Architecture

Architecture, condos, Design, Interiors, Midtown West

All photos by Evan Joseph

The private club and wellness center at Jean Nouvel’s residential tower in Midtown West is a work of art. New images of the lavish full-floor space at 53 West 53, which rises adjacent to the Museum of Modern Art, were released this week, unveiling for the first time the club’s elegant gym, squash court, golf simulator, saunas, and 65-foot lap pool that is surrounded by a green wall made up of 3,500 plants.

See more

Featured Story

Features, History, Landscape Architecture, Upstate

Photo © 6sqft

Located just over an hour from Grand Central Terminal on Metro North’s Hudson line, the renowned Untermyer Gardens is a 43-acre historic park in Yonkers that features a Persian Paradise garden, a small amphitheater, a classical pavilion, the “Temple of Love,” and a “Vista” staircase. The park was developed in the early 20th century by philanthropist Samuel Untermyer, who purchased the estate in 1899. For 40 years, Untermyer transformed the sprawling greenery into some of the most acclaimed gardens in the United States, known today as “America’s Greatest Forgotten Garden.” Following his death, the property was not well maintained and fell into disrepair. For the last ten years, the Untermyer Garden Conservancy has worked to restore the site to its former glory and to provide a beautiful public space for all.

Find out more

affordable housing, Architecture, Brownsville

All photos of Edwin’s Place © Francis Dzikowski/OTTO

An affordable housing development designed by an architecture firm known for its pricey condo towers officially opened in Brooklyn this week. Located on the corner of Livonia Avenue and Grafton Street in Brownsville, Edwin’s Place was designed by Robert A.M. Stern Architects (RAMSA), the team behind renowned buildings like 220 Central Park South, 15 Central Park West, and 70 Vestry Street, all of which have apartments that cost millions of dollars. At Edwin’s Place, there are 125 units of affordable and supportive housing set aside for formerly homeless families and low-income New Yorkers.

Find out more

adaptive reuse, Architecture, Chelsea

Rendering by Gensler/TMRW

With construction financing secured and new renderings released, the conversion of the historic Terminal Warehouse in Chelsea into a holistic office complex is moving forward. L&L Holding Company and Columbia Property Trust announced last week they closed on a $1.25 billion construction loan for the project, which involves restoring and adapting the former freight distribution hub into modern office space that incorporates original design elements. New renderings show off the project’s planned cascading terraces and interior courtyard, rooftop amenity, and ground-floor cafe.

Learn more

Architecture, Financial District, Major Developments

The Perelman at night, facing south © Luxigon

About a month after the Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center (PAC) topped out at the World Trade Center complex, new renderings of the unique project were released this week. As first spotted by Yimby, images showcase the flexible cube-shaped building and its glowing marble facade, the grand staircase, theaters, bar and restaurant, and terrace space. First envisioned nearly two decades prior, PAC is expected to open in 2023.

See more

affordable housing, Bed Stuy, Starchitecture

Rendering of The Atrium at Sumner. © 2019 New York City Housing Authority

Architect Daniel Libeskind, perhaps best known for the Jewish Museum in Berlin and the World Trade Center master plan, is one step closer to completing his first building in New York City. The New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) announced that they have secured financing for an all-affordable senior housing building in Brooklyn’s Bed-Stuy designed by the starchitect. The 190-unit Atrium at Sumner will be built on NYCHA’s Sumner Houses campus, with construction set to begin later this month on the $132 million project. The 11-story building will meet Passive House standards and feature a community garden, a year-round indoor garden, and a central atrium.

More details here

Architecture, Construction Update, Downtown Brooklyn, Major Developments

Photos by Michael Young

Brooklyn’s first supertall hit a major milestone this week. In Downtown Brooklyn, the skyscraper under construction at 9 DeKalb Avenue reached 721 feet, developer JDS Development Group announced on Wednesday. Designed by SHoP Architects, 9 DeKalb is now more than halfway to its pinnacle of 1,066 feet, officially snatching the title of the borough’s tallest tower from Extell Development’s 720-foot-tall Brooklyn Point. A building is labeled as a supertall if it reaches over 300 meters, or 984 feet.

See more here

Architecture, Chelsea, condos, Design

All photos by Colin Miller

As construction wraps up on Thomas Heatherwick’s condo project on the High Line, new images were released of the building’s “secret” garden. Located at 515 West 18th Street, Lantern House consists of two towers that straddle either side of the elevated park. The recently completed garden, envisioned by Hollander Design to resemble a woodland oasis, sits directly under the High Line and next to the freestanding lobby that links the towers.

Get the details

Architecture, Green Design, Upstate

All photos courtesy of Brad Dickson / River Architects, PLLC

Located in the foothills of the Catskill Mountains overlooking the Delaware River Valley, the world’s first Passive House-certified cidery is now open. The Callicoon-based Seminary Hill Orchard & Cidery was designed as a low energy-use structure, with an air-tight thermal envelope, triple pane windows, and photovoltaic solar panels. Designed by River Architects, the structure is not only sustainable but architecturally appealing, flaunting gapped wood siding, interiors clad with reclaimed wood from the pilings of the original Tappan Zee Bridge, and lovely views of the apple orchard.

Get the details

Landscape Architecture, Policy, Urban Design

All renderings courtesy of SeeThree and ODA

When the coronavirus pandemic hit New York City last spring, the city launched a successful effort to give pedestrians safe outdoor space through its”Open Streets” program, which closed some streets to cars. Extremely popular with New Yorkers, the initiative, along with its Open Restaurants and Open Culture counterparts, was expanded and made permanent this year. A local architecture firm is looking to capitalize on this reclamation of public city space with a new proposal aimed at reviving the once blossoming Flower District.

Find out more

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.