Search Result for co-living

Common, Common Robinson, Striver's Row, 267 West 139th Street, Harlem, coliving

Photos by Seth Caplan for Common

Co-living startup Common has opened its third Harlem location in the St. Nicholas Historic District, better known as Strivers’ Row for the long list of African American luminaries who lived along the two-block stretch. Common brings its modern approach to the area, with a handful of private bedrooms now available at 267 West 139th Street from $1,600 to $2,200 a month.

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27-28 Thomson Avenue, Arris Lofts, Long Island City, LIC, cool listings, lofts

Photo credit: Al Seidman courtesy of Compass

The lofts at the former Eagle Electric Manufacturing Factory at 27-28 Thomson Avenue in Long Island City, built in 1920, are uncompromisingly authentic, while the full-service Arris Lofts condo conversion benefits from the kind of impressive amenities for which the Queens neighborhood is known. Occupying 1,725 square feet of flexible living space with a bedroom, a home office, and two full baths, this generously-sized residence is quiet and sunny, configured with modern living in mind. It’s asking $1.49 million.

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Renderings by Scuares, courtesy of The Collective

The Collective is wrapping up a busy year with news of its latest co-living development at 292 North 8th Street in Williamsburg. Stonehill Taylor will design a 100,000-square-foot building comprised of 224 studios. Ninety-seven of those are to be set aside for students, and the remaining 127 rooms will be geared toward nightly and monthly stays. The North 8th Street location is one of three now underway in Brooklyn. A forthcoming flagship location is in the works at 555 Broadway in South Williamsburg, and a Sou Fujimoto-designed building will soon take shape at the site of the former Slave Theater in Bed-Stuy. All three Brooklyn locations are set to open in 2022.

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The Collective, Paper Factory, Long Island City, Co-living

Images courtesy of The Collective

London-based co-living company The Collective has opened its first U.S. location at the former Paper Factory Hotel in Long Island City. Designed in collaboration with Palette Architecture, the 125-room location will focus on a “short stay” model ranging from one-night to 29-day stays. Members will have access to communal living areas and wellness services, as well as a soon-to-launch restaurant and cultural programming. The company already has plans to expand on today’s opening by adding 100 additional rooms on top of the existing building by 2021. 

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wework, wegrow, bjarke ingels, chelsea

Photo by Laurian Ghinitoiu courtesy of WeWork

Following a failed IPO and an impending takeover by Japanese parent company SoftBank amid an exodus of investors, office space sublease and coworking brand leader WeWork informed parents that the 2019-2020 school year would be the last for the newly-launched Manhattan elementary school, HuffPost reports. Rebekah Neumann, the co-founder of the company and wife of its recently-ousted CEO, Adam Neumann (and first cousin of Gwyneth Paltrow), had helmed the educational program for children ages three to nine, titled WeGrow, with a focus on education through play and interaction. The small New York City private school opened in 2018 with a tuition bill of between $22,000 and $42,000 a year. On the curriculum were yoga, dance and martial arts and weekly trips to an upstate farm to learn how to plant and harvest crops–in addition to fundamental courses, all with a heavy emphasis on creative expression and immersion in nature.

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Rendering courtesy of Common and L+M Development Partners

A year ago, the city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development announced plans for an affordable co-living pilot program. Known as ShareNYC, the initiative “lets developers seek public financing in exchange for creating affordable, shared-housing developments,” as 6sqft previously reported. The city has now selected three proposals that will create or preserve accommodations for roughly 300 residents. Two of the projects, including one by co-living giant Common, will be located in East Harlem, while the third will be in East New York.

Learn about all the projects

Renderings courtesy of The Collective and Artefactorylab

Days after filing building permits for 1215 Fulton Street in Bed-Stuy—the site of the former Slave Theatre—London-based co-living startup The Collective has announced it will be partnering with renowned Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto on the design, his first in New York. The 10-story structure will span over 240,000 square feet and be comprised of three buildings connected by an expansive “ground-floor hub” designed to feel like “an extension of the street.” The project aims to create “a new idea of how a community can come together in a building,” as the architects explained in a design statement.

Take a first look at the renderings

View of the Slave Theater in 2012. Map data ©2012 Google.

London-based communal living company The Collective filed a building permit application last week for a planned development on the site of the former Slave Theater in Bed-Stuy, which the company bought earlier this year for $32.5 million. As Brownstoner first reported, the application is for a 10-story, roughly 161,000-square-foot structure that will comprise residential units, a hotel, and community space. Ismael Leyva Architects will lead the project, which is expected to include 136 apartments, 222 hotel rooms, underground parking, a restaurant, a public courtyard, spa lounges, and other amenities. The finished building is expected to open in 2022.

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New bill may bring hostels back to New York City

By Michelle Cohen, Tue, August 13, 2019

NYC tourists, tourism

Image via CC.

New York City could make hostels legal under a bill, set to be introduced this week in the City Council, that would permit the super-budget accommodations to operate again after a state law made them illegal, the Wall Street Journal reports. The bill would provide hostels with their own separate department and classification under city law. The city’s hostels all but disappeared after a 2010 law covering multiple dwellings took aim at short-term rentals.

Will hostels thrive in the Airbnb era?

Big ideas for small lots, architecture, AIA, HPD, affordable housing

“More with Less,” a winning entry by Palette Architecture

The New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) and the American Institute of Architects New York (AIANY) announced on Tuesday the selection of five New York City-based firms as finalists in the Big Ideas for Small Lots NYC design competition for small-scale, urban infill housing. As 6sqft previously reported, the program was organized by HPD and AIANY as a way to address the challenges associated with the design and construction of affordable housing on 23 lots of underutilized city-owned land. First announced by the city last year, the program falls under Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Housing New York 2.0 plan. The winning proposals were selected by a panel of nine jurors and evaluated on their design, replicability, and construction feasibility. The finalists will advance to the final stage of the program.

See more of the finalists’ designs

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