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affordable housing, Architecture, Construction Update, Long Island City, New Developments, Rentals

Watermark Court Square, Twinning Properties, LIC Development, LEED, NAS International, Principal Investors, Bank Santander, Court Square

Yesterday, 6sqft discussed how Long Island City‘s Purves Street is a hotbed of construction activity with no less than four residential towers underway along the 500-foot, one-block stretch. On a site situated between Thomson Avenue (where the pioneer condo Arris Lofts rises) and Court Square, Twining Properties has begun excavation work for a 27-story, 168-unit rental tower at 44-14 Purves Street.

According to the developer’s project page, the rental tower will be known as Watermark Court Square and is to offer “efficient apartment layouts designed for mobile professionals.” The handsome albeit unremarkable design by Handel Architects is faced with grey brick and large windows. According to Department of Buildings filings, the ground-up, 302-foot-tall tower will rise along 44th Drive, while a two-story existing building will be rehabilitated along Purves.

More details and renderings

Construction Update, Long Island City, New Developments, Rentals

Criterion Group, LIC Developments, Rabsky Group, Salamon Engineering Group, Simon Dushinsy, The Argent, 44-41 Purves Street

To say that Long Island City is undergoing a construction boom is a bit of an understatement. The city’s second most populous borough is building a business district…er high-rise bedroom community that will soon rival many American downtowns. The blocks along Jackson Avenue from the Pulaski Bridge to Queens Plaza have been sprinkled with development dust, and at the center of it all is a short dead-end street named Purves where four residential buildings are now under construction and four others have recently finished.

Near the street’s southeastern terminus, Simon Dushinsky’s Rabsky Group has topped off its 26-story, 284-unit rental tower at 44-51 Purves Street and applying the last bits of the building’s glass, metal and brick facade. In addition to a number of renderings and a new website, we’ve uncovered that the 308-foot tall building will be called ‘Halo LIC,” which we learned is an adjective for something silvery, or an archaic word for money (how fitting). The site was previously planned to give rise to a pair of shorter towers by the Criterion Group but the 28,000 square-foot lot was flipped in 2013 for $32 million.

find out more here

Long Island City, Major Developments, New Developments, Rentals, Starchitecture

Paragon Paint Factory, Simon Barron, Simon Development, LIC rentals, Long island city construction

Here’s our first peek at Simon Baron Development, Quadrum Global and CRE Development’s three-tower Long Island City development slated to rise alongside the former Paragon Paint factory building at 45-40 Vernon Boulevard. Permits for the first tower were filed with the DOB back in June and detail a 28-story, 296-unit rental tower designed by SHoP Architects. The tower is part of a larger master plan that will revamp the eastern extents of the Anable Basin inlet with a waterfront esplanade and bring an additional 14-story residential tower at 45-24 Vernon Boulevard and an eight story building along 45th Road.

As per the renderings provided by SHoP, the design of the two lower towers is consistent with many of the firm’s recent New York City projects and feature copper-clad, orderly bases yielding to playful facades of angled projecting windows. The central tower partially rises from within the rear section of the Paragon Paint factory building and its form will be a sheer 300-foot glass prism creased along each elevation to better capture sweeping views of the East River and Manhattan skyline.

More details ahead

Architecture, condos, Long Island City, New Developments

45-35 11th Street, GDC Development, Newman Design Architects, LIC, Murray Park 4

After the record snatch-up of Red Hook’s King and Sullivan Townhomes last month, another not-so-Brownstoney neighborhood is joining in on the townhouse craze. Westchester County-based GDC Properties is slated to bring eighteen two-family townhouses to Long Island City, and here we have a first look at what the ensemble’s 11th Street frontage will look like.

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Architecture, Long Island City, New Developments, Rentals

37-10 Crescent Street, Long Island City development, Fogarty Finger, NYC micro housing, Ranger Properties

To date, the city’s biggest and most news-worthy micro housing complex, My Micro NY, has offered only studios, which makes sense considering a micro apartment is typically defined as encompassing less than 350 square feet. But the term “micro” is getting an expansion (figuratively and literally) in Long Island City, where a new rental complex will offer 57 two- and three-bedroom units ranging from 490 to 735 square feet, according to the Wall Street Journal. The project at 37-10 Crescent Street is being developed by Ranger Properties, whose managing principal Sheldon Stein said, “Our concept is we can offer really high-quality public amenity space, and better value with smaller private spaces, and bring the rental cost down.”

More details

Architecture, Long Island City, New Developments

PMG, Property Markets Group, Kevin Maloney, One Court Square, LIC, Long Island City, Queens Plaza Park, 29-37 41st Avenue

Here’s a closer look at Property Markets Group and the Hakim Organization’s upcoming Long Island City skyscraper dubbed Queens Plaza Park. Slated to soar 70 stories-plus into Queens Plaza’s burgeoning skyline, the 915-foot tall building will contain a whopping 800 units, and will be, by far, the largest and tallest residential building outside of Manhattan.

Positioned at the forefront of transit-accessible Queens Plaza, the project will encircle and incorporate the 88-year old Manhattan Bank Building (affectionately dubbed “the clock tower”). The joint-venture acquired the building for $31 million last November, which itself was once the tallest building on Long Island, and is now calendared to be designated an official city landmark.

more info on the project here

Architecture, Art, Events, Green Design

Office for Political Innovation, MoMA PS1, Andrés Jaque, MoMA Young Architects Program

Photo © Miguel de Guzman

“COSMO” has officially brought the party to MoMA PS1.

The winning project of MoMA PS1’s 16th Young Architects Program (YAP) is now open for public viewing in the museum affiliate’s courtyard. “COSMO: Give me a pipe and I will move/celebrate the Earth,” which was designed by Andrés Jaque/Office for Political Innovation, is a moveable artifact made from customized irrigation components that puts out an effort to make visible–and enjoyable–the hidden urbanism of the water pipes we live by. We stopped by the courtyard earlier today as “COSMO” got its finishing touches, and we must say, this installation looks as incredible as its renderings.

Your first look here

Art, Long Island City, Policy

5POINTZ, 5POINTZ mecca, 5POINTZ long island city

Photo via Garrett Ziegler/Flickr

It’s been 19 months since the 5Pointz graffiti mecca was secretly whitewashed overnight by the developers who have since razed the site to make way for the two residential towers that will replace it. Then, to pour salt in the wound, this past November G&M Realty announced that they planned to use the iconic 5Pointz name for their new project, infuriating the artists whose work adorned the building and leading them to launch a petition to stop the title.

Now, the plot has thickened. Nine graffiti artists filed a lawsuit on Friday “seeking unspecified damages from the owner who whitewashed away their artwork,” reports the Daily News. The plaintiffs claim they’re owed financial compensation as they were not given the opportunity to retrieve their work, much of which could have ended up in museums or the artists’ personal collections. The lost collection amounts to more than 350 graffiti pieces.

More details here

Architecture, condos, Long Island City, New Developments

Hunter's Point, LIC construction, LIC developments, Murray Park, Centrury Development, Queens condos

While Manhattan buyers typically pay a great premium for a park-front address, a single subway stop away in Long Island City, a new condominium aptly named [email protected] Murray Park North will begin sales with homes starting around $400,000. Developed by George Xu and Century Development Group, the six-story, 39-unit building will house a mix of studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments designed by Queens’ own Raymond Chan Architects.

[email protected] Murray Park North is located at 11-35 45th Avenue along the northern frontage of the 2.5 acre Murray Park/Murray Playground. Similar in size to downtown’s Gramercy Park, the community jewel is LIC’s largest green space not situated along the East River. The park is also across from the neighborhood’s sole historic district and is positioned centrally between the area’s two booming high-rise nodes–the master-planned Hunter’s Point waterfront community and the Court Square-Queens Plaza business district.

More on the project ahead

Featured Story

Events, Features, Interviews, New Yorker Spotlight, People

Native New Yorker Gil Shapiro founded Urban Archaeology in the early 1970s, when the salvaging movement was just catching on. With a collector’s–and creator’s–eye and an entrepreneurial spirit, he began re-imagining architectural remnants as treasured additions to the home environment. This month the company has been preparing for an auction taking place on March 27th and 28th, handled by Guernsey’s auction house, when nearly 1,000 of their long-treasured pieces of history will be sold to prepare for a move to a new location.

First opened in Soho in 1978, the store’s early customers–including Andy Warhol and other denizens of what was undisputedly the epicenter of the art world–adored the unique and time-treasured aspects of Shapiro’s restored architectural salvage pieces, yet they would always find ways they wished they could customize their favorite items. Finding that he excelled at bringing a fresh perspective to pieces of historical and architectural importance, he started reproducing individual pieces as well as creating new lines of bath fixtures and lighting, many of which originated in places like the Plaza Hotel, New York’s Yale Club and the St. Regis Hotel.

Read our interview with Gil here

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