Search Result for Snøhetta

In Midtown, 1,401-foot One Vanderbilt is officially open

By Dana Schulz, Mon, September 14, 2020

Photo courtesy of SL Green

It’s been nearly four years since One Vanderbilt broke ground next to Grand Central, and after topping out one year ago at 1,401 feet, NYC’s fourth-tallest tower is officially open to office tenants. Developer SL Green, Manhattan’s largest office landlord, held an opening ceremony this morning in which they also unveiled a $220 million package of public open space and transit infrastructure improvements.

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battery playscape, the battery, nyc parks

The “bluffs” zone includes five granite slides and boulder scrambles; renderings courtesy of BKSK Architects & Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Planners

As the threat of climate change grows, parks in New York City are working to become more resilient. Officials on Thursday broke ground on an $18.3 million waterfront playground at the Battery in the Financial District. The Battery Playscape, as it’s being called, is expected to be one of the city’s largest sustainable parks. It will triple the size of the current playground and will feature a rainwater runoff system and a wide variety of durable plants.

See the design

Rendering of 50 West 66th Street courtesy of Binyan Studios/ Snøhetta

Construction of Extell’s controversial supertall on the Upper West Side can move forward, the city’s Board of Standards and Appeals ruled Tuesday. In an unusual 2-2 split decision, the BSA said the mechanical space planned for the tower at 50 West 66th Street is appropriate, rejecting a challenge from the preservation organization Landmark West. The group had argued that Extell abused the zoning code by including tall mechanical floors in its design in order to boost the overall height of units at the building, without increasing square footage.

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Rockwell Group, 550 Madison Avenue, AT&T Building

Rendering courtesy of Rockwell Group

The Olayan Group released a new batch of renderings giving us a sneak peek inside the amenity floor at 550 Madison Avenue. Designed by Rockwell Group, the seventh floor offers a mix of “hospitality-driven” spaces for tenants, including food and beverage options, lounges, shared workspaces, and fitness and wellness areas. The center of it all will be the iconic Philip Johnson-designed oculus—which greets visitors as soon as they step off the elevator on the club floor—framed by two floor-to-ceiling artworks by Dorothea Rockburne, which were commissioned in 1993 specifically for the building.

Have a look around

Snøhetta, 550 Madison Avenue, AT&T Building, Olayan Group

Renderings courtesy of Snøhetta and MOARE

The privately-owned public space (POPS) on the ground floor of Philip Johnson and John Burgee’s Postmodern skyscraper at 550 Madison Avenue declined over time due to multiple alterations and was often described as being “tall, skinny, and dark.” As part of Snøhetta’s transformation of the landmark, the garden is receiving a lot of attention. In December, developer Olayan Group revealed plans to increase the public space by 50 percent while creating “a welcoming sensory retreat in the heart of East Midtown.” After being approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission last year, the open space has now received its final approval from the Department of City Planning.

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Photo of One Vanderbilt on December 11, 2019 © 6sqft

After attending a presentation by One Vanderbilt‘s developer SL Green, the Post was able to share some juicy new details on the office building’s observation deck, which will be the second-highest outdoor deck in the city and is being designed by Snøhetta. Now known as The Summit at One Vanderbilt, the 59th-floor deck will have “two step-out, glass floor ledges that overhang Madison Avenue.” Also on this floor will be food and beverage options, and on the floor below will be an “‘infinity room’ with 40-foot-high ceilings.” The building is set to open in August 2020, while the Summit will begin welcoming guests (who will pay $35 for the experience) at the end of 2021.

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Newseum, World Trade Center antenna

Photo by Sagie / Flickr

The Newseum in Washington D.C. will close for good at the end of this year due to financial issues, and when it does, it will put a piece of the World Trade Center antenna in storage instead of giving it to the 9/11 Memorial and Museum here in New York City, as Gothamist reports. The 360-foot television and radio antenna, which was located on the North Tower, has been part of the Newseum’s September 11th exhibit since it opened at its current location in 2008.

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550 Madison Avenue, AT&T Building, Gensler

All renderings courtesy of Gensler

It’s been two years since developers unveiled their plans for a $300 million renovation of 550 Madison Avenue, helmed by architecture firm Snøhetta. Built in 1984 to the designs of Philip Johnson and John Burgee, the 647-foot building was the world’s first postmodern skyscraper. After several revisions, the renovation plans were approved by the LPC in February, and now, developer the Olayan Group has revealed the first renderings of the lobby. Most notably, the interior designs respect the 110-foot arched entryway and vaulted ceilings and add a window overlooking the proposed new public garden in the rear arcade.

More details ahead

Rendering of 50 West 66th Street courtesy of Binyan Studios/Snøhetta

Extell’s Snøhetta-designed Upper West Side tower at 50 West 66th Street has cleared one set of legal challenges but the building’s contested use of mechanical spaces remains an issue. As Crain’s reported on Tuesday, the city’s Board of Standards and Appeals voted down challenges to the building’s split zoning lots—upholding the Department of Buildings permits for the project—but voted to further scrutinize the tower’s use of mechanical floor spaces by initiating a review of whether Extell is “appropriately occupying” those spaces.

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NYC Council votes to close mechanical void loophole

By Devin Gannon, Thu, May 30, 2019

Rendering of 50 West 66th Street; courtesy of Binyan Studios/ Snøhetta

The New York City Council on Wednesday voted to close a zoning loophole that has allowed developers to fill multiple floors of a tower with mechanical equipment without counting the floors as part of the building. The so-called mechanical void loophole enabled taller residential towers, and therefore higher, more expensive units, without actually creating more housing. The amendment approved by the Council will count mechanical voids taller than 25 feet as zoning floor area, as Crain’s reported.

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Archtober2020