Architecture

Architecture, New Developments, New Jersey

Rendering of Harborside Tower, courtesy of Mack-Cali and SJP Properties

In conjunction with a larger plan to transform Jersey City into a waterfront destination, real estate investors Mack-Cali and SJP Properties announced on Tuesday a proposal for a 40-story office building that will implement the latest in “intelligent building” technology. Located just seven minutes to Manhattan via the PATH, Harborside Tower, designed by FXFOWLE, will feature a sleek glass and steel facade, with 1.2 million square feet of space for businesses. In addition to the office space, the tower will feature two units of retail space, one at 12,000 square feet and the other at 25,000 square feet, found just off the lobby.

Renderings this way

Architecture, hudson yards, Major Developments, New Developments

3 Hudson Boulevard loses 100+ feet in new renderings

By Devin Gannon, Wed, November 1, 2017

A new rendering of 3 Hudson Boulevard, via FXFOWLE/Moinian Group

A revised proposal for the Moinian Group’s Hudson Yards tower 3 Hudson Boulevard calls for a slight height chop, which will strip it of its supertall status. A redesign from FXFOWLE now brings the total square footage to 2 million square feet from a previous 1.8 million and lowers its height to 940 feet tall from 1,050 feet. Instead of 63 floors, the tower will rise 53 floors in this new design. To match standards for today’s modern office, the building will now feature larger floor plates, higher ceilings and a terrace on the eighth floor. As the New York Post reported, a groundbreaking ceremony will be held this Friday with elected officials, celebrating the reboot.

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Architecture, Midtown East, New Developments

Nearly a year ago, developer SL Green confirmed that their 1,401-foot supertall One Vanderbilt, set to be the city’s second tallest building behind One World Trade Center, would boast a 1,020-foot observation deck, which would have made it the third-highest indoor-outdoor observatory in the city after the forthcoming 1,100-foot deck at 30 Hudson Yards and the 1,050-foot deck at the Empire State Building (One World Observatory is at 1,250 feet, but it’s not outdoors). However, new details and diagrams uncovered by NY Yimby show that it may actually stand at 1,100 feet, tying for the city’s highest.

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Architecture, Design, Midtown East

550 Madison Avenue, Snohetta, Sony Building

Rendering of 550 Madison Avenue, via DBOX/ Snøhetta

Over the last few years, plans to refurbish the former headquarters of AT&T and Sony Building at 550 Madison Avenue have come and gone, including a proposal to convert the upper floors into luxury condos designed by Robert A.M. Stern. Now, with those plans long abandoned, Olayan America and Chelsfield revealed plans on Monday for a $300 million renovation of the tower, modernizing the lower levels of the building with high-quality amenities and a sprawling 21,000-square-foot public garden. With Snøhetta as lead architect, the renovation will be the first major project in East Midtown since its revitalization plan was approved earlier this year.

See the new design

Major Developments, New Developments, Starchitecture, Williamsburg

292-314 Kent, BEYER BLINDER BELLE, DOMINO REFINERY, DOMINO SUGAR FACTORY, JED WALENTAS, PAU, SHOP ARCHITECTS, TWO TREES MANAGEMENT COMPANY, VISHAAN CHAKRABARTI

292-314 Kent. Rendering by Practice for Architecture and Urbanism via Landmarks Preservation Commission.

Update 10/31/17: The Landmarks Preservation Commission did not approve the new plans at the hearing, instead suggesting the architects present revised designs that address how the newly exposed brick will be preserved and how the ground floor will interact with the open space. The Commissioners were divided on the glass topper, with some feeling it appropriately references the building’s arches and others feeling it inappropriately treats the structure as a ruin. 

6sqft previously shared the latest round of designs for the three million-square-foot Domino Sugar Factory mega-development in Williamsburg, done by Vishaan Chakrabarti‘s Practice for Architecture and Urbanism (PAU). Developer Two Trees broke ground on the first tower in the Domino Sugar Refinery Master Plan last spring, and the lottery opened for 104 affordable units at the SHoP Architects-designed building, the 16-story 325 Kent Avenue. Now, more new renderings of the complex have been released ahead of an October 31 presentation before the Landmarks Preservation Commission (h/t Brownstoner).

More new renderings this way

Architecture, condos, Greenwich Village, New Developments, Starchitecture

If there’s one neighborhood in NYC where new developments face the most challenges it’s Greenwich Village. One of the city’s first historic districts and once home to preservation godmother Jane Jacobs, the low-scale community is arguably the most vocal and steadfast in the city. But it looks like Madison Realty Capital didn’t get the memo, as they’ve tapped starchitect Robert A.M. Stern to design a hulking, 27-story condo tower at 14 Fifth Avenue, just a block north of Washington Square Park, according to NY Yimby. And while Stern’s signature classy, limestone design fits in well with the stretch’s other apartment buildings, the proposed 367-foot height will likely not sit well with locals. However, at this point, the tower is merely conceptual and will still require a public review need Landmarks Preservation Commission approvals.

More looks and details

Architecture, Construction Update, Tribeca

187 FRANKLIN STREET, JEREMY EDMISTON, SYSTEM ARCHITECTS, TOWNHOUSES, tribeca

First glimpse of Jeremy Edmiston’s “Unhistoric Townhouse” at 187 Franklin Street. Photo courtesy of Tribeca Citizen.

The latest Tribeca distraction: the partial unveiling of the single-family townhouse at 187 Franklin Street, a funky flame-façaded new building that its architect,  Jeremy Edmiston of System Architects, refers to as the Unhistoric Townhouse. Tribeca Citizen reports that workers at the building (which also resembles a Yankees logo) were lifting off some of the mesh that conceals the wavy wonder, perhaps to install one of its metal-mesh balconies. 6sqft previously covered the building, whose design of an undulating red façade complemented by those silvery, net-like balconies was first proposed in 2010.

Landmarks approved rendering, this way

Architecture, condos, New Developments, Nomad

262 Fifth Avenue, Meganom, Nomad towers, NYC supertalls

Rendering via DBOX for Meganom

There will be a lot of firsts at 262 Fifth AvenueNomad‘s first supertall, Moscow-based firm Meganom‘s first U.S. project, and NYC’s first Russian-designed supertall. 6sqft first uncovered renderings of the super-skinny, 1,009-foot skyscraper in May, revealing its aluminum and glass facade and “striking arched observation deck” at its top. Now, Yimby has gotten its hands on a new rendering, just a day after the Department of Buildings approved plans for the project.

See the new rendering in full

Chelsea, condos, New Developments, Starchitecture

Zaha Hadid, 520 West 28th Street, Chelsea condos

Closings commenced at the late Zaha Hadid‘s futurist 520 West 28th Street at the end of June, coming in above their original asking prices, and over the summer the curvaceous condo welcomed its first residences. According to a press release from developer Related, now that move-ins are underway, the architects have revealed photos of the fully amenitized interiors, which includes one of the world’s first private IMAX theaters, a 75-foot sky-lit lap pool, a High Line-adjacent terrace and landscaped courtyard, and a fitness center complete with a 24-hour juice bar and plunge pool.

See all the renderings

Featured Story

Architecture, East Village, Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History

Off the grid: The little Flatiron Buildings of the Village

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, October 19, 2017

The Flatiron Building is one of the city’s most iconic and beloved landmarks. Since 1902 it’s been a symbol of New York, though ironically its acute angle formed by the intersection of Broadway and Fifth Avenue makes it an unusual sight in our otherwise orthogonal city on a grid. But while the Flatiron Building may be the most famous product of quirky street angles, it’s far from the only one. In fact, the “off-the-grid” streets of Greenwich Village and the East Village contain scores of them, most of which pre-date the 23rd Street landmark.

Take a tour of the little Flatirons

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