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History, Midtown East, New Developments, Recent Sales

249-253 East 50th Street, lutece

These three townhouses may not look like much to you, but they’ve for decades been making appearances in pop culture, from the penned to motion pictures, including The Prince of Tides, Wall Street, Crossing Delancey, and most recently, Mad Men. Located at 249-253 East 50th Street, this site once housed the world-renowned Lutèce restaurant.

Though today the structures can be described as dilapidated at best, that hasn’t stopped a group of Chinatown investors from scooping up the properties for $17 million from East 50th Development LLC. Now in new hands, what’s up next for this famed locale?

More details here

Featured Story

Features, Hell's Kitchen, Interviews, Midtown, New Yorker Spotlight, People

city knickerbocker lighting nyc , city knickerbocker lighting nyc father son, mom and pop nyc

Scott with his father

Tucked away on the second floor of a building on 11th Avenue and 48th street is City Knickerbocker, Inc., a small lighting business with a long history. Founded in 1906 founded by Adolph Liroff, a Russian immigrant whose trade was converting gasoliers and sconces to electric lamps, this business has lasted for four generations. Today, Scott Liroff, Adolph’s great-grandson, proudly carries on the family tradition serving as City Knickerbocker’s Vice President.

To appreciate Scott’s role in both his family and the business, one needs to go back over one hundred years to Brooklyn in the early 20th century. When Adolph’s Brooklyn-based business took off, he headed to the city and rented a space on 42nd Street between 8th and 9th Avenues. After the Metropolitan Opera rented his light fixtures, Broadway started calling to rent lights too. As early as 1912-1913 City Knickerbocker’s primary source of business was rentals. When Adolph’s son, Seymour, took over the business in the 1950s, the store provided lighting for shows including The Ed Sullivan Show and The Milton Berle Show.

6sqft recently spoke with Scott to learn about City Knickerbocker and what it means to carry on a legacy in New York.

Read the en-light-ening interview here

Architecture, Major Developments, Midtown, Transportation

new developments in NYC, buildings under de Blasio's plans, SL Green buildings, Buildings by Grand Central Terminal, Vanderbilt Corridor, one vanderbilt,Kohn Pederson Fox, sl green

New York City’s most taxed line is about to get a sizable cash infusion. Of the $210 million that developer SL Green Realty has budgeted for improving Grand Central’s subway station for the green light to construct a 65-story office tower next door, more than 75% will go toward the Lexington Avenue line, Crain’s reports. Yesterday, a 63-page study was delivered to Manhattan’s Community Board 5 and to transportation advocates who have called for Midtown East’s rezoning to include improvements to transportation infrastructure to meet current demand as well as the influx of nearly 16,000 workers as new lines are drawn. So where exactly will the money go?

Where will the money will go?

Celebrities, Midtown, Recent Sales

bill joel apartment 128 central park south

Piano man Billy Joel has just sold off his one-bedroom pad at 128 Central Park South for $775,000, according to public records.

The sale is the second for Joel at the building, the first being an $11 million deal he struck last year for the two-bedroom, 10,000-square-foot penthouse he once shared with ex-wife Christie Brinkley. The one-bedroom is a comparably modest pad situated on a high floor of the building. An eat-in kitchen, abundant south light and city views are some of the perks, but the listing (now offline) noted that the home needed renovation. The apartment was previously rented out, though Joel and Brinkley did entertain it as a penthouse extension. The transaction was managed by Joel’s accountants Gelfand, Rennert and Feldman. Adam Modlin of the Modlin Group brokered the deal.

See the floor plan here

Central Park South, Cool Listings, Manhattan, Midtown

Nursultan Nazarbayev, Daniyar Nazarbayev, Nursultan Nazarbayev, Daniyar Nazarbayev plaza hotel, 1 central park south, 768 fifth avenue, the plaza, plaza hotel, plaza hotel and residences

Daniyar Nazarbayev, the ultra-rich nephew of Kazakhstan President Nursultan Nazarbayev, is now leasing his equally ultra-luxurious four-bedroom at The Plaza Hotel for $55,000 a month, reports the NYDN. The beautiful 4,200 square foot home is certainly of a presidential caliber and comes dripping with the ornate features and finishes that have become so synonymous with the storied Plaza. With sunny Central Park views from every room and expansive north and west exposures, this home also hosts ceilings highlighted with mosaic stained glass and crystal chandeliers, artistically detailed moldings, a formal dining room, marble entry foyer, and much more—including a helluva lot of international drama to boot.

Inside the embroiled plaza home here

Midtown, Recent Sales

The first of what’s sure to be many flips at One57 has just netted its seller a respectable $3.45 million profit, just five months after its purchase. According to NYDN, the former owner, Investor Sso Enterprises, paid $30.55 million for the 58th-floor three-bedroom back in May, now selling it off for $34 million to hedge fund manager Harvey Sandler and his wife.

Inside the massive apartment

History, Interiors, Midtown

Gabellini Sheppard, Rainbow Room, 30 Rockefeller Plaza

The Rainbow Room served its first guests on October 3, 1934, and now, almost 80 years later to the day, the historic restaurant and event space has reopened after a restoration by Gabellini Sheppard Architects.

Located on the 65th floor of the Raymond Hood-designed 30 Rockefeller Plaza (30 Rock), it was the first restaurant located in a high-rise building and for decades was the highest restaurant in the country. Suffering from a decline in business, the fine-dining establishment closed its doors in 2009. But in 2012, the Rainbow Room was declared an official interior landmark by the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC), and a year later it was announced that the storied space would reopen this fall. Right on schedule, the new incarnation of the venue opened last night for a preview by the Sir John Soanes Museum Foundation.

Ogle the landmarked restaurant here

Featured Story

Architecture, Brooklyn, Features, Manhattan, real estate trends

phillip lehman mansion

For Manhattan’s jet-set crowd, the 2010s are starting to look an awful lot like the 1900s.

New York’s upper crust are embracing a return to the Gilded Age, moving out of their fancy penthouses, co-ops and lofts and into opulent single-family mansions. From Aby Rosen’s quest to build the largest private mansion on Park Avenue to Jared Kushner’s conversion of three former Brooklyn Law School buildings into single-family townhouses—the most affluent buyers are now on the hunt for New York’s ultimate trophy prize.

More on makeshift mansions

Midtown, New Developments, Starchitecture

Just last week, we announced that the Jean Nouvel-designed MoMA residential tower was finally moving forward, after the purchase of $85 million in air rights and with a new construction loan of $860 million. Now, The Real Deal has obtained penthouse floorplans for the 82-story tower, and they are nothing to sneeze at.

Check out the floorplans and dream about living in a Nouvel-approved penthouse

condos, Midtown, New Developments, Starchitecture

jean nouvel, 53W53, 53 West 53rd Street

Hot off the purchase of $85 million in air rights, and with a new construction loan of $860 million in tow, Hines is back on track to bring the Jean Nouvel-designed MoMA residential tower to fruition. According to TRD, Hines just closed on two deals to buy more than 240,000 square feet of development rights from MoMA and the St. Thomas Episcopal Church for $85.3 million.

more here

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