Architecture

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Midtown

Snøhetta, 550 Madison Avenue, AT&T Building, Olayan Group

Renderings courtesy of Snøhetta and MOARE

The privately-owned public space (POPS) on the ground floor of Philip Johnson and John Burgee’s Postmodern skyscraper at 550 Madison Avenue declined over time due to multiple alterations and was often described as being “tall, skinny, and dark.” As part of Snøhetta’s transformation of the landmark, the garden is receiving a lot of attention. In December, developer Olayan Group revealed plans to increase the public space by 50 percent while creating “a welcoming sensory retreat in the heart of East Midtown.” After being approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission last year, the open space has now received its final approval from the Department of City Planning.

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Architecture, Midtown, New Developments

TSX Broadway, Times Square, L&L Holding

Rendering courtesy of TSX Broadway

A mixed-use development project hopes to bring even more bright lights and theatrics to Times Square. A team of developers, led by L&L Holding Company, will provide the ultimate New Year’s Eve experience at its new luxury hotel, part of the plan to transform the historic Palace Theatre into TSX Broadway. New renderings of the $2.5 billion project, which involves raising the theater more than 30 feet and building a 669-room hotel above it, show off suites with perfect views of the Times Square ball drop, the neighborhood’s first outdoor stage, and immersive retail experiences.

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Featured Story

Architecture, Design, Features

As the decade draws to a close, we’re reflecting on the growth and evolution of New York City during the 2010s. In the past 10 years, the city has seen the rebirth of neighborhoods, the creation of a totally new one, the return of a major sports team to Brooklyn, and the biggest subway expansion in decades. We’ve asked notable New Yorkers to share which project of the past decade they believe has made the most significant impact on the city, from the redevelopment of the World Trade Center site to the revival of the Coney Island boardwalk.

The full list ahead

Featured Story

Architecture, building of the year, Features, New Developments, Nomad

Announcing 6sqft’s 2019 Building of the Year!

By 6sqft, Fri, December 13, 2019

Rendering via DBOX; frame via Pixabay

The votes have been tallied, and it’s time to name the 2019 Building of the Year! The winning title belongs to none other than Nomad’s Madison House at 15 East 30th Street. The 62-story tower beat out 11 other significant NYC buildings, taking first place with 1,284 votes, 34% of the 3,823 total votes cast. Not only is the building the tallest in Nomad at 805 feet, but its sleek design from Handel Architects was done in a unique decagon shape that allows all of the 199 apartments to have column-free corners. Plus, Nomad is an ever-burgeoning neighborhood full of hip restaurants, plenty of transit options, and one of the city’s greatest concentrations of fitness studios.

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Featured Story

Architecture, Features, NYC Guides, Starchitecture

The Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, One World Trade Center: all buildings that instantly come to mind when you think of the iconic New York City skyline. But more and more new skyscrapers are beginning to pop up in that classic view. And while it’s likely many an architects’ dream to contribute a design to the most famous skyline in the world, only a handful of world-renowned “starchitects” get to do it. Ahead, 6sqft has rounded up 11 starchitect-designed condo buildings that you can actually live in, from veterans like Robert A.M. Stern and Renzo Piano to some more up-and-comers like David Adjaye and Bjarke Ingels.

See the list

Bushwick, Landscape Architecture, Major Developments, New Developments, Urban Design, Williamsburg

All renderings © James Corner Field Operations and BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group, courtesy of Two Trees Management

Two new mixed-use towers with 1,000 units of housing and six acres of public space have been proposed for the North Brooklyn waterfront. Two Trees Management on Thursday unveiled plans to bring two Bjarke Ingels Group-designed buildings, one at 650 feet and the other at 600 feet, on River Street between North 1st and North 3rd Street in Williamsburg. The buildings, with Metropolitan Avenue running between them, will serve as an entrance to the new waterfront space, part of a master plan designed in collaboration with BIG and James Corner Field Operations. The park and public beach would close the gap between Grand Ferry Park and North Fifth Park, eventually providing continuous access to the East River between South Williamsburg and Greenpoint.

Check out the whole project

Architecture, Midtown East, New Developments

Photo of One Vanderbilt on December 11, 2019 © 6sqft

After attending a presentation by One Vanderbilt‘s developer SL Green, the Post was able to share some juicy new details on the office building’s observation deck, which will be the second-highest outdoor deck in the city and is being designed by Snøhetta. Now known as The Summit at One Vanderbilt, the 59th-floor deck will have “two step-out, glass floor ledges that overhang Madison Avenue.” Also on this floor will be food and beverage options, and on the floor below will be an “‘infinity room’ with 40-foot-high ceilings.” The building is set to open in August 2020, while the Summit will begin welcoming guests (who will pay $35 for the experience) at the end of 2021.

More details right here

Architecture, Design, Green Design

Image by Pexels from Pixabay

The New York City Council approved on Tuesday a bill requiring new buildings to be constructed with bird-friendly materials. Considered the most extensive policy of its kind in the country, the initiative mandates new glass buildings, as well as projects undergoing a major renovation, to be equipped with materials that are easier for birds to see. Each year, between roughly 90,000 and 230,000 birds die each year in New York City from colliding with glass buildings, according to the NYC Audubon.  Learn more

Architecture, Museums

Fotografiska, CetraRuddy, Church Missions House, 281 Park Avenue South, Photography museum

Renderings courtesy of CetraRuddy

Stockholm-based photography museum Fotografiska is opening its first stateside outpost in New York City this month. Housed inside the former Church Missions House at 281 Park Avenue South, the organization will bring 45,000 square feet of exhibition and event spaces, alongside a restaurant inspired by European “grand cafés.” New York firm CetraRuddy led the restoration and redesign of the landmarked space, working with Higgins Quasebarth & Partners to preserve the stained-glass windows and limestone and granite facade of the Renaissance Revival building.

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Architecture, History

TWA Hotel, TWA, JFK Airport

Photo: TWA Hotel/David Mitchell

The state last week awarded ten projects with historic preservation awards, and nominated a dozen other sites to be nominated for the state and national historic places registers. Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation recognized the TWA Hotel at JFK Airport for its preservation of Eero Saarinen’s Trans World Airlines terminal, which serves as the lobby for a new 512-room hotel.

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