Blog Archives →

City Living, East Village

Trader Joe's

Via Wiki Commons

It’s been over two-and-a-half years since Trader Joe’s announced its plans to open a new store in a 23,000-square-foot space at 432 East 14th Street across from Stuyvesant Town, just three avenues east of their original 14th Street store. The beloved grocery store is the retail anchor tenant in the newly-constructed residential building called EVE that replaced the former Stuyvesant Post Office at that address. With leasing at the building a year in and an affordable housing lottery open, Trader Joe’s now confirms on its website that the store will open on Monday, January 6th at 8am (h/t EV Grieve).

14th Street, street of groceries

Featured Story

East Village, Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History, Noho

14 historic sites of the abolitionist movement in Greenwich Village

By Andrew Berman of Village Preservation, Thu, December 19, 2019

As this year marks 400 years since the first African slaves were brought to America, much attention has been paid to what that means and how to remember this solemn anniversary. The city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission issued a story map highlighting landmarks of the abolitionist movement in New York City. Absent from the map were a number of incredibly important sites in Greenwich Village, the East Village, and Noho, which were a hotbed of abolitionist activity through the 19th century, as well as the home of the city’s largest African American community. Ahead, learn about 14 significant sites of the anti-slavery movement.

Learn more

Cool Listings, East Village

87 St. marks place, east village, cool listings, co-ops

Photo credit: VHT courtesy of Compass

Though St. Mark’s Place in the East Village may not be the colorful alt-culture adventure it once was, it’s still central to a neighborhood that never stops moving. This compact co-op studio at 87 St. Mark’s Place is in the center of it all, yet it’s buttoned up, fitted out, and ready for the next adventurer to enjoy. Attributes like a working fireplace and a built-in Murphy bed make the space feel like home.

More cute studio, this way

Featured Story

Features, holidays

The 8 best neighborhoods in NYC for holiday shopping

By Rebecca Fishbein, Tue, November 26, 2019

Photo by Josh Wilburne on Unsplash

New York is a prime spot for holiday shopping, in large part because of big department stores like Bloomingdale’s and Macy’s, designer flagships that line the Upper East Side, and whatever hell awaits you in the Disney Store in Times Square. But true New Yorkers should avoid the major shopping hubs, and instead seek gifts and other goods in some of the city’s slightly less crowded and infinitely more interesting ‘hoods, including the many holiday markets and pop-up shops found across the five boroughs. Find our favorite neighborhoods for holiday shopping this season, ahead.

See the full list

affordable housing, East Village, housing lotteries

Street View of 433 East 13th Street in June 2019; Map Data © 2019 Google

It’s your chance to snag an affordable apartment in a prime section of the East Village. A lottery launched this week for 30 mixed-income units at a newly constructed building called EVE NYC, located at 433 East 13th Street between 1st Avenue and Avenue A. Not only is the building within walking distance of an abundance of restaurants and bars, but it also offers one of the best perks inside of it: a Trader Joe’s will open on the ground floor of its 14th Street side. Qualifying New Yorkers earning 40, 60, and 130 percent of the area median income can apply for the units, which range from $674/month studios to $2,991/month two-bedrooms.

Do you qualify?

Cool Listings, East Village

322 East 14th street, cool listings, east village

Image credit: VHT courtesy of The Corcoran Group.

This renovated one-bedroom co-op at 322 East 14th Street makes the best of a compact space with ceilings over 10 feet, well-designed details, and splashes of color. Asking $640,000, it’s in the heart of it all in the East Village near Union Square, Nomad, and endless transportation options.

Take a look

Featured Story

Features, GVSHP, History, Union Square

Photo by Beyond My Ken / Wiki Commons

The area south of Union Square, on the border between Greenwich Village and the East Village, is changing. The approval of the new 14th Street Tech Hub south of Union Square combined with an explosion of tech-related development in the area has resulted in the demolition of mid-19th-century hotels and Beaux-Arts style tenements, with new office towers like 809 Broadway taking their place.

Aside from being rich in 19th- and early-20th-century architecture, this area is overflowing with history connected to many of the great American artists, writers, musicians, publishers, activists, innovators and artisans of the last century and a half. As part of Village Preservation’s work to document and bring to light some of that often forgotten history, we wrote this piece last year exploring the connections to Mark Twain and Walt Whitman, Alexander Graham Bell and Leroi Jones (among many others). Now, we’ve uncovered even more history-making people and events connected to this area and its buildings, from Hammacher Schlemmer (NYC’s first hardware store) to a slew of influential publishing houses (including that which published the first U.S. edition of “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”) to the Women’s Suffrage League headquarters.

Read more

Featured Story

East Village, Features, History

12 historic Italian-American sites of the East Village

By Andrew Berman of Village Preservation, Thu, October 3, 2019

October, the month we mark Columbus Day, is also Italian-American Heritage and Culture Month. That combined with the recent celebrations around the 125th anniversary of beloved pastry shop Veniero’s inspires a closer look at the East Village’s own historic Little Italy, centered around First Avenue near the beloved pastry shop and cafe. While not nearly as famous or intact as similar districts around Mulberry Street or Bleecker and Carmine Street in the South Village, if you look closely vestiges of the East Village’s once-thriving Italian community are all around.

In the second half of the 19th century, the East Village was a vibrant checkerboard of ethnic enclaves. Germans were by far the dominant group, until the turn of the century when Eastern European Jews took over the Second Avenue spine and much of what’s now Alphabet City, Hungarians congregated along Houston Street, and Slavs and Poles gravitated towards the blocks just west and north of Tompkins Square. But a linear Italian-American enclave formed along and near First Avenue, broadening at 14th Street. Vestiges of this community survived into the third quarter of the 20th century, with just a few establishments and structures connected to that era continuing to function today.

Get the full list

East Village, Events

Photo by James and Karla Murray exclusively for 6sqft

A longtime Italian pastry shop is celebrating its 125th anniversary this month and celebrating in the best way possible: free cannolis. Family-owned and operated since 1894, Veniero’s has grown from a small immigrant-owned candy shop in the East Village to a New York City institution, selling more than 150 desserts today. On Monday, Sept. 23, the bakery will offer free mini cannolis (while supplies last), live music, and a discount of 18.94 percent on all orders, according to Time Out.

Get the delicious details

Featured Story

East Village, Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History, Lower East Side

Uncovering the stories behind downtown’s overlooked synagogues

By Andrew Berman of Village Preservation, Thu, August 8, 2019

On August 8, 2008, Village Preservation and the East Village Community Coalition (EVCC) submitted a request to the LPC to landmark a little-known but remarkable survivor– Congregation Mezritch Synagogue at 515 East 6th Street between 1st Avenue and Avenue A.  The building was the last operating “tenement synagogue” in the East Village. A young, little-known developer named Jared Kushner was planning to tear it down and replace it with condos and a new space for the tiny congregation, which had operated out of the building since 1910.

The story has a (relatively) happy ending – the synagogue and much of its surroundings were landmarked in 2012, and the demolition plan was dropped. But unlike the deservedly beloved and celebrated Eldridge Street Synagogue, now a National Historic Landmark, Mezritch is one of several unique but in many cases overlooked historic synagogues still standing in and around Greenwich Village, the East Village, and the Lower East Side, which in the early 20th century contained what was by many accounts the largest Jewish community in the world. Ahead, we take a look at the history of seven of them and what makes them so unique.

Learn about the history

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.