Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Urban Design

Pier 55, Hudson River Park Trust, Barry Diller

Floating space in New York’s waterways is not a new concept. Take the +Pool, for example, the public pool proposed for the East River that was recently supported by Kanye West. But a new offshore park proposed for the Hudson River off 14th Street seems exceedingly ambitious, as it would cost $170 million, be located 186 feet off land, and contain wooded nooks and three performance venues including an amphitheater.

Barry Diller, sponsor-to-be of this ambitious plan, gives the project a much more realistic outlook. The billionaire chairman of IAC/InterActiveCorp, former head of Paramount Pictures and Fox–and husband to Diane von Furstenberg–was the single largest donor to the High Line. He’s pledged $130 million from the Diller-von Furstenberg Family Foundation to make the 2.7-acre park a realty, as well as agreed to run the outdoor space and cover operating expenses for 20 years. He and his wife have starchitect-designed offices in the Meatpacking District and are clearly becoming king and queen of the neighborhood.

More on the futuristic park ahead

Architecture, Hamptons, Landscape Architecture

Tsao & McKown, half-buried home, Sagaponac House, Wainscott, New York, Richard Meier, privacy and openness,

Calvin Tsao and Zack McKown, partners of Tsao & McKown, designed a stunning minimalist home in Wainscott, New York–a community planned by Richard Meier. The Sagaponac House was created for a hypothetical client, and due to an alteration to the terrain the home is partially underground. This roots it in the landscape while offering both privacy and openness toward the young forest around it.

Learn more about this half-buried home

Architecture, Events, History, Landscape Architecture

the lowline park, the lowline historic

Ever since architects James Ramsey and Dan Barasch announced their plan to turn a forgotten trolley terminal below Delancey Street into an underground park, design enthusiasts, urban planners, locals, celebs, and, well, just about everyone who’s caught wind of it has been waiting in anticipation for what’s to come. The push to make this cool concept a reality continues on strong, even four years after the first unveiling (not that long when you consider that the High Line Park was a 15-year-long project!), and next Wednesday, November 12th at 6:30PM, the Lowline creators will be hosting a brand new event that will give New Yorkers the chance to discover the history of the former subterranean streetcar station built in 1908 and abandoned in 1948. The park’s creators have partnered with historic preservation researchers at Higgins Quasebarth to present their latest research, findings and the science behind the Lowline at a FREE public talk at the Tenement Museum at 103 Orchard Street.

Space is limited and is first-come, first-served, so get there early! And if you can’t swing by the museum you can also watch or listen to the talk remotely.

Chinatown, Landscape Architecture, Lower East Side, Urban Design

Forsyth Plaza NYC

If you’ve ever walked or biked across the Manhattan Bridge, or simply tried to make your way past the off-ramp on foot, you know that it can be a heart-thumping jaunt that often requires expert maneuvering to avoid collision. A new design proposed for a triangular section of land beside the Manhattan Bridge along Forsyth Street could bring some much-needed calm to the frenetic energy of this area. Tomorrow, the Department of Design and Construction will present their plan to transform this elevated space into a public green space that’s being likened to the High Line Park.

Find out more here

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Major Developments, Staten Island

New York City Farm Colony, landmark colony, NFC Associates, New York City Economic Development Corporation, Pablo E. Vengoechea , Timothy G. Boyland, Vengoechea + Boyland Architecture

Staten Island’s renaissance continues to move full steam ahead as the Landmarks Preservation Commission has unanimously approved the rehab of the long-abandoned poorhouse and farm located on the oft forgotten borough. Curbed reports that the New York City Farm Colony will be redeveloped into 350 units of senior housing with some retail space in a new eco-minded project called ‘Landmark Colony’. The plan, which is being spearheaded by NFC Associates in cooperation with the New York City Economic Development Corporation and Vengoechea + Boyland Architecture was lauded for its site-sensitive design and ample green space.

find out more here

Green Design, Greenpoint, Landscape Architecture

james corner field, east river waterfront, brooklyn real estate,

Renderings for the waterfront park to be built alongside the massive housing development Greenpoint Landing have been released. Flooding from Hurricane Sandy ravaged the area only a few years back, so it comes as no surprise that the local community was concerned with how the developers were going to address the possibility of damaging storm swells in the future. Despite their concerns the park’s designer James Corner Field Operations has used intelligent design and beautiful landscaping to enhance the structural integrity and aesthetic appeal of the existing riverfront.

Read more

Green Design, Harlem, Landscape Architecture, Major Developments

harlem promenade, harlem high line

The success of the High Line Park continues to inspire all corners of the world—including Queens—and now the latest neighborhood to jump on the elevated park bandwagon is Harlem. DNA Info reports a nonprofit called the Housing Partnership has proposed a plan to bring 2,000 affordable housing units and $170 million dedicated to public projects in Hamilton Heights. The new park encompassed within the nonprofit’s ‘Harlem Promenade‘ plan would run alongside the West Side Highway atop a portion of Amtrak rail lines.

More on the proposed harlem high line project here

Featured Story

Architecture, Cool Listings, Features, Landscape Architecture

Flowerbox Building, Living Wall, Vertical Garden, Landscape Architecture, NYC condo

Built in 2007, The Flowerbox condo building at 259 East Seventh Street, about mid-way between Avenues C and D, is considered by many to be one of the city’s most beautiful new developments–and definitely a neighborhood standout, featuring a vertical garden that waters itself.

The building boom that started with the 21st century and has continued apace since the end of the most recent economic downturn has given Downtown Manhattan an impressive collection of starchitect-designed creations, complete with Sky Garages, Boxwood Mazes and plenty of glass curtain walls. But the Flowerbox Building continues to charm with its design, quality and curb appeal.

Find out about the vertical

Featured Story

Features, Interviews, Landscape Architecture, New Yorker Spotlight, People, Staten Island, Urban Design

Eloise Hirsch, Freshkills Park

Similar to Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux’s grand ideas for Central Park, there is a vision for the 2,200 acres of reclaimed land at the former Fresh Kills Landfill on Staten Island. Where trash once piled up for as far as the eye could see, the site is now a blossoming park full of wildlife and recreational activities.

The Park Administrator overseeing this incredible transformation is Eloise Hirsh. Eloise is a major force behind the largest landfill-to-park conversion in the world to date. In her role as Freshkills Park Administrator, she makes sure the park progresses towards its completion date in 2035, and regularly engages with New Yorkers to keep them informed and excited.

6sqft recently spoke with Eloise to learn more about Fresh Kills’ history, what it takes to reclaim land, and what New Yorkers can expect at the park today and in the years to come.

Read the full interview here

Featured Story

City Living, Features, Goldilocks Blocks, Landscape Architecture, Neighborhoods

Goldilocks Blocks: (Far) East 7th Street in Alphabet City

By Michelle Cohen, Mon, September 22, 2014

Flowerbox, New Development, Condo, East Village, NYC

Between hyper-developed hotspots, main drags in up-and-comers, big-ticket townhouse enclaves, and those genuinely avoidable areas, there can often be found a city’s “just-right” zones. Free from corner menace, sticker shock and boom-time developer schlock, these special spots often span only a few blocks in each direction and are close enough to the center of their ‘cool destination’ nabes to legitimately bear their names. They aren’t commonly known, and are best found by pounding the pavement, but these micro-neighborhoods often hide within them real estate gems coupled with perfectly offbeat vibes—you just have to be willing to do a little legwork. But when you do find them, don’t sleep on them… Winners like the Columbia Street Waterfront District were once Goldilocks blocks.

Today we’ll look at a unique 7th Street stretch hidden in Alphabet City.

Find out what makes this Alphabet City block so special.

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