All posts by Dana Schulz

Dana is a writer and preservationist with a passion for all things New York.  After graduating from New York University with a BA in Urban Design & Architecture Studies, she worked at the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, where she planned the organization's public programs and wrote for their blog Off the Grid.  Currently, she writes for CIRCA, an online historic house marketplace, and leads walking tours about the cultural history of city neighborhoods. Follow her on Twitter @danaschulzNYC.

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Architecture, Events

Skyscraper Museum, Times Square history, Times Square architecture, Carol Willis, Times Square 1984: The Postmodern Moment

What’s now a Disney Land-like mix of big-brand stores like M&M’s and Hershey’s, the televised location for Good Morning America, and home to everyone’s favorite costumed characters, was once “the worst block in town.” During the 1970’s and 80’s, Times Square was filled with peep shows and porn theaters and riddled with crime. In 1984, in an effort to build taller and reduce crime while preserving the frantic energy and cultural heritage of the area, a design competition was organized by the Municipal Art Society and the National Endowment for the Arts. The debate among architects, developers, and preservationists came after plans were revealed for four skyscrapers near the intersection of 42nd Street, Broadway, and Seventh Avenue.

Now, a new exhibition at the downtown Skyscraper Museum will resurface the submissions from this design competition, exploring the history of Manhattan’s most recognizable crossroads.

More about the fascinating new exhibit “Times Square, 1984: The Postmodern Moment”

Flatiron, Interiors, Recent Sales

17 West 17th Street, Flatiron real estate, Flatiron loft, million dollar listing

It’s not often a flip yields a $4,655,000 profit in just four years, but that’s exactly what happened at the 10th-floor loft at 17 West 17th Street. The full-floor Flatiron apartment sold in 2010 for $3,095,000, but was a massive, raw studio at the time with only one bathroom and no formal kitchen. It’s now a true four-bedroom space with three additional bathrooms and a clear definition of rooms. The intensive renovation paid off, netting previous owner Peter Vogelsang, a lawyer with the Alberleen Group, an impressive $7.6 million, according to recent city records.

Let’s take a look at the profitable pad

Architecture, Design, Hamptons

Bromley Caldari Architects, Fire Island beach houses, Albert House, contemporary beach houses

Labor Day is upon us (sigh), and it’s time to make plans for the one final weekend of summer. Whether you’re heading to a backyard barbeque or pool party, we’d bet that you would drop those plans in a hot second if given the opportunity to hang at this Fire Island guest house.

Designed by Bromley Caldari Architects, the Albert House was the final component of a larger beachfront complex, which includes the main house, dining pavilion, gym, and beach/pool cabana. The client asked the architects to create an easy to maintain, open-plan guest house for their visiting family. Though the home is just steps away from the main complex, it still functions independently and feels like its very own shore retreat.

More on the seaside home

Flatbush, History

Loew's Kings Theatre, Loew's Wonder Theatres

After nearly four decades of sitting vacant, the majestic Loew’s Kings Theatre in Flatbush will reopen. It was announced in 2010 that the 1920s movie palace would be restored to its former gilded glory thanks to a $70 million renovation, and now it’s been revealed that the reopening will take place in January 2015.

The theatre closed in 1977, but according to a press release, the new Loew’s Kings Theatre “will serve as both a cultural and economic cornerstone for the Brooklyn community, presenting more than 200 performances annually—including music, dance, theatre, and comedy—providing a resource to foster and support creativity in the area, creating jobs and attracting thousands of visitors to the neighborhood.” It will also have 3,000 seats, making it the largest theatre in Brooklyn.

Take a look at the stunning, historic interiors

Products, Technology

You know those instances when your feet are killing you, your back is sore, and all you want to do is sit down, but, of course, there’s not a seat in sight? Well, these uncomfortable dilemmas can now be a thing of the past. In a bid to keep factory line workers more alert and comfortable during long, tedious shifts, Zurich-based startup noonee created the Chairless Chair, a locking leg support device that allows you take a load off regardless of where you are.

Read more

Weekly Highlights

Weekly Highlights: Top Picks From the 6sqft Staff

By Dana Schulz, Sat, August 23, 2014

morpholio, board 2.0, mood board morpholio, moodboardmonday, morpholio apps

Images: Mood Board App © The Morpholio Project (left); Tower House © Gluck+ (right)

Gramercy Park, real estate trends, Stuyvesant Town

Stuyvesant Square Park, Stuyvesant Square, NYC parks

That’s right–Stuyvesant Square is its own neighborhood. Haven’t heard of it? That may be because you’ve been confusing it with neighboring Gramercy Park or Stuyvesant Town. But in fact, this charming little neighborhood is a highly desirable enclave in its own right.

Situated around Stuyvesant Square Park, the area is bound roughly by 14th and 18th Streets and First and Third Avenues. It could be considered the southeastern corner of Gramercy Park or an extension of planned development Stuyvesant Town, but some real estate professionals like the exclusivity that the lesser-known moniker offers. Others have come up with creative alternatives like “Gramercy Park on Stuyvesant Square.” But regardless of what you call it, Stuyvesant Square has a unique blend of limited space, historic landmarks, and mixed uses that makes for a bustling New York City neighborhood.

More on Stuyvesant Square here

Architecture, Gramercy Park, Green Design, Interiors

Slade Architecture, Gramercy Duplex, environmentally friendly design

Oftentimes when environmentally friendly homes are designed the client wants to keep a low carbon footprint or be sensitive to the surrounding landscape. But there’s another very important reason to go green in residential design, which is personal health. And that’s exactly why Slade Architecture was asked to take an eco-friendly approach when creating this contemporary Gramercy Duplex.

The renovation combined two existing one-bedroom duplex units into a single two-bedroom duplex. All materials were specified as low VOC, including recycled denim insulation, recycled paper countertops, Low-e windows, and Eco Spec paint.

Take a look at how Slade created a functional space with a green mentality

Architecture, Hamptons

Amagansett New York, Hamptons beach houses, Whaler's Lane Residence, Rogers Marvel Architects.

As far as the Hamptons go, Amagansett is one of the most exclusive neighborhoods. From Lou Reed to Sarah Jessica Parker, celebrities love the quiet hamlet, located on Long Island’s South Shore. Eclectic beach houses dot the dune-lined beachfront, and one of our favorites is the Whaler’s Lane Residence by Rogers Marvel Architects.

A renovation and expansion of an existing oceanfront beach cottage, this home is made up of a series of shingle-wrapped exterior and interior spaces connected via wooden pathways. The original structure provided inspiration for the design, as the project maintained similar materials and profiles to create a contextual residence.

Explore the rest of this Hamptons hideaway

Featured Story

Battery Park City, Features, History, Major Developments, Midtown, Urban Design, Williamsburg

nyc master plan, master plan of manhattan, master planning new york

We often think of the street grid as New York’s greatest “master plan.” Officially known as the Commissioners’ Plan of 1811, this put in place the original, gridded street pattern that we still know today. But there have been several other master plans that took shape on a smaller scale within the linear configuration of Manhattan. These planned communities were largely conceived to transform blighted or underutilized areas into suburban enclaves or peaceful oases within the big city. And just like the neighborhoods that grew organically among the street grid, these master-planned areas each have a unique character. They’ve also influenced a new crop of developments, currently under construction on the West Side and in Brooklyn.

We take a look at planned communities that historically changed the fabric of the city, as well as those on the horizon

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