Search Result for adirondack

Cabin interiors; Photo courtesy of Hutton Brickyards

For years, New Yorkers have been drawn to the Hudson Valley city of Kingston for its rich history, arts and culture, and proximity to nature, ideal for both a weekend getaway and year-round residence. A new hotel just north of New York City is set to open this spring that will offer 31 individual cabins across 73 acres of lush landscape, providing a coronavirus-safe escape for city dwellers. Located on the site of a former brick factory, Hutton Brickyards has been transformed from a manufacturing property into a laid-back but luxurious riverfront resort with private cabins, a spa, restaurant, and events space.

Details here

All photos courtesy of Airbnb

To wrap up 2020, Airbnb released the top 50 most wish-listed unique rentals across all 50 states. The properties range from an Alaskan log cabin under the Northern Lights to a pirate-themed cottage in California. Here in New York, those looking to get away were most taken with a luxury treehouse in the Adirondacks, complete with a cable bridge, outdoor fire pit, and waterfall. The property in the town of Remsen rents for $498 a night, but it’s booked solid through March 2022!

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5 U.S. presidents who lived in New York City

By 6sqft, Fri, November 6, 2020

Portrait of George Washington via Wikimedia, Photo of Chester Alan Arthur via Wikimedia; Photo of Theodore Roosevelt via Wikimedia; Photo of Barack Obama via Wikimedia; Photo of Donald Trump via Wikimedia

New York City’s presidential history runs deep. Our nation’s very first president lived in the inaugural presidential mansion on Cherry Street during the city’s two-year reign as the country’s capital. As the 2020 presidential election finally wraps up, we’re taking a look at this original New York presidential residence, as well as those that followed, including Chester Arthur, Theodore Roosevelt, Barack Obama, and most recently, Donald Trump.

Where are the presidential homes in NYC?

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The 7 best places to see fall foliage outside NYC

By Rebecca Fishbein, Mon, September 28, 2020

A downside to living in a thriving city is that air pollution makes for poor fall foliage, though some spots in town—Wave Hill, Pelham Bay Park—still boast colorful leaves at the end of October. But if you take a short trip outside the city limits, you can see some beautiful autumn colors, all within a day’s drive. Sadly, the best fall foliage sightseeing trip is no more—Amtrak retired its glass-domed Adirondack train in 2018. But there are other spots to take in the season; here are our seven favorites.

Check out all the spots

Photo by Paul VanDerWerf via Flickr cc

Kingston, New York has been called the Hudson Valley’s “creative capital.” As Brooklyn Based explained, from the 1950s to the ’90s, it was home to a massive IBM campus, but the Catskills town grew increasingly vacant afterward. In recent years, however, it’s seen a resurgence of newcomers thanks to its historic housing stock, relatively low prices, foodie scene, proximity to outdoor activities, and zoning deliberately meant to attract artists. And in the face of the pandemic, these factors have made Kingston a go-to spot for those fleeing New York City. A report by the National Association of Realtors cited in Bloomberg found that Kingston has the fastest rising home prices in the U.S.

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Sea Breeze Hospital in Coney Island via Library of Congress

At a press conference on Monday about the recent coronavirus cases confirmed in New York City and State, Governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasio emphasized that this is not New York’s “first rodeo” when it comes to pandemics. They pointed to the recent Ebola scare, as well as the 1968 Hong Kong flu and the 2009 Swine Flu, which closed 200 schools across the state. But even long before that, New York has had a gold standard for handling outbreaks of contagious diseases. From managing the flu pandemic of 1918 to the tuberculosis surge at the turn of the 19th century, the city’s public health officials have been containing outbreaks for well over a century. Ahead, we look at some of the ways this done, from quarantines to sea hospitals.

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14 cozy NYC bars to stay warm at all winter

By Lidia Ryan, Tue, February 18, 2020

Winter in New York City can be tough — bitter winds, slushy sidewalks, walking to the subway in a massive winter parka. But these frigid temps and grey days (will February ever end?!) are the perfect excuse to escape to a cozy bar and warm up with a cocktail. To get you through the rest of winter, we’ve rounded up 14 of the coziest bars in the city for the coldest nights.

Check them all out

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The Christmas Tree at Rockefeller Center may be the most popular conifer in New York City, with 125 million people visiting the tree each year, but it certainly is not the only one. Every holiday season, spruces adorned with colorful lights and ornaments pop up across the five boroughs. The city’s many holiday trees each offer a unique take on the tradition, which began in NYC in 1912 when the first public Christmas tree was erected in Madison Square Park. For those looking to skip the Midtown crowds this year, we’ve rounded up 20 of the best holiday trees and lighting ceremonies, from the origami tree at the American Museum of Natural History to the flotilla of trees in Central Park’s Harlem Meer.

Get the full list

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9 tiny upstate houses you can rent this fall

By Michelle Sinclair Colman, Fri, October 18, 2019

All photos courtesy of Glamping Hub

As the leaves turn and the cool weather creeps back, it’s not hard to start daydreaming about a quiet weekend escape in a cozy vacation rental. And what better way to experience nature than in a tiny house? From a wood cabin in the Adirondacks to a modern retreat on a Catskills farm, we’ve rounded up nine tiny glamping spots that inspire big, lofty plans of how best to lay low and enjoy all the autumn glory upstate.

Check them all out

This Catskills community was designed by a real-life cowboy

By Michelle Sinclair Colman, Fri, October 4, 2019

All photos courtesy of The Chapin Estate

The Chapin Estate is a 2,500-acre gated residential preserve in the Catskills, a 90-minute drive from midtown Manhattan. And if its rustic-yet-elegant style seems striking to you, that’s likely because its founder, a real-life former rodeo star, was inspired by historic Adirondack Great Camps. Rather than “amenitizing” nature, Steve Dubrovsky designed around freshwater lakes and forests and left the site “wild.” There is a lake club for fishing and swimming, a gym, two pickleball courts, a tennis court, and a half basketball court. There is also Crestwood Mountain Farms, a working horse and cattle facility for all its residents to enjoy. Plus, the homes themselves were constructed using lumber from the site. Ahead, take a tour of the Chapin Estate and hear from Dubrovsky about his background and vision.

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