Architecture

Architecture, Construction Update, hudson yards, New Developments

Rendering via FXFOWLE/Moinian Group (L); Current construction shot via CityRealty (R)

Earlier this month, a new view of 3 Hudson Boulevard added a 300-foot spire, bringing its total height to 1,350 and setting it up to become the tallest tower in Hudson Yards and the fifth tallest in the entire city. However, CityRealty has uncovered another new rendering of the FXFOWLE-designed supertall, which was posted at the work site now that construction has commenced, and noticeably absent is the spire. While the superlative height isn’t confirmed, the new rendering does maintain the updated design of a five-story retail podium, tapered body, terraces and “sky gardens,” and a rooftop terrace surrounded by glass windscreens.

More details ahead

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History

John Jacob Astor House, Mrs. Caroline Astor-NYC 5th avenue mansions, Manhattan's Gold Coast, Gilded Age Mansions, manhattan mansions, John Jacob Astor House-.840 Fifth Avenue- Mrs. Caroline Astor-NYC

Mrs. Astor’s House on 65th Street and Fifth Avenue. Image via Library of Congress

Last week, 6sqft went through the many mansions, predominately lost, along Millionaire’s Row on Fifth Avenue up to 59th Street. Most of this stretch has been converted into upscale luxury retail and corporate skyscrapers, but Millionaire’s Row continued northwards along Central Park, which opened in 1857. Though some have been lost, a significant number of these opulent Gilded Age mansions still stand within this more residential zone. The AIA Guide to New York City calls this area of Fifth Avenue from 59th Street to 78th Street the “Gold Coast,” and rightly so.

Walking up 5th Avenue, you’ll first pass the decadent Sherry-Netherland Hotel with its recently uncovered 1927 Beaux-Arts mural and the Stanford White-designed Metropolitan Club, founded by J.P. Morgan in 1891 for friends who were rejected from the old-money Knickerbocker Club. But even before the construction of the Metropolitan Club, a mansion was rising less than a block away on 61st Street and Fifth Avenue.

Find out more about these incredible mansions here

Connecticut, Cool Listings, Starchitecture

Marcel Breuer, connecticut, estately, Donald N. Clark House

Acclaimed modernist architect Marcel Breuer is perhaps best known in New York for designing the original Whitney Museum of Art, now home to the Met Breuer. But his work wasn’t limited to iconic museums–he also designed homes, like this one in Orange, Connecticut. The 4,000-square-foot abode known as the Donald N. Clark House was built in the 1950s with stone, ceilings of wood, and open, airy patios. The owner has also filled the house, as well as the 5.5-acre property, with unique artwork and sculptures. And it could be yours for $1.6 million.

Take a look inside

Architecture, Midtown, New Developments

1568 Broadway, Palace Theatre, Times Square

Rendering of the Palace Theatre entrance via Maefield Development

Two years since the plan’s approval by the LPC, the redevelopment of the historic Palace Theatre at 1568 Broadway is nearly ready to take off. The theater will be raised 29 feet above its current level, making room for 70,000 square feet of new retail and entertainment space. With help earlier this month from L&L Holding Company, who became an equity and development partner, the ambitious project continues to progress; as CityRealty discovered, new renderings show the theater enveloped by an expanded Doubletree Guest Suites hotel, a new glass facade, and a sweeping LED screen at its podium. And though the gilded Beaux-Arts interiors will be preserved (they’re interior landmarks), some preservationists have expressed concerns that moving the actual structure is a bit too aggressive.

Find out more

Architecture, Brooklyn, Design, Interiors

Gleich House, BFDO Architects, Brooklyn renovation, rowhouse renovation, Barker Freeman

Photo courtesy of BFDO Architects

Brooklyn townhouses aren’t exactly known for their light-filled, modern interiors. But BFDO Architects (aka Barker Freeman Architects) had the opportunity to completely re-imagine this 20-foot wood-frame home, which came with a four-foot-wide side yard as well as front and rear extensions. The goal: bring in light wherever possible and bring textures to the exterior and interior in the forms of natural wood, gray tones, and graphic tile patterns. The firm “selectively carved and expanded” each room, adding skylights and window walls to create a super bright, super open house that welcomes you inside.

Time to go in

Construction Update, Starchitecture, Top Stories, Williamsburg

325 Kent Avenue , Domino Sugar Factory , James Corner Field Operations, SHoP Architects

Image by CityRealty

Just over one year ago, 6sqft reported on the initial climb of 325 Kent Avenue, the first tower of the SHoP-designed Domino Sugar Refinery master plan slated for the Williamsburg waterfront. Now, CityRealty shares that the building is nearly finished with its distinct, upside-down U-formation standing tall. When complete, the 189-foot, 400,000-square-foot building will be the second largest residential structure in the neighborhood (just after 2 North 6th Street), fronted by a spectacular 11-acre park designed by James Corner Field Operations that will open next summer.

see more photos

Architecture, Chelsea, Cool Listings, Design, Starchitecture

520 West 28th Street, Zaha Hadid, Related Companies, High Line 2

520 West 28th Street via Zaha Hadid Architects

Just last month, closings began on Zaha Hadid’s 520 West 28th Street, a structure 6sqft crowned as Building of the Year in 2016. Now, rental apartments at the luxury residential building have officially hit the market (h/t Curbed NY). The late architect’s signature curved and organic architectural style is complemented with interiors like a marble-clad kitchen island, glass walls and energy-efficient lighting. In total, the building has 39 units, with three currently on the rental market: Units No. 31, No. 17 and No. 18. The three units range from $15,000 per month to $22,500 per month.

Take a peek inside

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Architecture, Features, History, Manhattan

The Cornelius Vanderbilt II Mansion on 57th Street and 5th Avenue, now demolished. Photo via A.D. White Architectural Photographs, Cornell University Library.

New York City’s Fifth Avenue has always been pretty special, although you’d probably never guess that it began with a rather ordinary and functional name: Middle Road. Like the 1811 Commissioner’s Plan for Manhattan, which laid out the city’s future expansion in a rational manner, Middle Road was part of an earlier real estate plan by the City Council. As its name suggests, Middle Road was situated in the middle of a large land parcel that was sold by the council in 1785 to raise municipal funds for new newly established nation. Initially, it was the only road to provide access to this yet-undeveloped portion of Manhattan, but two additional roads were built later (eventually becoming Park Avenue and Sixth Avenue).

The steady northwards march of upscale residences, and the retail to match, has its origins where Fifth Avenue literally begins: in the mansions on Washington Square Park. Madison Square was next, but it would take a combination of real-estate clairvoyance and social standing to firmly establish Fifth Avenue as the center of society.

More on how the gilded mansions of 5th Avenue came to be

hudson yards, Midtown West, New Developments, Starchitecture

50 Hudson Yards, Related Companies, Norman Foster, Hudson Yards architecture

A decade after first embarking on Hudson Yards–the largest private development in the nation’s history–developer Related Companies is in the thick of things, with listings live at 15 and One Hudson Yards and construction underway at 30, 35, and 55, as well as The Shed cultural center and the Vessel public art piece. Keeping the momentum moving, Yimby has now uncovered a new rendering of Norman Foster‘s 985-foot 50 Hudson Yards, which at $3.94 billion will be the city’s most expensive office tower, and the first view of the food and beverage pavilion that will sit in the Eastern Railyard.

All the details ahead

Architecture, Design, hudson yards, Technology, Top Stories

The Shed courtesy of Diller Scofidio +Renfro, via The New York Times

Construction of The Shed, a six-level flexible structure that can adapt to different art forms and technologies, continues to progress where the High Line meets Hudson Yards. While the building, an independent non-profit cultural organization, has an expected opening date of 2019, the massive eight-million-pound structure can now slide along the High Line for five minutes on a half-dozen exposed steel wheels that measure six-feet in diameter (h/t NY Times). The Shed, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, in collaboration with Rockwell Group, features a movable shell on rails that sits over the fixed base of the building, allowing for it to change size depending on the type of event.

See the Shed slide

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