Blog Archives →

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

Ann Dexter-Jones, British-born socialite, jewelry designer, mom to the Ronson clan, and once-again wife of Foreigner’s Mick Jones (the pair married 32 years ago, divorced in 2007 and recently remarried) just put her chic three-bedroom Village co-op on the market (h/t New York Post). The 2,075-square-foot home at 42 West 9th Street in the coveted “Gold Coast” neighborhood off lower Fifth Avenue, asking $4.995 million, has a townhouse vibe and plenty of character. Four wood-burning fireplaces, 11-foot ceilings, and pre-war details can be found throughout, in a building with more amenities than a townhouse.

Take the tour

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History

Uncovering the sites of the South Village’s secret ‘Little Italy’

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, October 5, 2017

Caffe Reggio, via Prayitno/Flickr

Many think of Little Italy’s Mulberry Street or the Bronx’s Arthur Avenue as the centers of Italian-American life and culture in New York. But some of the most historically significant sites relating to the Italian-American experience in New York can be found in the Greenwich Village blocks known as the South Village–from the first church in America built specifically for an Italian-American congregation to the cafe where cappuccino was first introduced to the country, to the birthplace of Fiorello LaGuardia, NYC’s first Italian-American mayor.

All the historic sites right this way

Celebrities, Greenwich Village, Recent Sales

Devonshire House via CityRealty; Alec Baldwin via Gage Skidmore/Flickr

It’s like musical chairs for Alec Baldwin and his apartments at the Devonshire House. He bought the Greenwich Village building’s penthouse for $11.7 million in October 2011; in June 2012, his wife Hilaria bought the unit next door in her name; and the following year, they scooped up an eighth-floor unit for $2.25 million. Two years ago, however, Baldwin sold this last apartment at a loss for $2.1 million, and this past May, he also unloaded the Eldorado apartment he shared in the ’90s with ex-wife Kim Bassinger, both transactions leading many to believe the Emmy-winning Trump portrayer would be departing NYC. But Mansion Global now reports that he’s bought another Devonshire unit for $1.3 million. It’s on the same floor as his other two units, so it’s likely that he’ll combine the three into one massive spread.

Read more

Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

The kitchen may be in the cellar, but this 2,400-square-foot townhouse at 154 West 11th Street in the lovely western reaches of Greenwich Village keeps every inch of interior space clean, bright and airy. At 20 feet wide with three (legit) floors, it’s understandable why so much thought was put into making sure space was used wisely. Built in 1845 and surrounded by its historic brethren in the Greenwich Village Historic District, the three-bedroom home has been lovingly restored and made ready for modern family life from to its walnut-stained oak floors and four wood-burning fireplaces to its charming garden.

Explore every floor

Featured Story

Events, Features, Giveaways, Greenwich Village

Animation © WooJin Chung for 6sqft

Now in its 15th year, Taste of the Village returns next month with a delicious fundraiser for Washington Square Park. Hosted by the Washington Square Park Conservancy, more than 30 local purveyors will set up under the historic Arch, offering samples of their tasty food and drinks accompanied by performances by Park musicians. This year’s roster includes longtime favorites like Murray’s Cheese, The Spotted Pig, and Otto, along with much-talked-about newcomers including Nix, Loring Place, and Seabird.

6sqft has partnered with the Conservancy to offer two lucky readers the chance to win a pair of VIP tickets–which is worth $250 and provides one-hour early access to the event, taking place on September 19th from 5:30-8:00pm.


1. Tag your friend in this Facebook post or any upcoming event posts
2. Tag your friend in this Instagram post or any upcoming event posts

On Monday, September 11th we’ll randomly pick one winner from our Facebook page and one from Instagram, each of whom will receive a set of two tickets.

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, History

How LGBT activism led to NYC’s most notorious bank robbery: The real story behind ‘Dog Day Afternoon’

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, August 24, 2017

Dog Day Afternoon

The most notorious bank robbery in New York City history took place on August 22, 1972, during the decidedly dog days of that long hot summer. Immortalized in the film “Dog Day Afternoon,” it was an unlikely anti-hero tale with a backstory that began in Greenwich Village, interwoven with the social and political currents running through the city at the time, most notably the growing LGBT movement that had taken hold after the Stonewall Riots.

Get the whole surprising history this way

Cool Listings, Greenwich Village, Interiors

34 west 9th street, greenwich village, douglas elliman

Just imagine enjoying the dwindling days of summer from this spacious wood patio lined with greenery. The outdoor space is tacked onto a 25-foot-wide Greenwich Village townhouse, at 34 West 9th Street, and your view is of the peaceful backyard gardens. Walk out the front door, though, and you’re in the bustle of the Village. As for the apartment, it’s still got some of the townhome’s original architectural details, including two decorative fireplaces. For the one-bedroom pad, with a bonus, window-less second bedroom, it’ll cost $6,750 a month.

Go inside the unit

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, History

A 15-year-old Greenwich Village student inspired the hit song ‘Summer in the City’

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, August 17, 2017

Image via Wiki Commons

Everyone knows the folk-rock classic “Summer in the City” by the Lovin’ Spoonful, which topped the charts 51 years ago this August in 1966. But fewer know the song’s roots in Greenwich Village–lead singer John Sebastian actually grew up in the neighborhood and the act got their start in the local clubs–and fewer still know a 15-year-old Village student was responsible for a significant part of its composition.

Get the whole story

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, History, Landmarks Preservation Commission

The Village’s Twin Peaks: From a quirky ‘Swiss-chalet’ to a landmarks controversy

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, August 10, 2017

102 Bedford Street in 2015 (left) via Wiki Commons, and as of today, via GVSHP

Few buildings capture the whimsy, flamboyance, and bohemian spirit of early 20th century Greenwich Village as does the building known as “Twin Peaks” at 102 Bedford Street. Described as a “wonderfully ludicrous mock half-timbered fantasy row-house castle” by architecture critic Paul Goldberger, the present incarnation of the building was born in 1925 as a radical remodeling of an 1830 rowhouse into a five-story artists’ studio apartment building. In the mid 20th-century, the building became even more iconic with a cream and brown paint job that mimicked its Alpine cottage inspiration. However, a more recent paint job stripped away this history, resulting in a controversial landmarks battle.

The whole story

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History, West Village 

‘Heard it through the grapevine?’ The source was probably at 6th Avenue and 11th Street

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, August 3, 2017

6th Avenue and 11th Street, 1905. Image via Ephemeral New York,

On August 6, 1966, the first known recording of “I Heard It Through The Grapevine” was made by the Miracles. Written by Motown pioneers Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong, the song was re-recorded several times, most famously by Gladys Night and the Pips and Marvin Gaye, whose version landed on the top of the charts for seven weeks in early 1969.

But the famous saying about receiving important news or information through a person-to-person chain of communication significantly pre-dates the Motown era. In fact, plentiful evidence and credible sources say it all goes back to a beloved tavern on the corner of 6th Avenue and 11th Street in Greenwich Village.

more on the history here


Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.