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Photo via the Library of Congress

Before Thanksgiving became a holiday known for stuffing down food with the people you love, it looked a whole lot like Halloween. That is thanks to the Thanksgiving “ragamuffins,” children who dressed up in costume and wandered the streets in search of swag, asking passerby and shop owners, “Anything for Thanksgiving?” The practice could be found everywhere from Missouri to Los Angeles, but it was a particularly strong tradition in New York City.

“Thanksgiving masquerading has never been more universal,” said a New York Times report from 1899. “Fantastically garbed youngsters and their elders were on every corner of the city. Not a few of the maskers and mummers wore disguises that were recognized as typifying a well-known character or myth. There were Fausts, Uncle Sams, Harlequins, bandits, sailors. All had a great time. The good-humored crowd abroad was generous with pennies and nickels, and the candy stores did a land-office business.”

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Photo credit: Eitan Gamlieli for Sotheby’s International Realty

On the outside, the tidy black-shuttered single-family townhouse at 248 East 68th Street in Lenox Hill is one in a cheerful historic row, built in 1881 by a developer who sought charm instead of monotony. The home is being sold for $6.5 million by the estate of the late Broadway producer Isobel Robins Konecky and her husband, entertainment attorney Ronald Konecky. The couple lived in the house since the 1970s, renovated it in 2006, and created a home with every modern comfort. In doing so they added even more charm to the four-story, four-bedroom home, where they hosted family, friends, and clients, including Walter Cronkite, Roone Arledge, Barbara Walters, and Frank Gifford.

Take the townhouse tour

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The lead female runners at 81st Street and 1st Avenue in 2015, photo © 6sqft

The world’s largest marathon takes place this Sunday, returning to the five boroughs after a pandemic hiatus last year. On November 7, the 50th New York City Marathon will look slightly different this year, bringing together roughly 33,000 runners, which is about 20,000 fewer participants than usual because of Covid-19. The marathon wasn’t always the largest in the world, however. Started by the New York Road Runners Club in 1970, the race began as a few loops around Central Park with just over 100 runners. But the passion of its founders, coupled with the spirit of the city, grew the marathon into a monumental event. In honor of the upcoming 2021 Marathon, 6sqft is taking a look back at the history of the race, its greatest moments, and what’s in store for this year.

All that right this way

All photos by Evan Joseph

A recently renovated brownstone located on a park block with eight bedrooms, four baths, and private outdoor space? This home checks all of the boxes. Asking $7.49 million, the townhouse at 541 1st Street in Park Slope was professionally designed and furnished, with attention paid to not only preserving historic details but also complementing them with modern upgrades. In addition to the designer-curated interiors, the home boasts a charming rear garden and a parlor-level deck.

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Listing photos courtesy of The Corcoran Group

This lovely Park Slope co-op is certainly handsome, but it avoids being overly austere and maintains its delicate, pre-war lightness. Located in a brownstone at 135 Garfield Place, the one-bedroom home is filled with wood details old and new, including an original fireplace mantel, pocket shutters, and moldings, as well as new built-in cherry bookshelves. It’s asking $750,000 with monthly maintenance of $443.

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The 7 best places to see fall foliage outside NYC

By Rebecca Fishbein, Fri, October 1, 2021

A downside to living in a thriving city is that air pollution makes for poor fall foliage, though some spots in town—Wave Hill, Pelham Bay Park—still boast colorful leaves at the end of October. But if you take a short trip outside the city limits, you can see some beautiful autumn colors, all within a day’s drive. Ahead, we’ve rounded up our seven favorites, from Mohonk Mountain House to Bear Mountain to the Storm King Art Center.

Check out all the spots

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The 10 best apple and pumpkin picking spots near NYC

By Rebecca Fishbein, Thu, September 30, 2021

Photo via Pixabay

With autumn in New York City quickly approaching, you can take in the changing leaves and crisp air, and there are few places better to do that than a local farm. Some of the best spots near town offer apple and pumpkin picking, in addition to a slew of other fall-ready activities, making it easy to bring some of the season home with you. Ahead, we’ve rounded up our 10 favorite spots to check out this year.

Check ’em out!

88 remsen street, brooklyn heights, most expensive, townhouses, cool listings

Listing photos courtesy of Brown Harris Stevens

When it listed in 2019 for $18 million, this Brooklyn Heights townhouse at 88 Remsen Street was the borough’s most expensive home. The record has since been shattered, but the townhouse is now trying again for $20 million. The price may be steep, but this property consists of the main house that includes a garden-level rental, as well as a rear carriage house that serves as a rec room, garage, and a second possible rental unit. All the spaces are beautiful in their own unique way and the neighborhood can’t be beaten.

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Photo of Little Island by Michael Grimm Photography, Photo of Freshkills Park courtesy of Rebecka Gordon, Photo of the Brooklyn Central Library by the Center for Architecture, and Photo of the Brooklyn Bridge by Ling Tang on Unsplash

A monthlong celebration of architecture and design returns to New York City next month with a mix of virtual and in-person events. Now in its 11th year, the Center for Architecture’s Archtober includes a host of events, exhibitions, and expert-led tours and talks, all of which provide a behind-the-scenes look at the buildings, cultural institutions, and public space that make New York, New York. For the second year in a row because of the coronavirus, the festival will feature a combination of in-person and virtual programming, allowing more people than ever to participate. Ahead, find just some of our favorite events happening for the festival, which runs through the month of October.

Details this way

Featured Story

Next Saturday marks the 20th anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks. Whether New Yorkers were here two decades ago or not, it will be a somber day across the city and across the world. For those looking for ways to honor the anniversary, we have put together a preliminary list of commemorations and events, whether you prefer to mark the date from home or in a group of your fellow New Yorkers. The list includes the annual Tribute in Light and reading of the names, as well as indoor and outdoor concerts, documentary film screenings, and more.

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