housing lotteries

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Lower East Side

Essex Crossing Site 5, 145 Clinton Street, Beyer Blinder Belle (1)

It’s been almost exactly a year since Beyer Blinder Belle released renderings of Essex Crossing‘s site 5, a $110 million, 15-story mixed-use building that will give way to 73,000 square feet of retail space, where Trader Joes and Planet Fitness will move in, and a 15,000-square-foot adjacent park. Located just a block southwest of the Manhattan entrance of the Williamsburg Bridge at 145 Clinton Street, it will have 211 rental units, half of which will be reserved for low- and middle-income individuals. These 104 affordable apartments are now available through the city’s online housing lottery, the first of the mega-development’s 561 affordable residences to come online. They’re set aside for those earning 40, 60, 120, and 165 percent of the area media income and range from $519/month studios to $3,424/month three-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

Compass Residences, Crotona Park East, West Farms Redevelopment Plan, 1544 Boone Avenue, Dattner Architects

Back in 2011, Dattner Architects created the West Farms Redevelopment Plan, a rezoning (the largest ever in the Bronx at the time) of a 17-acre, 11-block former industrial area in Crotona Park East. The plan calls for a total of 1,325 affordable housing units, 46,000 square feet of retail, and community facilities. Dattner’s first two buildings in the complex are called theCompass Residences, which provide 237 apartments arranged around a series of courtyards. This past December, 114 of these residences at 1544 Boone Avenue came online through the city’s affordable housing lottery, and now, 120 more at 1524 Boone Avenue are open to New Yorkers earning 60 and 90 percent of the area median income, ranging from $822/month studios to $1,740/month three-bedrooms.

Find out here if you qualify

affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

Starting today, 227 brand new affordable apartments are up for grabs at 4275 Park Avenue in the Bronx. The residence, dubbed Park House, is a new construction designed by COOKFOX Architects and developed by Breaking Ground, a non-profit organization that matches low-income New Yorkers with homes. Park House is the first affordable project undertaken by the organization and will offer energy-efficient studio, one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments priced between $494 and $1181 to qualifying applicants earning between 40 and 60 percent of the area median income.

more details here

affordable housing, Downtown Brooklyn, housing lotteries

33 Bond Street, Handel Architects, TF Cornerstone, Downtown Brooklyn affordable housing, Downtown Brooklyn rentals

A new 25-story rental building in booming Downtown Brooklyn is nearing completion at 33 Bond Street, just a block or two away from almost every subway line and a few blocks from BAM. Developer TF Cornerstone paid $70 million for the site, a former parking garage, in early 2014, partnering with Handel Architects on the rather standard, bulky, glassy design. In total, there will be 714 apartments, 143 of which have been set aside as affordable. These below-market rate units are now up for grabs through the city’s affordable housing lottery and range from $897/month studios to $1,166/two-bedrooms for households earning 60 percent of the area median income.

Find out if you qualify

affordable housing, Harlem, housing lotteries

2139 Third Avenue, East Harlem rental, East Harlem affordable housing

With the Second Avenue Subway sending Upper East Side real estate prices climbing as far north as 96th Street, East Harlem‘s upward trajectory is sure to only heat up. The former El Barrio has been on the cusp of gentrification since a 2003, 57-block rezoning that increased density allowances along First, Second, and Third Avenues, spurring a bevy of new residential projects. One such development is 2139 Third Avenue, a modern, 21-unit rental at the corner of 117th Street, which just launched its affordable housing lottery for five $985/month one-bedroom units, available to one- or two-person households earning no more than 60 percent of the area median income.

Have a look at the interiors

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Stuy Town

stuyvesant town

It’s been almost a year since Stuyvesant Town opened a 15,000-name wait list for its affordable apartments, and they’ve now launched another lottery, this time for households earning between $84,150 and $149,490 annually. The availabilities are spread throughout Stuy Town and Peter Cooper Village and include $2,805/month one-bedrooms and $3,366/month two-bedrooms.

Find out more

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Murray Hill

210 East 39th Street, CB Developers, Murray Hill rental, Rawlings Architects

A little over two years ago, Charles Blaichman’s CB Developers began construction on a 19-story, mixed-use building at 210 East 39th Street. Designed by Rawlings Architects, the Murray Hill building has a ground-floor retail podium, glassy second-story amenity space, and terra cotta rainscreen-clad frame. In all, there will be 57 rental units, 11 of which are set aside for those earning no more than 60 percent of the area media income. These affordable apartments include one $833/month studio, seven $895/month one-bedrooms, and three $1,082/month two-bedrooms.

Find out more about the building and the lottery

affordable housing, Harlem, housing lotteries

Second to the Bronx, Central Harlem has seen perhaps the most new affordable housing opportunities in the city. The latest is a 40-unit lottery spread across four buildings near Jackie Robinson Park–304 West 152nd Street, 232 West 149th Street, 2797 Frederick Douglass Boulevard, and 2472 Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Boulevard. The units are available to those earning 50 or 60 percent of the area media income and range from $822/month studios to $1,371/month four-bedrooms.

Find out more

affordable housing, Downtown Brooklyn, housing lotteries, New Developments, Rentals

Rendering of 86 Fleet Place via Goldstein, Hill & West (L); Construction as of October 2016, via CityRealty

Way back in 1982, the CEO and owner of Red Apple Group, John Catsimatidis (you may know him better as the billionaire owner of Gristedes or for his failed Republican run in the last mayoral election) paid $500,000 for a 2.5-acre, four-block site in Downtown Brooklyn, on the western edge of Fort Greene. Thirty-five years later, construction is wrapping up on the final, and by far the tallest, of the four-tower development. The curving glass building at 86 Fleet Place was designed by Goldstein, Hill & West and will rise 32 stories/350 feet and house 440 rentals, 29 of which are set aside as affordable and have just come online through the city’s affordable housing lottery. They range from $833/month studios to $1,247/month three-bedrooms and are available for those earning 45 to 60 percent of the area media income.

Find out if you qualify here

affordable housing, housing lotteries, New Developments, Prospect Heights, Rentals

Last spring, the first housing lottery opened at Pacific Park Brooklyn when 181 affordable units at SHoP’s 461 Dean Street (the world’s tallest modular tower) came online. It was followed a few months later by 298 openings at 535 Carlton Avenue, COOKFOX‘s entirely affordable building, and now the third set of apartments for low- to middle-income New Yorkers is open. SHoP Architects also designed an all-affordable building at 38 Sixth Avenue, adjacent to the Barclays Center, and as of today these 303 residences are up for grabs, ranging from $532/month studios to $3,695/month three-bedrooms. Households earning between 101 and 165 percent of the area media income (or up to $173,415 annually) are eligible for 198 of the units, while 105 units are set aside for those earning between 30 and 100 percent (as low as $20,126 a year).

More details and the whole qualification breakdown

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.