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affordable housing, housing lotteries, Staten Island

Go-to affordable housing firm Aufgang Architects and developer Arker Companies revealed renderings for a six-story, 67-unit building along Staten Island‘s Stapleton waterfront back in 2014. The under-construction project at 533 Bay Street, which offers low-income apartments for those 62 years of age and older, is now accepting applications for 44 of its units–three $686/month studios and 41 $737/month one-bedrooms, available to seniors earning up to 50 percent of the area media income. In addition to living in a brand-new building, residents will be in an up-and-coming area, where just a block away the massive rental development Urby is underway (the project boasts NYC’s first residential urban farm, as well as tons of retail space).

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Cool Listings, Interiors, Staten Island

This freestanding Victorian home was built at 204 Richmond Terrace on the Staten Island waterfront way back in the 1870s. Impressively, it still stands today and has hit the market for $2 million. Lots of historic details, like a curving staircase, fireplaces and wood carvings, can be found inside. Buyers also have some options upon purchase: the zoning allows for an expansion to the home, or they could replace the existing structure with a multi-story building of at least 10 apartments, retail and parking (but we’ve gotta say, we prefer what stands).

Tour the historic property

Polls, Staten Island

New York Wheel, Staten Island development, NY ferris wheel, Staten Island ferris wheel

Though the New York Wheel got its first shipment of crane parts last month, its opening has been pushed back from late 2017 to April of 2018, reports DNAinfo. Construction on the $580 million Staten Island Ferris wheel is still on track to finish up next year, at which time it will resemble the renderings, but “the wheel requires rigorous testing and commissioning that must be conducted to the highest standards,” said its CEO Rich Marin.

This is not the first time the project has been delayed, and it’s also been plagued by financial issues (it went $300 million over budget) and legal battles, but the developers are still optimistic. In fact, they’re projecting that the attraction will be more lucrative than the Empire State Building’s observation deck and bring in more than four million visitors during its first year. But is a giant Ferris wheel enough to revitalize an entire borough, especially the one that’s for so many years been the black sheep of NYC?

Share your opinion

Featured Story

Features, History, Staten Island

Uncovering the Past of Staten Island’s South Beach

By Dana Schulz, Mon, August 1, 2016

South Beach Staten Island, Staten Island beaches, historic Staten Island photos, historic beach photos

South Beach in 1899 © NYPL Digital Gallery

6sqft recently brought you the history of Bowery Bay Beach, once referred to as the “Coney Island of Queens.” But over on Staten Island, there was another amusement destination that rivaled its Brooklyn counterpart.

South Beach is a waterfront community on the eastern shore behind the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge. The hidden gem is currently an up-and-coming neighborhood for families, with an array of small businesses, ethnic restaurants, and quaint streets. And in the summer months, the two-mile stretch of beaches comes alive. But aside from its current livability, South Beach has a rich history. In the early 20th century, the neighborhood was full of summer bungalows thanks to a beachfront lined with amusements, theaters, arcade games, and rides. Families came from Manhattan, Sandy Hook, and elsewhere to enjoy the festive resort community and the Franklin D. Roosevelt Boardwalk, known as the “Riviera of New York City.”

Discover more of South Beach’s History

Featured Story

Features, Interviews, New Yorker Spotlight, People, Staten Island

New York is fortunate to not only have two Major League Baseball teams, but two Minor League teams—the Mets-affiliated Brooklyn Cyclones and the Yankees-affiliated Staten Island Yankees. The latter is based right near the Staten Island Ferry in St. George, and for 15 years, it’s been a team for Yankees players who are tuning up after rehab or future Major League players to get their start. Unlike the Major Leagues, the SI team has a shorter season that runs from mid-June until September, and the focus at games is all about the entertainment factor. This is where John D’Agostino comes in.

John grew up a Staten Island Yankees fan, but now serves as the team’s Director of Entertainment, where he’s responsible for making sure every game has a range of fun programming that gets fans laughing and cheering. 6sqft recently spoke with John to learn all about baseball on Staten Island and why more New Yorkers should hop on the ferry and head to a game!

Read the interview here

Green Design, New Developments, Rentals, Staten Island

URBY Staten Island

Urban farms are nothing new to NYC, but the first one at a residential building is taking shape at Staten Island‘s Urby. The $250 million, 900-unit rental development is located on the borough’s North Shore waterfront, just minutes from the ferry, and is a collaboration between Ironstate Development and Dutch architecture and design firm Concrete. There will be 35,000 square feet of retail space, and though the units are quite nice and modern, it’s the health-centric amenities that really set this LEED-certified project apart.

Urby will offer an outdoor pool, a two-story fitness center, filtered communal well, landscaped courtyards with fire pits, a rooftop apiary with beehives, a 300-car garage with electric car chargers, and access to a waterfront esplanade. In the food department, there’s one of the city’s largest urban farms, which is employing New York’s first farmer-in-residence, as well as an on-site bodega, cafe, and communal test kitchen.

Check it all out

Architecture, New Developments, Rentals, Staten Island, Urban Design

Lighthouse Point, St. George waterfront, Triangle Equities, Cooper Cary, Garrison Architects, Staten Island development

Earlier this year, after a decade of delays, Triangle Equities received $16.5 million in state subsidies for their three-acre mixed-use development on Staten Island known as Lighthouse Point. They also partnered with real estate investment fund Lubert Adler LLP to secure another large sum of private financing, before breaking ground last month. With construction underway, Yimby uncovered new renderings that show the residential, retail, and commercial components of the $200 million development. As 6sqft previously reported, “Along with the New York Wheel, Empire Outlets, and New Stapleton Waterfront, Lighthouse Point is a key element of NYCEDC’s ongoing efforts to transform the St. George waterfront into a vibrant community.”

All the renderings and details ahead

History, Staten Island, Video

In the Arthur Kill waterway, wedged between Staten Island and New Jersey, the Arthur Kill Ship Graveyard is the final home of over two dozen harbor vessels that had their best years in the city’s golden age of shipping. There were once as many as 400 of the ghostly crafts left to the wiles of entropy in the waterway, but according to Atlas Obscura, only 25 or so remain, picked over for their useful parts. Seven minutes of eerie and fascinating drone video footage offers a close-up view of the “urban marine cemetery” and the rusted metal hulls of once-useful tugboats and other harbor ships as they slowly sink into the silent, murky waters.

More about this eerie assembly and the full video

affordable housing, Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Major Developments, Staten Island

Vengoechea & Boyland, New York City Farm Colony, Staten Island farm colony, Staten Island development, Nancy Owens Studio

Rendering via Nancy Owens Studio

Over a year ago, 6sqft shared the news that Staten Island’s abandoned farm colony was set to undergo a massive rehabilitation that included a large senior housing building and a massive public park. And just yesterday, the City Council approved the New York City Economic Development Corporation’s plan to sell 45 of the site’s 96 acres to Staten Island developer Raymond Masucci for $1, according to the Times.

Mr. Masucci will pour $91 million into the project, dubbed Landmark Colony, rehabilitating five crumbling Dutch Revival-style structures, tearing down five more but saving their stones for reuse, preserving a 112-year-old dormitory “as a stabilized ruin,” constructing 344 condominiums for the 55 and older crowd, and designing 17 acres of public outdoor space.

More on the project and the history of the site

Staten Island

The Food Hall Obsession Makes Its Way to Staten Island

By Dana Schulz, Mon, December 21, 2015

Empire Outlets, MRKTPL, NYC food halls, Staten Island development

Following a slew of recent headlines–Anthony’s Bourdain’s food and retail market headed for the SuperPier, the mega-market coming to Essex Crossing that will be one of the largest in the world, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s seafood-themed food hall planned for the South Street Seaport–6sqft recently posed the question: Is the city’s food hall obsession about to burst? Though the votes were divided, the trend has shown no signs of slowing down, especially considering that it’s now making its way over to the often-forgotten borough of Staten Island, with perhaps the most gimmicky name we’ve heard yet.

Curbed reports that the team behind Gansevoort Market has partnered with Empire Outlets developers BFC Partners to open a locally curated food market by late 2017. Dubbed MRKTPL, the hall will span 15,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor space that will “tie together the history of the New York Harbor with modern communal spaces to eat and gather,” as per the press release.

More details this way

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