home in the mountains. Located in Livingston Manor across 90 acres in the Catskill Mountains, The Catskill Project will feature 11 single-family homes designed to meet Passive House standards. Buyers will choose from three unique designs for their home, all of which will include solar energy and the opportunity for eco upgrades. Pricing starts at $895,000 for two-bedroom homes and $945,000 for three-bedrooms.

Find out more

Architecture, Design, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Upper West Side 

All renderings designed by Foster+ Partners, courtesy of the Landmarks Preservation Commission

A plan funded by one of the world’s wealthiest people and designed by one of the world’s most famous architects still can’t get approved in New York City. Billionaire Bill Ackman on Tuesday presented to the Landmarks Preservation Commission his plan to construct a new glass penthouse addition designed by Norman Foster on top of a 100-year-old Upper West Side co-op building where he owns an apartment. After hours-long public testimony, LPC Chair Sarah Carroll sent Ackman and his team back to the drawing board, calling for a scaled-down design.

See it here

Architecture, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Murray Hill

Photo: George Comfort & Sons via Landmarks Preservation Commission

One of Manhattan’s grandest lobbies is officially a New York City landmark. The Landmarks Preservation Commission voted to designate the ornate, T-shaped first-floor lobby of 200 Madison Avenue on Tuesday. Designed by Warren & Wetmore in 1925–the firm behind Grand Central Terminal–the Murray Hill lobby features a 200-foot-long through-block arcade that boasts a beautiful vaulted ceiling, polished marble walls, and other stunning elements reflective of the era.

Get the details

Architecture, condos, Construction Update, Design, Downtown Brooklyn, Major Developments, Rentals

Photo by Selvon Ramsawak

The tallest tower in Brooklyn officially topped out this week. Located at 9 DeKalb Avenue, newly christened The Brooklyn Tower reached its summit of 1,066 feet, the first and only supertall building (300 meters in height or taller) to rise in the borough. Developed by JDS Development Group and designed by SHoP Architects, the mixed-use tower incorporates the landmarked Dime Savings Bank of Brooklyn into both the skyscraper’s design and use; the iconic bank building will hold new retail space and an entry to the residential tower through its colonnade. With occupancy expected next year, the 93-story Brooklyn Tower offers 550 residences, with 150 condos for sale and 400 rentals.

Find out more

Architecture, Bronx, City Living, History, Washington Heights

Photo by Shinya Suzuki on Flickr

Described in 1967 by the Landmarks Preservation Commission as “one of Manhattan’s most picturesque architectural monuments,” the Highbridge Water Tower reopened on Wednesday following a restoration project. Located in Washington Heights, the octagonal tower opened in 1872 and served as part of the Croton Aqueduct system, helping increase water pressure throughout the borough. While it no longer is part of the city’s water system, the 200-foot landmark is the only one of its kind that remains today. The Parks Department also announced free public tours of the inside of the tower led by the department’s Urban Park Rangers will resume next month.

Get the details

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.