Architecture

Architecture, History, Midtown, Midtown East

View looking north, with Central Park and the towers that dot Billionaires’ Row clearly visible; Photo courtesy of Empire State Realty Trust

After four years and $165 million, the revamp of New York City’s first supertall is nearly complete, bringing a more contemporary and visitor-friendly experience to one of the world’s most historic buildings. The Empire State Building’s 102nd-floor observatory, which boasts 360-degree panoramic views at 1,250 feet above street level, officially opens to the public on Saturday, Oct. 12. Building owner Empire State Realty Trust redesigned the observatory to be less obstructive for guests, allowing more picture-perfect views and less time waiting.

All the way up

Landscape Architecture, Lower East Side, Policy, Urban Design

Coastal Resiliency, NYC flooding, DDC

Preliminary design of Corlears shared use path; via DDC.

Borough President Gale A. Brewer and Council Member Carlina Rivera announced Thursday the completed report by independent consulting firm Deltares on the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project (ESCR). As 6sqft previously reported, the project was first developed in the wake of Hurricane Sandy and is intended to protect 2.2 miles of Manhattan’s East Side, between East 25th Street and Montgomery Street, from flooding and improve access to waterfront space. According to the city, the ESCR project would protect over 110,000 New Yorkers in the area.

Find out more and read the report

Architecture, Construction Update, Downtown Brooklyn

Rendering by DBOX

Brooklyn just keeps getting bigger. In April, the borough’s tallest tower, the condo tower Brooklyn Point, topped out at 720 feet. Now, Brooklyn’s tallest office tower has also reached its full 495-foot height. One Willoughby Square (or 1WSQ as it’s now being called) is expected to open at the end of 2020, at which time its architect, FXCollaborative, will also become the anchor tenant. The 34-story building will contain 500,000 square feet of office space; all of the floor plans are column-free and many floors have private outdoor terraces.

More looks and details

Architecture, Long Island City

Photo © Steven Holl Architects

Steven Holl’s Hunters Point Library has garnered glowing architectural reviews since it’s opening last month, but visitors quickly pointed out a critical issue with accessibility in the $41 million building. Although the library has an elevator, it doesn’t stop at the fiction section which is tiered on three levels above the lobby and accessible only via stairs. In light of the criticism, a Queens Public Library official has announced that books in that section will be relocated to an accessible area of the library, as Gothamist reported.

More details

Architecture, New Developments, Williamsburg

25 Kent, williamsburg, office, commercial, new developments, Hollwich Kushner (HWKN), Gensler

Photo credit: Ty Cole

25 Kent Avenue, Williamsburg’s first ground-up commercial office development in over 50 years, is now complete. The building spans a full city block and was designed by architects Hollwich Kushner (HWKN) and Gensler and to provide “a social campus for innovators, startup founders, and tech leaders.” As 6sqft previously reported, the eight-story building holds 500,000 square feet of office space along the Williamsburg waterfront as well as retail at ground level and underground parking, with millennial-friendly rooftops and terraces and floor-to-ceiling windows.

Many more photos of 25 Kent, this way

affordable housing, Architecture, Downtown Brooklyn

Rendering of 22 Chapel Street courtesy of CetraRuddy

After breaking ground last month, the mixed-use development at 22 Chapel Street near the Manhattan Bridge now has more details to share. Designed by CetraRuddy, the 20-story tower will bring 180 rental units to Downtown Brooklyn, 45 of which will be affordable. Among other amenities, it will have a rooftop pool and terrace, along with ground-floor retail space and a new headquarters for the START organization. Completion is expected in 2021.

More details

Featured Story

Architecture, Archtober, Events, Features

Archtober 2019: Top 10 events and program highlights

By Michelle Cohen, Fri, September 27, 2019

Archtober is an annual architecture and design festival consisting of tours, events, films, lectures and exhibitions celebrating New York City’s love affair with the built environment. During the month of October, a full calendar of events puts a focus on the importance–and the future–of architecture and design. Organized by the Center for Architecture, over 80 partner and sponsor organizations across the city add their voices to the festival. Now in its ninth year, Archtober offers something for everyone—from the arch-intellectual with a love for concept to the armchair designer with a thing for waterways, parks or sustainable design—in the 100+ event roster. Below, we pick 10 intriguing highlights from this year’s offerings.

Celebrate architecture and NYC at these cool events

Architecture, Bed Stuy, New Developments, Starchitecture

Renderings courtesy of The Collective and Artefactorylab

Days after filing building permits for 1215 Fulton Street in Bed-Stuy—the site of the former Slave Theatre—London-based co-living startup The Collective has announced it will be partnering with renowned Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto on the design, his first in New York. The 10-story structure will span over 240,000 square feet and be comprised of three buildings connected by an expansive “ground-floor hub” designed to feel like “an extension of the street.” The project aims to create “a new idea of how a community can come together in a building,” as the architects explained in a design statement.

Take a first look at the renderings

Architecture, Design, Long Island City

Photo © Paul Warchol

Despite standing just 82 feet tall, the new Hunters Point Library manages to stand out among its skyscraper neighbors on the Long Island City waterfront. The concrete structure, designed by Steven Holl Architects, officially opened to the public Tuesday, about two decades after officials proposed building a new Queens Public Library branch. The delays, and the whopping $40 million price tag, appear to have been worth it, as the building, with its carved windows and incredible skyline views, continues to garner approval from top architecture critics.

Take the tour

Architecture, Astoria, New Developments, Starchitecture

Renderings courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group and Wildflower Ltd.

The star power involved with Robert de Niro’s planned production studio in Astoria continues to grow. The development group—which includes developer Wildflower Ltd, Raphael De Niro, and Jane Rosenthal—has just revealed a first look at the 650,000-square-foot facility designed by Bjarke Ingels Group. The $400 million project, called Wildflower Studios, will establish a hub for the creation of film, television, and other forms of entertainment, including augmented reality and virtual reality. The facility is expected to create more than 1,000 daily union jobs.

Get a first look at the renderings

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