Search Result for hamptons

Photo: Gavin Zeigler for Sotheby’s International Realty

In 1998, the same year she began her breakout role in Sex and the City, actress Kim Cattrall bought this East Hampton home for just $450,000, according to the New York Times, who first reported that it’s now been listed for $3,250,000. The shingled home is a lovely mix of casual beach house and contemporary design, and the property also has a detached studio. “I thought about selling the property after my divorce in 2004,” Cattrall told the Times, “but I just couldn’t — 22 years later, it’s time.”

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79th street boat basin, upper west side, houseboats

Photo of the 79th Street Boat Basin by Jim Henderson on Wikimedia

In Amsterdam, houseboats are considered an affordable way to live in the center of the city. They’re also popular in other global cities, from London’s Little Venice to waterfront neighborhoods in Vancouver, Los Angeles, and Sydney. So why doesn’t New York City—with its 578 miles of coastline—have a thriving houseboat community, too? While it’s impossible to know for certain, recent estimates for Manhattan suggest that year-round houseboat residents or “liveaboards” may now number fewer than 50.

More on houseboat living and how to do it yourself

Photo credit: Compass

Editor’s Note: At the time of publication, a contract was signed for the home.

Pritzker Prize-winning Japanese architect Shigeru Ban is known for his use of unconventional materials such as paper and corrugated plastic, as well as his humanitarian efforts. He’s also known for his clean, modernist lines, which are fully on display at this Sagaponack home that he designed, the only work he’s ever completed on Long Island. The six-bedroom, 8,000-square-foot residence also boasts Ban’s signature melding of indoor/outdoor spaces with a gorgeous pool and outdoor patio serving as a courtyard for the home.

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$10M Montauk home has a rooftop pool overlooking the ocean

By Dana Schulz, Fri, September 11, 2020

Photos courtesy of Compass

With views like this, why wouldn’t you put the pool on the roof? Set on a full acre on a high bluff on the shores of Montauk, this three-level contemporary home is party-ready inside and out. Asking $9,995,000, the house has 6,000 square feet of interior space, five bedrooms, and 4,000 square feet of outdoor space including the rooftop and another level of outdoor lounges.

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Listing photos courtesy of The Corcoran Group

The Amagansett Dunes is a seaside stretch of this Hamptons enclave that is full of beach cottages and casual vacation homes. And though this property at 9 Ocean Lane fits both those bills, it’s really quite unique. Designed by Bates Masi + Architects, the home is only 600 square feet due to local and FEMA regulations. However, the architects used these restraints to “explore the geometry of the building in section and how it can expand our perception of space,” according to their project page. The award-winning two-bedroom residence is now for sale $1,725,000 and it even comes fully furnished.

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Listing photos courtesy of Houlihan Lawrence

Known as the Edersheim Residence, this Westchester home was built in 1958, but in the 1980s, owners Maurits and Claire Edersheim asked famed architect Paul Rudolph (who had renovated their Manhattan apartment in 1970) to completely revamp the residence. Rudolph added a new front facade, a trademark sunken living room, skylights, a guest house, indoor and outdoor pools, a covered porch, and much more. According to Galerie, the most recent owners retained all of Rudolph’s modernist details but worked with the Paul Rudolph Foundation on a modernization that made the home nearly net-zero. They’ve now listed the stunner for $5.6 million.

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Photos by Allyson Lubow, courtesy of The Corcoran Group

Beach houses aren’t reserved for the Jersey Shore and the Hamptons. At Rockaway Point in Queens, this shorefront home is airy, family-friendly, and just steps from the beach. Plus, there are two outdoor decks and additional outdoor space. The four-bedroom home is just four years old and is asking $1,099,000.

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Photos by Ryan Fitzpatrick for Daniel Gale Sotheby’s International Realty

Sometimes the best things in life are the simplest things. And though this Long Island house isn’t exactly simple (it does have eight bedrooms, sit on three acres, and have a huge pool and a guest cottage), its traditional style and classical interiors make it a true standout. Located in Locust Valley, a quaint town that’s part of Oyster Bay, and asking $4.5 million, the colonial home was built in 1863 but underwent a modern renovation that’s brought it into the 21st century.

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Designed by Calvin Tsao and Zack McKown of renowned contemporary firm Tsao & McKown Architects, this residence is one of the original Houses at Sagaponac, a modernist development conceived in the early 2000s by developer Harry “Coco” Brown and architect Richard Meier. The original plan was for 32 homes to be built by different prominent architects, but after Brown’s death and the recession, only eight were completed, making them even more special. This five-bedroom home utilizes moveable glass walls and oversized windows to take in views of the surrounding greenery and incredible 60-foot pool and sun deck.

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Listing photos courtesy of Compass

This over-the-top Mediterranean-style mansion on Long Island just sold for $9,225,000, making it the most expensive home sold this year in Nassau County, as well as the most expensive home sold in Sands Points since 2016 and the fourth-highest sale in the North Shore over the last five years. Sales records aside, the home’s opulence speaks for itself. At a whopping 20,000 square feet, the waterfront estate has an indoor pool, movie theater (complete with a ticket booth and stage curtains!), a personal arcade (with skee ball and pinball machines), and tons of marble.

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Archtober2020